Philosophy

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  • The Biological Notion of Self and Non-self

    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
    Alfred Tauber
    21 May 2015 | 6:12 pm
    [Revised entry by Alfred Tauber on May 21, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Fundamental to biology are (1) defining the characteristics of identity, which distinguish individual organisms from those of similar kind, and (2) describing the mechanisms that defend organisms from their predators. Immunology is the science devoted to these problems. A progeny of late 19th-century microbiology and the clinical discipline of infectious diseases, immunology did not attain a formal theoretical construction until after World War II, when "the self" was introduced as the conceptual foundation…
  • Is the doctoral thesis obsolete?

    Leiter Reports: A Philosophy Blog
    Brian Leiter
    21 May 2015 | 3:16 pm
    Interesting item from the UK, with a particular focus on the dissertation options at Oxford Philosophy. (Thanks to Mark van Atten for the pointer.)
  • Capitalism and culture

    Leiter Reports: A Philosophy Blog
    Brian Leiter
    21 May 2015 | 1:41 pm
    An undergraduate student writes: You've linked to two articles by Todd Gitlin recently. Both indicate troubling characteristics of college students that are possibly (at least in part) attributable to the influence that capitalism exerts on American culture (e.g. freshmen are...
  • Tune In to NYU Bioethics Workshop Live Broadcast!

    Ethics Etc
    S. Matthew Liao
    21 May 2015 | 3:01 pm
    Can’t travel to NYC for the NYU Workshop on Current Controversies in Bioethics? You will be able to tune in to a live broadcast of the workshop tomorrow at 1pm! Links to the broadcast will be posted on Twitter, Facebook, and here on Ethics Etc.
  • Pew report links poorly paid adjuncts, student debt and high presidents’pay.

    Feminist Philosophers
    annejjacobson
    20 May 2015 | 10:03 am
    H/t to someone on FB. My apologies for not remembering who. In addition, the incoming U of Texas president refused a million dollar salary and took $750K instead.
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    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

  • The Biological Notion of Self and Non-self

    Alfred Tauber
    21 May 2015 | 6:12 pm
    [Revised entry by Alfred Tauber on May 21, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Fundamental to biology are (1) defining the characteristics of identity, which distinguish individual organisms from those of similar kind, and (2) describing the mechanisms that defend organisms from their predators. Immunology is the science devoted to these problems. A progeny of late 19th-century microbiology and the clinical discipline of infectious diseases, immunology did not attain a formal theoretical construction until after World War II, when "the self" was introduced as the conceptual foundation…
  • Johannes Kepler

    Daniel A. Di Liscia
    21 May 2015 | 4:18 pm
    [Revised entry by Daniel A. Di Liscia on May 21, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Johannes Kepler (1571 - 1630) is one of the most significant representatives of the so-called Scientific Revolution of the 16th and 17th centuries. Although he received only the basic training of a "magister" and was professionally oriented towards theology at the beginning of his career, he rapidly became known for his mathematical skills and theoretical creativity. As a convinced Copernican, Kepler was able to...
  • Temporal Logic

    Valentin Goranko and Antony Galton
    20 May 2015 | 5:08 pm
    [Revised entry by Valentin Goranko and Antony Galton on May 20, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The term Temporal Logic has been broadly used to cover all approaches to representation and reasoning about time and temporal information within a logical framework, and also more narrowly to refer specifically to the modal-logic type of approach introduced around 1960 by Arthur Prior under the name of Tense Logic and subsequently developed further by many logicians and computer scientists. Applications of Temporal Logic include its use as a formalism for clarifying philosophical issues…
  • Giambattista della Porta

    Sergius Kodera
    19 May 2015 | 4:52 pm
    [New Entry by Sergius Kodera on May 19, 2015.] To most modern readers, it would stretch definitions to include someone like Giovan Battista Della Porta (1535 - 1615) in an encyclopedia of philosophy. In a typical assessment of Porta's Magia Naturalis, Wayne Shumaker writes: Occasionally [Porta] shows that he has actually experimented, as in writing about the lodestone or burning-glasses. On the whole, however, the treatise is backward-looking. (1972: 120)...
  • Finitism in Geometry

    Jean Paul Van Bendegem
    18 May 2015 | 6:29 pm
    [Revised entry by Jean Paul Van Bendegem on May 18, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, supplement.html] In our representations of the world, especially in physics, (mathematical) infinities play a crucial role. The continuum of the real numbers, (Re), as a representation of time or of one-dimensional space is surely the best known example and, by extension, the (n)-fold cartesian product, (Re^{n}), for (n)-dimensional space. However, these same infinities also cause problems. One just has to think about Zeno's paradoxes or the present-day continuation of that discussion, namely the…
 
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    Talking Philosophy

  • Mistakes

    Mike LaBossiere
    22 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com If you have made a mistake, do not be afraid of admitting the fact and amending your ways. -Confucius   I never make the same mistake twice. Unfortunately, there are an infinite number of mistakes. So, I keep making new ones. Fortunately, philosophy is rather helpful in minimizing the impact of mistakes and learning that crucial aspect of wisdom: not committing the same error over and over. One key aspect to avoiding the repetition of errors is skill in critical thinking. While critical thinking has become something of a buzz-word bloated fad, the core of it…
  • Secrecy & Lawmaking

    Mike LaBossiere
    20 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) has generated considerable controversy, mostly over what people think it might do. While making prediction about such complex matters is always difficult, there is a somewhat unusual challenge in making such prediction about the TPP. This challenge is that it is being kept secret from the public. While senators are allowed to read the text of the TPP, it is being treated like an ultra-secret document. To gaze upon it, a senator must go to a secure basement room, hand over all electronics and then leave behind any notes he (or…
  • The Challenge of Attendance

    Mike LaBossiere
    18 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com I recently attended a meeting discussing the use of Blackboard Analytics as a tool for student retention and improving graduation rates. Last year I had attended multiple meetings on the subject of classes with high failure rates and this had motivated me to formalize what I had been doing informally for years, namely generating a picture of why students fail my classes. While my university is still implementing Blackboard analytics, I have gathered information from my classes and my students which has enabled me to get a reasonable picture of the failure rates,…
  • Bulk Data Collection

    Mike LaBossiere
    15 May 2015 | 5:00 am
      View image | gettyimages.com A federal appeals court ruled in May, 2015 that the NSA’s bulk collection of domestic calling data is illegal. While such bulk data collection would strike many as blatantly unconstitutional, this matter has not been addressed, though that is perhaps just a matter of time. My intent is to address the general issue of bulk domestic data collection by the state in a principled way. When it comes to the state (or, more accurately, the people who compose the state) using its compulsive force against its citizens, there are three main areas of concern:…
  • Law Enforcement as Revenue Stream

    Mike LaBossiere
    11 May 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com After the financial class melted down the world economy, local governments faced an obvious reduction in their revenues. As the economy recovered under a Democrat President, the Republicans held onto or gained power in many state governments, such as my own adