Philosophy

  • Most Topular Stories

  • What if colleges issued parents an itemized tuition bill?

    Leiter Reports: A Philosophy Blog
    Brian Leiter
    31 Jul 2015 | 2:37 pm
    An amusing idea from philosopher Erik Banks (Wright State).
  • The Phenomenology of the Munich and Göttingen Circles

    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
    Alessandro Salice
    3 Aug 2015 | 4:33 pm
    [New Entry by Alessandro Salice on August 3, 2015.] In the first decades of the twentieth century, the members of the so-called "Munich and Gottingen circles" of phenomenology made important contributions to the philosophy of mind, the philosophy of language, the philosophy of action, epistemology, social philosophy, the philosophy of values and ontology. Some of the most prominent members of these circles are (in alphabetical order): Theodor Conrad, Hedwig Conrad-Martius, Johannes Daubert, August...
  • Lori Gruen on Samuel Dubose, Cecil the Lion and the ethics of avowal

    Feminist Philosophers
    KateNorlock
    31 Jul 2015 | 5:27 am
    In her Al-Jazeera America post today, Lori Gruen, author of Entangled Empathy, says: “I’ve always been leery of the zero-sum mentality that suggests if you protest against one injustice that means you privilege it over another injustice. This is a convenient and distracting narrative that weakens efforts toward social change. Who benefits when those struggling for a better world end up fighting with each other?” Her article brings to my mind those occasions on which I’ve been told that I shouldn’t be a feminist because men have problems, too. Feminist-interested…
  • Trust

    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
    Carolyn McLeod
    3 Aug 2015 | 7:01 am
    [Revised entry by Carolyn McLeod on August 3, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Trust is important, but it is also dangerous. It is important because it allows us to form relationships with people and to depend on them - for love, for advice, for help with our plumbing, or what have you - especially when we know that no outside force compels them to give us such things. But trust also involves the risk that people we trust will not pull through for us; for, if there were some guarantee that they would pull through, then we would have no...
  • Against Intellectualism about Belief

    The Splintered Mind
    Eric Schwitzgebel
    31 Jul 2015 | 9:07 am
    Sometimes what we sincerely say -- aloud or even just silently to ourselves -- doesn't fit with the rest of our cognition, reactions, and behavior. Someone might sincerely say, for example, that women and men are equally intelligent, but be consistently sexist in his assessments of intelligence. (See the literature on implicit bias.) Someone might sincerely say that her dear friend has gone to Heaven, while her emotional reactions don't at all fit with that. On intellectualist views of belief, what we really believe is the thing we sincerely endorse, despite any other seemingly contrary…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

  • The Phenomenology of the Munich and Göttingen Circles

    Alessandro Salice
    3 Aug 2015 | 4:33 pm
    [New Entry by Alessandro Salice on August 3, 2015.] In the first decades of the twentieth century, the members of the so-called "Munich and Gottingen circles" of phenomenology made important contributions to the philosophy of mind, the philosophy of language, the philosophy of action, epistemology, social philosophy, the philosophy of values and ontology. Some of the most prominent members of these circles are (in alphabetical order): Theodor Conrad, Hedwig Conrad-Martius, Johannes Daubert, August...
  • Identity and Individuality in Quantum Theory

    Steven French
    3 Aug 2015 | 4:30 pm
    [Revised entry by Steven French on August 3, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] What are the metaphysical implications of quantum physics? One way of approaching this question is to consider the impact of the theory on our understanding of objects as individuals with well defined identity conditions. According to the 'Received View', which was elaborated as the quantum revolution was taking place, quantum theory implies that the fundamental particles of physics cannot be regarded as individual objects in this sense. Such a view has motivated the...
  • Trust

    Carolyn McLeod
    3 Aug 2015 | 7:01 am
    [Revised entry by Carolyn McLeod on August 3, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Trust is important, but it is also dangerous. It is important because it allows us to form relationships with people and to depend on them - for love, for advice, for help with our plumbing, or what have you - especially when we know that no outside force compels them to give us such things. But trust also involves the risk that people we trust will not pull through for us; for, if there were some guarantee that they would pull through, then we would have no...
  • Conservatism

    Andy Hamilton
    1 Aug 2015 | 2:55 am
    [New Entry by Andy Hamilton on August 1, 2015.] Conservatism and its modernising, anti-traditionalist rivals, liberalism and socialism, are the dominant political philosophies and ideologies of the post-Enlightenment era. Conservatives criticise their rivals for making a utopian exaggeration of the power of theoretical reason, and of human perfectibility. Conservative prescriptions are based on what they regard as experience rather than reason; for them, the ideal and the practical are inseparable. Most commentators regard conservatism as a modern political philosophy, even though it exhibits…
  • Salomon Maimon

    Peter Thielke and Yitzhak Melamed
    31 Jul 2015 | 5:51 pm
    [Revised entry by Peter Thielke and Yitzhak Melamed on July 31, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Salomon Maimon (1753 - 1800) stands as one of the most acute, original, and complicated thinkers - and certainly one of the most fascinating personalities - of the 1780s and 1790s. By granting the principle of sufficient reason unlimited validity Maimon embraces a radical form of rationalism. His robust criteria for the validity of knowledge suggests that even Kant's attempt to limit epistemological claims to the realm of possible experience cannot be...
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Talking Philosophy

  • Planned Parenthood & Fetal Tissue II: Providing & Researching

    Mike LaBossiere
    3 Aug 2015 | 2:22 pm
    Supporters of Planned Parenthood (Photo credit: Wikipedia) As noted in the previous essay, a series of undercover videos have brought Planned Parenthood and fetal tissue research to the attention of the public and the media. Obviously enough, providing fetal tissue and its use in research are matters of considerable moral concern. While there are two issues here, they are obviously connected: one cannot engage in fetal tissue research without this tissue. In the case of the Planned Parenthood videos, the fetal tissue in question is acquired from abortions performed by Planned Parenthood.
  • Planned Parenthood & Fetal Tissue I: Selling for Profit?

    Mike LaBossiere
    31 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com Thanks to undercover videos released by an anti-abortion group, Planned Parenthood is once again the focus of public and media attention. This situation has brought up many moral issues that are well worth considering. One matter of concern is the claim that Planned Parenthood has engaged in selling aborted fetuses for profit. The edited videos certainly seem crafted to create the impression that Planned Parenthood was haggling over the payments it would receive for aborted fetuses to be used in research and also considering changing the methods of abortion to…
  • The Parable of the Thermostat

    Mike LaBossiere
    29 Jul 2015 | 2:25 pm
    “So, an argument is sound when it is valid and actually has all true premises. Any of that stuff about deduction need any clarification or are there any questions or stuff?” “Professor, it is too warm in the room. Can you turn up the AC?” “I cannot. But, this will probably be the most important lesson you get in this class: see the thermostat there?” “Um, yeah.” “It isn’t a thermostat. It is just an empty plastic shell screwed to the wall.” “No way.” “Way. Here, I’ll show you….see, just an empty shell.” “But why? Why would they do that to us?” “It is so…
  • Go Trump or Go Home

    Mike LaBossiere
    27 Jul 2015 | 3:42 pm
    View image | gettyimages.com As I write this at the end of July, 2015 the U.S. Presidential elections are over a year away. However, the campaigning commenced some months ago and the first Republican presidential debate is coming up very soon. Currently, there are sixteen Republicans vying for their party’s nomination—but there is only room enough on stage for the top ten. Rather than engaging in an awesome Thunderdome style selection process, those in charge of the debate have elected to go with the top ten candidates as ranked in an average of some national polls. At this moment,…
  • Discussing the Shape of Things (that might be) to Come

    Mike LaBossiere
    24 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    One stock criticism of philosophers is their uselessness: they address useless matters or address useful matters in a way that is useless. One interesting specific variation is to criticize a philosopher for philosophically discussing matters of what might be. For example, a philosopher might discuss the ethics of modifying animals to possess human levels of intelligence. As another example, a philosopher might present an essay on the problem of personal identity as it relates to cybernetic replacement of the human body. In general terms, these speculative flights can be dismissed as doubly…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    European Journal of Philosophy

  • Critical Study: Cassam on Self-Knowledge for Humans

    Matthew Boyle
    16 Jul 2015 | 9:58 pm
  • The Sound of Bedrock: Lines of Grammar between Kant, Wittgenstein, and Cavell

    Avner Baz
    23 Jan 2015 | 9:51 pm
    Abstract In ‘Aesthetics Problems of Modern Philosophy’ Stanley Cavell proposes, first, that Kant's characterization of judgments of beauty may be read as a Wittgensteinian grammatical characterization, and, second, that the philosophical appeal to ‘what we say and mean’ partakes of the grammar of judgment of beauty. I argue first that the expression of the dawning of an aspect partakes of the grammar of judgments of beauty as characterized by Kant, and may also be seen—on a prevailing way of thinking about concepts and how they relate to their instances—to have the same kind of…
  • The Limits of Learning: Habermas' Social Theory and Religion

    Maeve Cooke
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:17 pm
    Abstract Habermas' view that contemporary philosophy and social theory can learn from religious traditions calls for closer consideration. He is correct to hold that religious traditions constitute a reservoir of potentially important meanings that can be critically appropriated without emptying them of their motivating and inspirational power. However, contrary to what he implies, his theory allows for learning from religion only to a very limited degree. This is due to two core elements of his conceptual framework, both of which are key features of his account of postmetaphysical thinking.
  • Kierkegaard's Phenomenology of Spirit

    Ulrika Carlsson
    7 Jul 2014 | 7:27 pm
    Abstract Kierkegaard's preoccupation with a separation between the ‘inner’ and the ‘outer’ runs through his work and is widely thought to belong to his rejection of Hegel's idealist monism. Focusing on The Concept of Irony and Either/Or, I argue that although Kierkegaard believes in various metaphysical distinctions between inside and outside (the inwardness of faith and the outwardness of ethics and language; the inwardness of emotion and the outwardness of behavior), he nonetheless understands the task of the philosopher as that of making outside and inside converge in a…
  • Heidegger the Metaphysician: Modes-of-Being and Grundbegriffe

    Howard D. Kelly
    13 Jun 2014 | 9:55 pm
    Abstract Modes-of-being (Seinsarten) figure centrally in Heidegger's masterwork Being and Time. Testimony to this is Heidegger's characterisation of two of his most celebrated enquiries—the Existential analytic and the Zeug analysis—as investigations into the respective modes-of-being of the entities concerned. Yet despite the importance of this concept, commentators disagree widely about what a mode-of-being is. In this paper, I systematically outline and defend a novel and exegetically grounded interpretation of this concept. Strongly opposed to Kantian readings, such as those advocated…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Feminist Philosophers

  • CFP: Justice and Social Ontology of Race

    KateNorlock
    3 Aug 2015 | 2:16 pm
    The North American Society for Social Philosophy (NASSP) invites submissions for its group session at the Pacific APA, 2016. The theme of our session will be: “Justice and the Social Ontology of Race” Proposals on topics intersecting this theme, broadly understood, are welcome, and might include: –       The use of racial categories in social planning and policy –       The ontological status and import of racial categories –       Race and the justice system –       The role of race in social and political identity –      …
  • Kingma and Woollard on Pregnancy and State Interference

    jennysaul
    3 Aug 2015 | 5:01 am
    Philosophers Eliselijn Kingma and Fiona Woollard have responded to a Dutch proposal to increase government powers with respect to pregnant women smoking. It is very sad when an early life is set back before it is even born. But it is also dreadful that one in four women is the victim of domestic abuse, and that in 30% of cases that abuse begins during pregnancy. Nonetheless the state does not place webcams in our homes, or chips in expectant fathers. Why? Because a just state needs to balance (1) the protection of individuals against each other, and (2) the protection of individuals against…
  • The Sunday Manhattan cat: “I watched you leave”

    annejjacobson
    1 Aug 2015 | 2:02 pm
    Readers are invited to submit more cheerful lines. H/t to RMcK
  • Ideals dramatically changed, reality less so

    jennysaul
    1 Aug 2015 | 9:58 am
    Many thanks to A for sending on this article. “The majority of young men and women say they would ideally like to equally share earning and caregiving with their spouse,” said Sarah Thébaud, a sociologist at the University of California, Santa Barbara. “But it’s pretty clear that we don’t have the kinds of policies and flexible work options that really facilitate egalitarian relationships.”
  • Lori Gruen on Samuel Dubose, Cecil the Lion and the ethics of avowal

    KateNorlock
    31 Jul 2015 | 5:27 am
    In her Al-Jazeera America post today, Lori Gruen, author of Entangled Empathy, says: “I’ve always been leery of the zero-sum mentality that suggests if you protest against one injustice that means you privilege it over another injustice. This is a convenient and distracting narrative that weakens efforts toward social change. Who benefits when those struggling for a better world end up fighting with each other?” Her article brings to my mind those occasions on which I’ve been told that I shouldn’t be a feminist because men have problems, too. Feminist-interested…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Gender, Race and Philosophy: The Blog

  • Private Prison Divestment

    Sally
    17 Jul 2015 | 6:31 am
    Christia Mercer (Columbia) discusses Columbia University's decision to divest from private prisons and reminds us of the power of divestment in the anti-Apartheid movement.
  • Why Is The University Still White?

    Sally
    3 Jun 2015 | 3:15 am
    New APPS has a lengthy post giving a structural analysis of Nathaniel Adam Tobias Coleman's termination at UCL. Worth reading. Readers of New APPS may recall Nathaniel Adam Tobias Coleman as the author of a powerful piece last March in Times Higher Education that drew attention to the discipline of philosophy’s overall, systemic failure to critically engage its own Whiteness.  And now, DailyNous draws our attention to a piece in The Independent, itself sourced (again) from Times Higher Education, in which Coleman announces that he will lose his position at University College…
  • Race and Racism CFA/CFP

    Sally
    24 Apr 2015 | 6:09 am
    CALL FOR ABSTRACTS/PAPERS Workshop: Race and Racism November 13-15, 2015 Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa Recent philosophical contributions to critical race theory have been exciting, some of the better and more important philosophical work of the past twenty years. This workshop aims to further this dialogue, in a conversation between scholars from South Africa and scholars from elsewhere. Possible questions for discussion: What are races? Are they biological populations or lineages, social creations, or cultures? Non-racialist discourse is prominent among intellectuals in South…
  • TWO PIKSIs!

    Sally
    16 Feb 2015 | 8:14 am
    Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/APA Sponsored Philosophy in an Inclusive Key Summer Institutes (PIKSI) 2015 SUMMER  INSTITUTES FOR  UNDERGRADUATES Application Deadline:  March 13, 2015  Online application form here. PIKSI summer institutes are designed to encourage undergraduates from underrepresented groups to consider future study of philosophy. Undergraduates and recent graduates from underrepresented groups such as women, African Americans, Chicano/as and Latino/as, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, LGBTs, economically disadvantaged communities, and people with…
  • Brown University Summer Immersion Program

    Sally
    16 Feb 2015 | 7:47 am
    The Brown Philosophy Department is pleased to announce a call for applications for the Summer Immersion Program in Philosophy at Brown University. SIPP@Brown is a two-week residential program for members of traditionally underrepresented groups in philosophy, including women and students of color. This year's program will run from May 31, 2015 to June 13, 2015 and will feature seminars taught by Brown faculty and the SIPP@Brown research conference. Students will have travel and lodging expenses covered and will receive a $500 stipend. More information is available…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    In Socrates' Wake

  • Philosophers' Magazine -- on teaching

    Michael Cholbi
    14 Jul 2015 | 2:00 pm
    The Philosophers' Magazine, a well-known UK publication, will focus its next issue on teaching. Preview below the cut: The Philosophers’ Magazine aims bring readable philosophical writing to the wider world. The next issue features a number of articles about teaching philosophy, in addition to the usual mix of articles, opinion pieces, columns, news, and book and film reviews.   In it, Jennifer M Morton argues that philosophy ought to go beyond critical thinking and help disadvantaged people think about building a better world, Michael Cholbi makes a case for the view that grading…
  • AAPT: Workshop on Teaching and Learning in Philosophy

    Michael Cholbi
    2 Jul 2015 | 10:52 am
    CALL FOR APPLICATIONSThe American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT)“To Improve The Quality Of Instruction In Philosophy At All Levels”Teaching & Learning in Philosophy: Dallas/Ft.WorthLocation:                     North Texas University, Denton, TXDate:                           Saturday, September 26,…
  • APA session: The philosophy major

    Michael Cholbi
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:49 am
    The APA Committee on Teaching Philosophy is seeking participants for a panel on the philosophy major, to be held at the Eastern Division meeting (January 2016, Washington D.C.). The deadline to volunteer is August 10. More details here.
  • APA session: Advice for job candidates on the teaching demo

    Michael Cholbi
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:29 am
    The APA Committee on Teaching Philosophy is seeking participants for a panel (Eastern meeting, January 2016, Washington DC) to advise job candidates on teaching demonstrations. The deadline to volunteer is August 17. More details here.
  • CFP: Teaching Philosophy, etc., at Indiana Philosophical Association

    Michael Cholbi
    9 Jun 2015 | 9:45 am
    Call for PapersIndiana Philosophical AssociationFall Meeting, 13-14 November 2015Earlham College (Richmond, Indiana)Keynote SpeakerWalter BroganVillanova UniversityPapers in any area of philosophy are welcome. Submitted papers should be (i) no more than3000 words, (ii) prepared for anonymous review, and (iii) accompanied by a separate page thatincludes title, author information (name, affiliation, and contact information), and an abstractnot exceeding 150 words. Materials should be submitted to Prof. Sam Kahn atindianacfp@gmail.com. Suggestions for commentators and sessions chairs (including…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Philosophy by the Way

  • Keep it simple

    19 Jul 2015 | 4:32 pm
    Descartes’ Rules for the Direction of the Mind (see my blog dated June 22, 2015) gives not only the basic rules for a methodic approach of scientific problems. It contains also a number of statements that have a wider meaning; statements that have sense in the daily contact of men with each other. Some seem obvious. Nevertheless we often forget to apply them. For example, in Rule IX Descartes tells us that people are often more impressed by difficult high-flown far-fetched reasonings that they don’t completely understand than by simple transparent arguments. Knowledge, so Descartes, must…
  • Why it is good to make a bad plan.

    12 Jul 2015 | 4:15 pm
    I finished my last blog saying that with his definition of “person” Locke gave a lead of departure for future discussions on the concept. We call such a lead also a “handle”. Famous critics of Locke were Joseph Butler (1736) and Thomas Reid (1785), but the discussion still goes on today. It shows how important a good handle is for starting a discussion and making progress, for what should we talk about if we have nothing to talk about? We should first have to invent a theme and next we should have to give it contents, too. For instance, we can decide to talk about “man” as the…
  • Making up for an omission

    6 Jul 2015 | 4:38 am
    John Locke made the idea of consciousness the heart of his theory of man. He was the first who developed a thorough theory of consciousness. That’s why I called him the father of consciousness theories in my last blog, although he didn’t invent the concept. Many theories of consciousness followed since then. Some such theories, which often refer explicitly to Locke, discuss the question what a person is, since Locke was also the first philosopher who defined the concept of person. I, too, have written about this subject, in blogs and in articles. What I never did, however, was quoting…
  • Locke's tremendous idea

    28 Jun 2015 | 4:22 pm
    According to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, John Locke defined consciousness as “the perception of what passes in a man’s own mind.” I suppose that it is true that Locke said so, although I cannot check it, for there is no reference added to the quotation, which actually is to be expected in a work of that standing. Anyway, the passage is not from the famous chapter XXVII “Of Identity and Diversity” in Locke’s An Essay concerning Human Understanding (first published in 1689, but this chapter was added in 1694). Here Locke develops the idea of personal identity and links it to the…
  • Descartes' tremendous idea

    21 Jun 2015 | 4:21 pm
    Science is a modern idea. In my last blog I wrote that Montaigne was an essayist and a writer. He was also a keen observer. By writing down his observations, Montaigne broadened our view on ourselves and environment and our self-insight. But Montaigne was not a scientist; he was not an investigator. In his time the idea of science was yet developing and by his view that everything can be doubted Montaigne contributed to its development. His adage was “What do I know?”, which would later find expression in the doubt that Descartes used for laying the foundations of the ideas of knowledge…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Brooks Blog

  • Sky News interview with Jeremy Thompson

    3 Aug 2015 | 1:20 pm
    I've had a second Sky News interview this evening shortly after 5.30pm with Jeremy Thompson. I was asked about Prime Minister David Cameron's new plans announced today that would see landlords forced to evict illegal immigrants -- effectively turning landlords into border agents. My view is simple: if the previous Immigration Minister in Cameron's government, Mark Harper, was mistaken to believe his cleaner was legally allowed to work in the UK (she was not and Harper swiftly resigned), then there is little hope others will do much better than him. Furthermore, these plans have not been shown…
  • UPDATED: My thoughts on the Calais migrant crisis

    2 Aug 2015 | 6:50 am
    I've been interviewed by a number of media organisations over the last few days, including BBC News, Sky News, Al Jazeera (2x) and France 24 and several radio stations such as BBC Radio Newcastle (from 01:09:00) and BBC Radio Tees (from 27.30). I've written a short post for the leading Labour Party blog LabourList on how the current crisis should be addressed. In short, there should be less finger-pointing and more cooperation at several levels. First, the UK and France must work more closely together to calm current tensions, but realise any measures are likely to only affect the…
  • So why were the UK polls so wrong?

    16 Jul 2015 | 4:07 pm
    The polls for the May 2015 election had Labour and the Conservatives neck and neck. I was interviewed by Australia's ABC News 24 the day after the election. I had spent a long night at our local election count with my friend and MP Phil Wilson (who I'm delighted to say increased his vote share) -- Wilson succeeded Tony Blair as MP for Sedgefield. Many theories were sprung to explain the unbelievable.But my view was - and remains - that Labour supporters were not sufficiently motivated to vote for our side. The Tories did much better than expected because their side was more motivated to turn…
  • The Brooks Blog to produce new journal rankings

    16 Jul 2015 | 6:32 am
    It is now about 4 years since I last published journal rankings in Philosophy. My original post can be found HERE and it's one of the more popular links on this blog. I know it's regularly used, but it can also be updated and improved.I will shortly announce a new poll - the most comprehensive yet - of philosophy journals to inform a new ranking. I am likely to group journals in categories A, B, C and so on as before, but retain a numerical ranking as well with scores. So watch this space. In the meantime, please look over my earlier rankings - recommendations for how they might be updated…
  • Hegel Bulletin - Is Hegel a Retributivist?

    15 Jul 2015 | 1:02 am
    Hegel Bulletin - Is Hegel a Retributivist?The above is a link to my article first published in the Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain in 2004, but only now available online through Cambridge University Press (thanks to CUP agreeing to publish a revamped Hegel Bulletin). This piece was a runner-up for a graduate essay prize.The article marked an important turning point for me. It is my first substantial examination of Hegel's theory of punishment where I begin to make clear that he could not have been a retributivist. I did not yet argue for his having a unified theory of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    In Search of Enlightenment

  • Biologically Modified Justice (FINISHED!)

    24 Jul 2015 | 10:29 am
    My book Biologically Modified Justice is now finished, and sent off to the publishers at Cambridge University Press. PHEW! It took me over a decade and a half to write the darn thing. By far it will be the most significant book I write in my career, which is not to say it will necessarily be significant. But I obviously hope it is! By "significant" I mean I hope it will help foster interdisciplinary dialogue between those working in the humanities/social sciences and those working in the life sciences. I also hope it will help foster more rational and cogent deliberation and debate of how to…
  • Teaching Political Philosophy in Prison: Some Initial Reflections

    28 May 2015 | 7:54 pm
    For the past two months I have been (volunteer) teaching a bi-weekly Political Philosophy Discussion Group to inmates at a prison here in Kingston. So far we have covered Plato’s Republic, The Apology, Crito, civil disobedience, and Hobbes’s Leviathan (next up is Marx). While it is not appropriate for me to comment on anything specific to the inmates or penal institution (which would violate confidentiality guidelines I am bound to), I can share a few pedagogical reflections on my experience to date which I hope might motivate other academics (and non-academics) to consider getting…
  • “End of Teaching Term”

    30 Mar 2015 | 4:46 pm
    7 months ago 250 undergraduate students and I started an intellectual journey through the history of ideas, from Plato to Marx, in my Introduction to Political Theory evening course. We transcended our time and location in search of knowledge and wisdom concerning how we ought to live, collectively together, as a society.Our journey started with the Ancient Greeks- Is democracy simply “rule by the ignorant”, as Plato argued in The Republic? Is the “unexamined life not worth living”, as Socrates asserted when threatened with the death penalty for challenging the beliefs of his…
  • Virtue Ethics and Democracy Paper

    24 Mar 2015 | 6:27 am
    Tomorrow the Queen's Political Philosophy Group will be discussing my new paper titled "Virtue Ethics and the Democratic Life". The group is very good at highlighting the problems with an author's argument- bringing to the fore an author's hidden assumptions, misinterpretations, mistakes, etc. so it should be fun! A draft version of the paper is available on my academia.edu page, Cheers, Colin
  • Getting to Age 100... How Healthy Are Centenarians in the Years Leading Up to that Milestone?

    9 Feb 2015 | 1:48 pm
    One of the central concerns people often express about longevity science is the worry that science might just extend the number of years we live in a frail, disabled state at the end of life. Our goal should be to "add life to years, rather than simply adding (unhealthy) years to a long life".The good news is that an aging intervention would most likely address exactly that concern. The bad news is that the current approach of the biomedical sciences (what I call "negative biology"), by striving to tackle each specific disease of aging, is doing *precisely* what we all don't want- extending…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    In Living Color

  • Accutane Ethics

    24 Jul 2015 | 11:29 am
    My son has been taking Accutane for the last several months.  Boy it works well (for acne).  It also raises some first class ethical questions.  There's an extremely strict regimen for taking Accutane, because apparently if a woman takes it and conceives a child, the child will likely be born with significant but not super-serious abnormalities. For example, the child's external ears may be
  • Swastika Cakes and Gay Weddings

    7 Apr 2015 | 11:07 am
    It's so rare that Jon Stewart reasons badly, but I wonder about the reasoning in his Indiana piece last night.  Start at 3:45-- The Daily Show Daily Show Full Episodes,  More Daily Show Videos,  Comedy Central Full Episodes Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum, etc., compare the baker who refuses to "do" a gay wedding with-- A gay printer who refuses to print signs saying "God hates fags" A
  • Pet Euthanasia

    9 Mar 2015 | 7:36 am
    Our soulful cat Snownose died on Saturday, from cancer, but with the help of euthanasia.  I've never had a cat euthanized before, though I've had many cats.  The whole month before, I had to work up the courage to do this, as did other family members.  I kept thinking about the conservative stance on euthanasia: that intentionally killing another person is always wrong.  (If this were right,
  • The Marquette Situation

    5 Feb 2015 | 9:28 am
    A word about Marquette's attempt to fire John McAdams.  One thing (among many) that bothers me is that Dean Holz's letter reveals a double standard.  In the second paragraph he charges McAdams with trying to "silence the less-powerful" but nowhere in the letter does he voice any concern at all about the undergraduate--who is the less powerful person in the instructor-student relationship.  Here
  • Sexual Misconduct on College Campuses

    1 Dec 2014 | 11:43 am
    Every week there's another appalling story about the way college campuses deal with sexual misconduct.  A Rolling Stone investigation of UVA shows that on some campuses there's not much of a response even if  a student complains of being gang raped by seven men at a frat party. Among many astonishing details in the story: there were 38 allegations of sexual assault in a recent one year period at
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Alexander Pruss's Blog

  • An argument that there must be infinitely many horses

    30 Jul 2015 | 3:45 pm
    1. For any finite number n, if there can be n horses, there can be fewer than n horses. 2. There cannot be fewer than zero horses. 3. Thus there must be an infinite number of horses. The inference proceeds as follows. Imagine that there can be some finite number, say 10, of horses. Then by applying (1) ten times, we will conclude that there can be fewer than zero horses. :-)
  • Enemies and opponents

    29 Jul 2015 | 1:52 pm
    When Jesus said to love one's neighbor, he was asked who was one's neighbor. When he said to love one's enemy, he wasn't asked who was one's enemy. But while it may be unhelpful to work hard to identify people as our enemies, it is helpful to work hard to identify people who are not our enemies. After all, (a) it's hard to love those we take to be our enemies, and we shouldn't try to engage in this difficult task when it can be avoided simply by realizing that these people are not our enemies, and (b) love comes in a variety of forms, and the way one loves one's enemy differs from the…
  • Optimism

    28 Jul 2015 | 7:46 pm
    I've been gradually realizing just how important it is to presume our ideological and political opponents to be motivated by pursuit of the good and true. Of course, in some cases the presumption is false, but likewise sometimes our co-partisans--and we ourselves--are motivated badly. Here's a psychological advantage of making this presumption. If we lose out to our opponents (say, in the polis, in a department meeting, etc.), it's much less depressing when we see it as nonetheless a kind of victory for the true and the good--for we presume that the desire for the true and the good is what…
  • Saving lives and killing

    26 Jul 2015 | 8:39 am
    Suppose I pull a drowning person out of the water, and no one else around would have. Then I save the person's life. Why? The natural thing to say is: he's alive because I pulled him out; and had I not pulled him out, he would have been dead.  On the other hand, a trapeze artist makes a stunning high leap and, as prearranged, is caught by another. Suppose in this (irresponsible) act there is no safety net: if she didn't catch him, he'd be dead. Despite the truth of the counterfactual that he'd be dead if she didn't catch him and he's alive because she caught him, we wouldn't…
  • Value of species membership

    20 Jul 2015 | 1:26 pm
    We generally think that humans have a dignity that non-human animals like dogs lack, even when the humans are so disabled that their functioning is on the level of a dog. While Kant rightly insists that dignity does not reduce to value, nonetheless dignity seems to imply a value. Perhaps the point generalizes so that it is better to be a member of a spiffier species even if one personally lacks those features that make the species spiffier.This isn’t clear, however. I wish I had the amazing mathematical abilities of a Vulcan like Spock. I don’t really wish to be a mathematically disabled…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Splintered Mind

  • Against Intellectualism about Belief

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    31 Jul 2015 | 9:07 am
    Sometimes what we sincerely say -- aloud or even just silently to ourselves -- doesn't fit with the rest of our cognition, reactions, and behavior. Someone might sincerely say, for example, that women and men are equally intelligent, but be consistently sexist in his assessments of intelligence. (See the literature on implicit bias.) Someone might sincerely say that her dear friend has gone to Heaven, while her emotional reactions don't at all fit with that. On intellectualist views of belief, what we really believe is the thing we sincerely endorse, despite any other seemingly contrary…
  • Podcast Interview of Me, about Ethicists' Moral Behavior

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    28 Jul 2015 | 5:43 pm
    ... other topics included rationalization and confronting one's moral imperfection, at Rationally Speaking. Thanks, Julia, for your terrific, probing questions!
  • Cute AI and the ASIMO Problem

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    24 Jul 2015 | 1:18 pm
    A couple of years ago, I saw the ASIMO show at Disneyland. ASIMO is a robot designed by Honda to walk bipedally with something like the human gait. I'd entered the auditorium with a somewhat negative attitude about ASIMO, having read Andy Clark's critique of Honda's computationally-heavy approach to robotic locomotion (fuller treatment here); and the animatronic Mr. Lincoln is no great shakes. But ASIMO is cute! He's about four feet tall, humanoid, with big round dark eyes inside what looks a bit like an astronaut's helmet. He talks, he dances, he kicks soccer balls, he makes funny hand…
  • Philosophy Via Facebook? Why Not?

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    19 Jul 2015 | 10:45 am
    An adapation of my June blog post What Philosophical Work Could Be, in today's LA Times. -------------------------------------- Academic philosophers tend to have a narrow view of what is valuable philosophical work. Hiring, tenure, promotion and prestige depend mainly on one's ability to produce journal articles in a particular theoretical, abstract style, mostly in reaction to a small group of canonical and 20th century figures, for a small readership of specialists. We should broaden our vision. Consider the historical contingency of the journal article, a late-19th century invention. Even…
  • The Moral Lives of Ethicists

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    14 Jul 2015 | 8:28 am
    [published today in Aeon Magazine] None of the classic questions of philosophy are beyond a seven-year-old's understanding. If God exists, why do bad things happen? How do you know there's still a world on the other side of that closed door? Are we just made of material stuff that will turn into mud when we die? If you could get away with killing and robbing people just for fun, would you? The questions are natural. It's the answers that are hard. Eight years ago, I'd just begun a series of empirical studies on the moral behavior of professional ethicists. My son Davy, then seven years old,…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    In the Space of Reasons

  • The Collaborating Centre for Values-based Practice in Health and Social Care Website

    3 Aug 2015 | 8:00 am
    The Collaborating Centre for Values-based Practice in Health and Social Care Website is now live. It’s here.“Dear All We are delighted to announce the launch of our website - it is now live and open to all! If you have any contributions for our news and Notes section please do not hesitate to get in contact and if you know of any new partners who might be interested in becoming an individual or organizational partner please ask them to contact us via the website. Kind Regards Jenette Sefton (On Behalf of the Management Team)”
  • Reasons for buying a house

    31 Jul 2015 | 2:47 am
    I was talking to a friend over pizza in Kendal last night who is beginning to think of buying a house, possibly here. Asking about the factors that would influence a selection she suggested a variety. I have not tidied them up to be properties or qualities of a house but rather reasons of any sort. They included:Proximity to either Kendal station A view of greenery An appropriate price Avoidance of a split level garden Fear of icy pavements Walking access to civic facilities Location outside three less salubrious areas of town Other factors that sometimes…
  • Tâtonnement and failing to 'find' a paper

    22 Jul 2015 | 1:42 am
    I spent yesterday trying to start a paper on John Campbell’s noughties papers [Campbell 2007, 2008, 2009] on causation in psychiatry and psychology but failed to get anywhere. Having recently read Peter Goldie’s book The Mess Inside, I wonder whether the word for the day’s activities is ‘tâtonnement’, which he suggests is a kind of feeling one’s way to a narrative: ‘a tentative, groping procedure: one might begin with an idea of how the narrative should be shaped, and, once one has developed it somewhat, one might be able to see saliences that one could not see before, and then…
  • Psychiatric diagnosis, tacit knowledge and criteria

    15 Jul 2015 | 1:28 am
    I realise that these draft papers are rather a dull use of a blog but it is why I started it originally.AbstractThe two main psychiatric taxonomies set out codifications of psychiatric diagnoses via lists of symptoms with the aim of maximising the reliability of diagnostic judgements. This approach has been criticised, however, for failing to capture the precise connection between diagnostic judgements and symptoms as detected by skilled clinicians. Assuming that this criticism is correct, this chapter offers related two accounts of why this might be so. First, skilled diagnostic judgement…
  • Recovery, paternalism and narrative understanding in mental healthcare

    10 Jul 2015 | 5:42 am
    I have cheated and replaced the first version with a second version a week later.Recovery, paternalism and narrative understanding in mental healthcareAbstractThere has been a growing emphasis on the idea that recovery in mental healthcare should not be seen as a matter of getting better but instead of successfully living a flourishing life as conceived by the subject herself. Theorists of recovery also stress the importance of narrative understanding for articulating the sort of life that would count as recovery. But surely one of the threats of mental illness is that it can undermine a…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Freemason Information

  • Dissecting The 1723 Constitutions Of Free-Masons; Dispelling Revisionist Myths.

    Fred Milliken
    3 Aug 2015 | 11:28 am
    ARE YOU READY TO THINK? I have come across one of the most thought provoking articles in a long time. It’s not the same old hash but from a fellow Masonic writer Hank Kraychir who is a top rate Masonic researcher. His website, GnosisMasonry, has many wonderful and thoughtful articles on it. But this one strikes a cord that is so important to us all – OUR HISTORY. So with permission from Brother Kraychir here is his wonderful article: Dissecting The 1723 Constitutions Of Free-Masons; Dispelling Revisionist Myths.   A note from the author: Please take your time reading and…
  • Interview With Masonic Author Frederic Milliken, His Life And Times and Texas’ New Intervisitation

    Fred Milliken
    26 Jul 2015 | 1:47 pm
    Elena Llamas, Director of Pubic Relations for the Phoenixmasonry Masonic Museum and Library I recently had the pleasure to interview one of Phoenixmasonry’s own, Bro. Frederic Millken, Executive Director for the Phoenixmasonry Masonic Museum and Library. Frederic is a prominent and hard working Masonic author. The reason for the interview, however, was the recent intervisitation between the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Texas and the Grand Lodge of Texas. Frederic has a fascinating personal and Masonic history included here that I hope readers will find as interesting as I…
  • THE PROBLEM WITH NEWSLETTERS

    TimBryce
    13 Jul 2015 | 3:08 am
    BRYCE ON LIFE – Why most end up lining the bottom of bird cages. (Click for AUDIO VERSION) To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request. I have belonged to a plethora of nonprofit organizations over the years, be it related to Information Technology, management, homeowner associations, sports clubs, political groups, fraternal organizations, school clubs, etc. Most, if not all issue a newsletter either monthly, bi-monthly, or quarterly. Due to rising printing and postal prices, most have gone to an electronic format, be it on the web or in PDF format, which…
  • If You Truly Want To Walk On Water, You Have To Get Out Of The Boat

    Fred Milliken
    11 Jul 2015 | 2:19 pm
    “If you run with wolves, you will learn how to howl. But, if you associate with eagles, you will learn how to soar to great heights.” I was watching a video by Dennis Prager on happiness recently when it suddenly came to me that this had much significance for my Freemasonry and what the Craft meant to me. Now you might not see any Masonic connection with the video included here. One of the reasons is that we all join Freemasonry for different reasons and we all participate in the aspect of Freemasonry that speaks loudest to us. Some of us use Freemasonry to network. The…
  • THE DIGNITY OF WORK

    TimBryce
    10 Jul 2015 | 3:00 am
    BRYCE ON LIFE – Every job is important. I had a friend who used to be very class conscious when it came to work. He wouldn’t socialize with other people he deemed below him and was very choosy when it came to where he lived. If the wrong class of workers were in the neighborhood, he wouldn’t visit the area (let alone move into it). It had nothing to do with race or religion, only the types of jobs people had. In his mind, there was a clear delineation between people based strictly on their livelihood; e.g., blue collar labor, technical people, middle management, professional…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Mindful Word

  • RESONANCE: When we tune in to nature and other human beings, we create an energy field of understanding and empathy

    editor
    3 Aug 2015 | 12:39 pm
    RESONANCE: When we tune in to nature and other human beings, we create an energy field of understanding and empathy I love the word Resonance. Resonance comes from the Latin verb ‘resonare’, meaning to ‘return to sound’. It means to sound and resound, as in an echo. Another type of resonance is called sympathetic resonance. Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • FEMININE HYGIENE: Menstrual products that are better for you and the environment

    editor
    2 Aug 2015 | 7:22 am
    FEMININE HYGIENE: Menstrual products that are better for you and the environment Every woman experiences menstruation, but not every woman knows the alternatives to disposable pads and tampons. Not only do alternatives help the environment, they also help you. Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • THE GIFT OF WRITING: To be a good writer, you have to be giving

    Pamela Gerber
    31 Jul 2015 | 7:27 am
    “Compassion is a verb.” – Thich Nhat Hanh I teach writing. My community college students cannot escape my class—or at least the course I teach—if […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • QUANTUM-TOUCH: Q&A Interview with Richard Gordon

    UB Hawthorn
    30 Jul 2015 | 5:17 am
    There’s a lot of skepticism surrounding energy healing. In some instances people test their skepticism by trying it out for themselves. In other cases, the doubts remain. […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • THE MOMENT OF CALM: Tips on forgiveness from Dada J.P. Vaswani

    Anjali Mani
    28 Jul 2015 | 1:12 pm
    What does it really mean to forgive? Oxford Dictionary describes it as the following: “Stop feeling angry or resentful toward (someone) for an offense, flaw, or […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Philosophers' Cocoon

  • Skilled perception and mystical percepion

    Helen De Cruz
    3 Aug 2015 | 1:58 pm
    For the last installment of my featured author blog series on skilled perception, I'd like to focus on the question of mystical perception. How do religious believers come to perceive religious beings such as God? If such perceptions are the result of skilled perception - as I will argue - what follows for the justification of religious beliefs formed on the basis of religious perception?  Authors like Swinburne and Alston have argued that religious experience provides positive justification for religious belief. Religious experience, so they assume, is analogous to sense perception.
  • Job-Market Boot Camp, Part 18: The Campus Visit

    Marcus Arvan
    3 Aug 2015 | 8:32 am
    Although it's a bit early to discuss fly-outs/campus visits, I suppose now is as good of a time as any to turn to them in our Job-Market Boot Camp. Alas, when it comes to this issue, I find myself in a bit of a bind--for, to be perfectly frank, I have only had one of them turn into a TT job offer. Consequently, what I would like to do here is (A) direct readers to what I found to be a very helpful series of posts at The Professor is In, and (B) provide some suggestions based on my experiences on fly-outs. Suggestion 1: know the school and department you are visiting This might sound too…
  • Guest post on the costs of applying to grad school

    Marcus Arvan
    2 Aug 2015 | 5:54 am
    By Anonymous In recent years, academic philosophy has made an unequivocal commitment to fostering diversity in the philosophical community. Spearheading this effort, the APA has offered resources for diversity and inclusiveness in teaching, arranged committees on diversity in the profession, and now robustly tracks the demographics of our field. In a discipline devoid of much consensus, the commitment to diversity at all levels of philosophy (undergraduate, graduate, faculty and leadership) is nearly unanimous. Despite this widespread effort to make philosophy a more inclusive discipline, the…
  • Call for referees

    Marcus Arvan
    2 Aug 2015 | 5:53 am
    So the good news is that submissions to this year's annual Philosophers' Cocoon Philosophy Conference are up almost 200% compared to the last two years. The less exciting news is that it means I could really use some additional referees! :) If there are any of you out there who didn't submit to the conference are willing to lend a helping hand to review a paper or two, I would be very appreciative. I wouldn't ask for a referee report, just a "thumbs up" or "thumbs down." If you'd like to volunteer, please either comment below or email me…
  • What should graduate departments disclose about placement?

    Marcus Arvan
    30 Jul 2015 | 6:03 am
    As I understand it, many philosophy PhD programs these days report their placement records (i.e. placement of graduates into academic jobs) on their websites. For instance, my alma mater, Arizona, has a very thorough webpage reporting placements dating all the way from 1990 to the present. To the best of my recollection, when I started graduate school, almost no programs reported their placement rates anywhere. Deciding which school to attend, then, was very much of a guessing game. One had to sort of just go on the department's reputation, and go with one's own sense of their…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Re-constructing Strategy

  • 5 Misconceptions in North America about Muslims

    saqib qureshi
    15 Jul 2015 | 12:41 pm
    1 – They are something outside of us, they’re not part of us: Muslims have lived in the US and Canada since before either country achieved national independence. The first Muslim presence in what is now the US dates to 1528, and in what is now Canada, to 1854. Muslims are not only the fourth largest religious community in the US and the second largest in Canada, but their contribution to their respective countries has been integral to the development of the national consciousness through the likes of Muhammad Ali and Malcolm X. 2 – Muslims are more violent than are other…
  • What if the US Became Completely Isolationist?

    saqib qureshi
    4 Jul 2015 | 12:06 pm
    Let’s just imagine a world in which the US government completely withdraws from the rest of the world. Let us just imagine. This is not a bizarre idea. After all, hundreds of millions of people world over accuse the US of failing to mind its own business, of interfering and poking its nose where it’s not wanted. And there is also the non-interventionist tradition within American foreign policy, a position that ironically enough emanates from Robert Walpole, Britain’s prime minister from 1721 to 1742, and was later shaped by presidents Jefferson and Monroe. So what will happen? What will…
  • The GOP: More Dust to Eat

    saqib qureshi
    15 Jun 2015 | 8:44 am
    At the heart of the American presidential electoral campaign will be the battle for America’s self-identity. Some 130 million voters will hand in their ballots in 2016 to define what America is, what it stands for and where it is going. Issues of racial, sexual and religious identity will continue to stamp their mark, as they have increasingly done in recent decades. And as American gradually redefines itself, one party is only a slippery slope to annihilation. America’s racial coming of age continues at an incredible pace. In 2000, some 12% of Americans were Hispanics. By 2016, that’s…
  • 3 Things That Every CEO Should Know About Strategy

    saqib qureshi
    25 May 2015 | 7:57 am
    1) Trying to make sense of how things are today, of the universe that the business operates in, is inherently subjective. Objectivity is in fact always subjective. No aspect of our business jumps up at us and identifies itself. We implicitly elect to see our customers as such; or our assets as such; or an investment as such. These are human choices to see aspects of our business in a certain way. The starting point of strategy is therefore as much a personal choice as it reflects what’s happening out there. 2) How we self-identify is the mirror of how we identify everything beyond…
  • Islamic Reform: Beyond the Nasty Alliance

    saqib qureshi
    5 Apr 2015 | 7:21 pm
    Over the last few years, I’ve noticed a small but distinct emergence of a stream of Muslim consciousness that is critical of orthodox Islam. Twenty years ago, I can’t remember coming across a Muslim critique of Islam – certainly not a sharp one. Salman Rushdie’s ‘Satanic Verses’ was provocative, but hardly an analysis or evaluation. Today, it’s almost fashionable for Muslims to poke at Islam…. and the Western media is often only too keen to fan their flames. Much of that emergence owes itself to the support offered by racist, xenophobic Islamophobes who have become notably…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    iai.tv news RSS feed

  • Editorial: Truth, Lies and Deception

    Editor
    12 Jul 2015 | 7:55 am
    We demand honesty as a core value from politicians and lovers alike. Yet small and not-so-small lies have a habit of creeping into our lives. Is it possible to be completely honest – and would this be desirable? Is lying a necessity for life or should we insist on honesty as a means for social cohesion and trusting relationships? In this issue of IAI News, feminist philosopher Rae Langton asks: what, if anything, is wrong with lying? We instinctively assume that lying is wrong, but is there a difference between deception and falsehood? Is lying wrong in and of itself, or only for its…
  • Science: Power and Politics

    John Horgan
    12 Jul 2015 | 6:47 am
    We believe science is rational. But, like the church it once fought, it has its own established power structures and its own politics to defend. Has it become the new church, with beliefs tended by the faithful and heretics excluded from publication? Or is this a travesty of an institution that has brought so much advance?John Horgan is a science journalist and director of the Center for Science Writings at Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey. He was a senior writer at Scientific American from 1986 to 1997, and has also written for The New York Times, National Geographic, Time, and…
  • The Wealth Delusion

    Frances Stewart
    9 Jul 2015 | 3:03 am
    Writing in 1931, the great economist, John Maynard Keynes, thought the major problem of this generation (that of his possible grandchildren) would be how to entertain ourselves, how to live ‘wisely and agreeably and well’ because he thought ‘the economic problem’ would have been solved: we would have enough material goods.  He was talking about Europe, not the poor colonies, of course. And we do have enough: for example, average income in the UK is  around £25,000 or nearly three times the world average, and 60 times that in Afghanistan. We have enough, but Afghanistan and  most…
  • Lying to Survive

    Sophie Van Der Zee
    9 Jul 2015 | 2:58 am
    Humans have been lying for as long as we have been writing – probably longer. Deception is a recurring theme in Greek mythology, with many stories about Dolos (the spirit of trickery and guile) and Apate (the goddess of fraud and deceit). The most famous example may be the trickery and deception involved in invading Troy, when the Greeks pretended to give up on war, leaving a large wooden horse behind on shore that was presented as a peace offering. When the Trojans were fast asleep, the Greek men that were hidden in the Trojan horse snuck out and conquered Troy. Lying is not just something…
  • Of Lies and Necessity

    Rae Langton
    9 Jul 2015 | 2:52 am
    What are lies? To lie is ‘to make a false statement with the intention to deceive’, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, but this might not go far enough. Can you lie with true statements? There is a famous story about St. Athanasius, who, fleeing in disguise, was asked by his pursuers, ‘Have you seen the bishop?’ His canny but truthful response: ‘Continue: he is not far from here.’ Can you lie without statements? Suppose someone asks, ‘Have the officers stopped taking bribes?’ The speaker lies, not by stating something, but by presupposing something, i.e. that the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Universe Inside My Head

  • Why So Cynical?

    Dracomega1
    23 Jul 2015 | 10:13 am
    We’re all so damn cynical these days. How can we not be? So much of our lives have grown to …Continue reading →
  • When Machines Rise

    Dracomega1
    29 Jun 2015 | 3:11 pm
    How screwed are we? Thiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiis ^screwed.Continue reading →
  • A World Of Total Security

    Dracomega1
    26 Jun 2015 | 2:20 pm
    Warning: Satire Ahead A MODEST PROPOSAL FOR PREVENTING TERRORISM IN ALL OF ITS FORMS AND THE FURTHER EXPANSION OF SECURITY …Continue reading →
  • The Cave

    Dracomega1
    24 Jun 2015 | 4:59 pm
    Long ago in a cave somewhere, Lay a tired man with an empty stare. Shackles of steel held him down, …Continue reading →
  • What is the Meaning of Life?

    Dracomega1
    2 Jul 2014 | 12:08 pm
    Since the dawn of humanity, we have always had one question in the back of our minds. Why are we …Continue reading →
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Wiseism

  • How To Make ‘Happy Mistakes’

    The Wiseist
    20 Jul 2015 | 11:05 am
    As a child, I loved watching a certain kids’ TV show about art. It was presented by a softly-spoken, good-natured old guy who would demonstrate how to use watercolours or pastels, or how to draw in proportion. In one episode, the presenter was trying to draw a landscape and accidentally smudged the picture. I’ll never forget what he said. “Let’s turn this into a ‘happy’ mistake.” He then proceeded to smudge the rest of the drawing and turned it into a lovely smudgy sunset. It may have been different from what he set out to do, but it was beautiful all the…
  • Already Successful?…How to Become EPIC!

    The Wiseist
    24 Feb 2015 | 3:51 am
    You don’t have to parade around in Gladiator armour waving a sword to take part in something epic. Nor do you have to snog Leonardo Di Caprio on a sinking ship or run around telling people that frankly you don’t give a damn. The term ‘epic’ is often applied to stories and films which are unapologetically dramatic and, let’s face it, too long to sit through without becoming glaringly aware of how uncomfortable your seat is. But epicness has quite another meaning when it comes to your own life story. Your story may already be a successful one. You may already…
  • Are you a Pochemuchka?

    The Wiseist
    10 Feb 2015 | 2:10 am
    Unless you’re a Russian-speaker, you probably won’t know what I’m on about, but the very fact that you chose to read this blog may mean that you’re a Pochemuchka anyhow. There is no direct translation in English for the Russian word Pochemuchka, which makes me think that maybe there aren’t enough of them in the English-speaking world to warrant the word. In essence, a Pochemuchka is a person who constantly asks questions – someone who always wants to know the reason for things. Now we’ve all encountered that child who, whatever your answer to their…
  • Like A Kit-Kat With No Wafer…Serendipity

    The Wiseist
    6 Feb 2015 | 5:14 am
    What do you feel like when you buy a Kit-Kat, take a bite and discover there is no wafer? Do you scream and shout about the deviance of said chocolate bar? Do you throw it to the floor in disgust? Do you write to Nestle demanding they send you the missing wafer? No? But why don’t you do that? – after all you bought the blinking thing in the first place because it has a wafer, surely? You actively desired the wafer! Otherwise you’d have plumped for a Cadbury’s Dairy Milk or maybe selected a Yorkie (only if you’re a boy, of course). But no, you have a little smile to…
  • Is Your Fitness Focus All Wrong?

    The Wiseist
    6 Feb 2015 | 3:28 am
    There are always a million excuses you can make about why you’re not looking after your body or paying more attention to your health. There’s a lack of time, a lack of motivation, and a general unwillingness to change to a healthier, more wholesome lifestyle. After all, broccoli is not as tasty as cake, a glass of wine is more fun than a glass of water, and if you’ve just finished a long day of work you may be too pooped to pop down the gym. If you’re finding it hard to motivate yourself, or to make wise choices when it comes to health, consider whether your focus may,…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Brighter Everyday

  • Ignoring This Simple Strategy Can Cost Your Blog 10, 000 Subscribers

    Enock Machodi
    26 Jul 2015 | 6:23 pm
    You will agree with me that starting a blog, writing all the quality content by yourself, driving traffic, getting readers to read and comment, and even buy from you isn’t that easy, right? Perhaps it has taken you 5 years or even less to achieve that, and so you treasure your audience. Your blog is… Read More The post Ignoring This Simple Strategy Can Cost Your Blog 10, 000 Subscribers appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • 10 Hidden Blogging Secret Benefits No One will Ever Tell You

    Enock Machodi
    16 Jul 2015 | 7:13 pm
    Blogging has become quite common these days, and just about everyone you happen to meet online is a blogger. It really doesn’t matter whether they are cognizant of this but it’s very true! Posting an update that receives feedback and comments on Facebook makes you a blogger! Sending a tweet that falls short of, or… Read More The post 10 Hidden Blogging Secret Benefits No One will Ever Tell You appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • Blogging Communities Demystified

    Enock Machodi
    6 Jul 2015 | 5:46 pm
    If you’ve been blogging for some time without getting any results; or you’ve just started out, you understand that driving traffic to your blog can be frustrating. It’s even more frustrating if you have a new site. This leaves you with one option – and that’s to depend on traffic from other traffic referral sources.… Read More The post Blogging Communities Demystified appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • Warning Bloggers! Are You Doing This The Wrong Way?

    Enock Machodi
    24 Jun 2015 | 6:17 am
    If you run a blog that has a following, it means you lead a community of like-minded people. They are there because they love what you do. They get value from reading what you write because you help them solve their problems. So you are responsible for engaging community members who frequent your blog by… Read More The post Warning Bloggers! Are You Doing This The Wrong Way? appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • How To Overcome Blogger’s Block By Leveraging PLR Content

    Enock Machodi
    17 Jun 2015 | 5:43 pm
    Blogging should be about giving value to your readers and motivating them to do more. But there are times when you are just unable to come up with brave ideas for your next blog post. And the result is frustration! frustration! frustration! You are left with thoughts that never seem to be ending soon, and… Read More The post How To Overcome Blogger’s Block By Leveraging PLR Content appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Papercuts

  • Why I want to call my daughter Maryam-Lessons learned from the Virgin Birth

    kaytus89
    27 Jul 2015 | 12:50 pm
    When looking for strong female examples, we often forget that the Virgin Mary is not only an important part of Christianity, but is also an important part of Islamic history and heritage. During the process of picking names for my daughter, Maryam- the Arabic/Islamic version of the name Mary- was suggested. But it was only after listening to and reading the story of the virgin birth in the Quran during Ramadan that I felt that the name Maryam had so much significance, beauty and strength. This is what one can learn from the story of the virgin birth. 1-Empowering Women Nothing says girl power…
  • If you’ve ever treated an Indian worker as an inferior you must read this book- Shantaram Review

    kaytus89
    25 Jul 2015 | 6:43 am
    Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts Any reader of Gregory David Roberts’ Shantaram would undoubtedly be shocked by the dark and violent content of the book. Based on his own experience as an escaped Australian convict who was taken in by a mafia in Bombay, the novel depicts the gritty underworld of organised crime. Death, disease and exploitation are common and reoccurring themes throughout the novel; and we gain insight into the world or more accurately, the ‘underworld’ of junkies, assassins, prostitutes, gangsters, thieves and mafias. But what is most striking about this world, is its…
  • I do NOT eat haram chicken

    kaytus89
    21 Jul 2015 | 7:58 am
    If you’re living in any of the Gulf countries, then the wave of anti-Brazilian chicken is nothing new. The paranoia about the halal nature of imported poultry has become an outright hysteria that has led to many individuals to completely abstain from eating any Brazilian chicken including the famous Sadia brand. Those who are trusting enough to eat and buy Sadia chicken are accused of being lax with their halal diet and eating ‘haram’ products; and restaurants are quickly labelled as ‘haram’. I cannot count the times I’ve been in the presence of some…
  • Girls are better than boys, and this is why (Safwa Stories)

    kaytus89
    15 Jun 2015 | 12:54 pm
    The Tale of Boys and Girls  There once lived two brothers. The first  conceived several boys and mocked his brother for only fathering girls. One day, during a gathering, a friend of the daughters-only sibling suggested to his saddened friend that the next time he is mocked, he should suggest that his younger daughter and the eldest son of his brother travel together in order to discover which of the two is better and more successful.   Soon after this, the daughters-only sibling was mocked by his brother again for only conceiving girls and so the traveling plan was brought up. The…
  • Creepy Saudi Bedtime Stories- the real Cinderella story

    kaytus89
    1 Jun 2015 | 8:36 am
    You  may recognise several aspects of this story, but you’ll be surprised by some of the disturbing twists: There was once a young girl called Fatima who lived with her stepmother. As in all Cinderella stories, she was constantly mistreated  and in charge of all the cooking and housework. One day, she was given 7 fish to clean in the springs for their dinner. She began her work but to her surprise one of the fish slipped from her fingers and began to talk. ‘Please, let me go and I’ll make you rich’. Fatima was frightened by the fish but even more so at the prospect…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ashish Dalela

  • The Theological Problem of Falldown

    adalela
    23 Jul 2015 | 12:59 am
    I generally refrain from commenting on theological topics, and restrict myself to issues in science, but in this post I will make an exception. The issue of interest is whether a soul “falls down” into matter. There is often confusion around this topic, which, in my view, rests upon a misunderstanding about nature of knowledge about our past. There are three broad theological views on this issue: (a) the soul is an individual; he falls down into matter and can get out of it; (b) the soul is an individual but has always been in matter, although he can get out of the material…
  • Properties, Values, and Measurements

    adalela
    10 Jul 2015 | 10:59 pm
    One of the problems that has repeatedly bothered me for the last decade is the distinction between physical properties, their measurements, and the values of properties that are discovered during measurement. I have flip-flopped in my understanding of the nature of the problem and what might be a viable solution. I will use this post to describe the problem and what I believe is the best way to resolve it. I will also connect the solution to ideas about the nature of perception and reality in Indian philosophy. But before I begin, let’s take a closer look at how science presently…
  • Models and Reality

    adalela
    11 Jun 2015 | 7:16 am
    During recent online conversations with several commentators, I heard an oft repeated refrain about science: science is only a model, it has nothing to do with reality; our models may get closer to reality over time, but we have no way of knowing that they have gotten to reality, nor do we know that they will eventually get there. I was taken aback by this line of argument, because I thought we still had some faith in something. I personally could not imagine an existence in which faithlessness pervades our minds to an extent that we treat all possibility of knowing truth as impossible, and…
  • The Broken Watchmaker

    adalela
    9 Jun 2015 | 5:29 am
    Even a broken watch tells the correct time twice in a day.  However, to know that the watch is broken, we must observe it when it tells the time incorrectly rather than when it tells it correctly. This analogy is a useful way to understand the problem in modern science, because clearly there are times in which science makes correct predictions. Those who argue that science works only look at science when it seems to work correctly. To know that they are looking at a broken watch, they would have to look at it when its predictions break down — either because the prediction…
  • Scientific Method – Does it Deliver Truth?

    adalela
    4 Jun 2015 | 8:50 pm
    The below is a modified version of a response I wrote recently on Google+ in response to a question about the conflict between reason and faith. The response is also detailed in my recent book Uncommon Wisdom. This essay will argue that the manner in which science has construed the use of reason (and experience) – i.e., the path to discovery – cannot deliver truth. There is, however, another notion about reason which works in conjunction with faith to verify rather than discover the truth. Faith and reason are contradictory when reason is defined as the method of truth…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    unveiling the reality

  • ANGER AND LACK OF FREEDOM SHARE THE SAME ROOTS

    Juan A. Hernández
    16 Jul 2015 | 4:08 pm
    This title might be confusing to the reader. Could such different aspects of the human nature share the same roots?. I am intending with this post to prove that this is the case. If we unveiled such roots, then the questions would be: could we use that knowledge in a practical way?, could we get cured from anger and lack of freedom with the same pill?. I invite the reader to follow next reflections and find out how I address the previous matters by introducing what I call “freedom meditation”. Fig.1 Anger and freedom, two sides of the same coin WHAT SAVED YOU ONCE CAN KILL YOU A HUNDRED…
  • UNVEILING LIES. THE SCHOPENHAUER’S FILTER

    Juan A. Hernández
    31 May 2015 | 3:13 pm
    The idea for this post came up one day watching a political debate on the TV. The right wing candidate was standing for a statement while the left wing candidate was, obviously, standing for the opposing statement. The arguments used by both candidates looked well built, from the logical point of view. I wondered then, how it was possible that two radically opposing positions could be laid on correct logical foundations. Could be two opposing positions right at the same time?, was there any hidden trick in that debate?. This post is about filtering lies, or incorrect reasoning looking…
  • ON HOW STATISTICAL MECHANICS CAN MAKE YOU HAPPIER

    Juan A. Hernández
    19 Apr 2015 | 3:16 am
    7000 MILLIONS OF DEFINITIONS OF HAPPINESS When I first decided to write on happiness and goal achievement, the first thing I wondered was, why 7000 millions of human beings living on planet earth have such a small set of goals in life. Some of these goals might be “I want to raise my children and provide them with a good quality of life”, “I want to get as much money as possible”, “I want to survive and minimize my effort by getting others to work for me”, “I want my soccer team to win the league” or “I want my mother-in-law to get dumb”, among a few others. Whatever the…
  • REALITY IS A COMPLEX OBJECT (II)

    Juan A. Hernández
    6 Mar 2015 | 10:20 am
    Welcome back to this blog. This month, I will be looking at the remaining points I left out from the first part of the post “REALITY IS A COMPLEX OBJECT”. In the first part, I explained the reasons behind the denial of complexity. I also talked about Plato’s allegory and his view on the human observation process of Reality. Then, I proceeded to introduce a series of reasons why Plato could be right, when he stated that the human observation of Reality is incomplete. The first reason was the existence of a possible dimensional mismatch between the real object to be measured and the…
  • Reality is a complex object (I)

    Juan A. Hernández
    23 Dec 2014 | 3:19 pm
    THE DENIAL OF COMPLEXITY HIDES OUR FEAR OF UNCERTAINTY Human beings do not withstand uncertainty very well. Uncertainty induces stress since our minds need to explain everything happening around us. It has been proved that when something occurs, and it is not easily explained by turning to our model of the world, an area in our brain called “left anterior cingulate cortex” (ACC) gets activated. This area would be responsible for conflict detection. On the other hand, another area in the brain gets activated, the so-called “dorsolateral prefrontal cortex” (DLPFC), which would be…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Universe Inside My Head

  • Why So Cynical?

    Dracomega1
    23 Jul 2015 | 10:13 am
    We’re all so damn cynical these days. How can we not be? So much of our lives have grown to …Continue reading →
  • When Machines Rise

    Dracomega1
    29 Jun 2015 | 3:11 pm
    How screwed are we? Thiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiis ^screwed.Continue reading →
  • A World Of Total Security

    Dracomega1
    26 Jun 2015 | 2:20 pm
    Warning: Satire Ahead A MODEST PROPOSAL FOR PREVENTING TERRORISM IN ALL OF ITS FORMS AND THE FURTHER EXPANSION OF SECURITY …Continue reading →
  • The Cave

    Dracomega1
    24 Jun 2015 | 4:59 pm
    Long ago in a cave somewhere, Lay a tired man with an empty stare. Shackles of steel held him down, …Continue reading →
  • What is the Meaning of Life?

    Dracomega1
    2 Jul 2014 | 12:08 pm
    Since the dawn of humanity, we have always had one question in the back of our minds. Why are we …Continue reading →
Log in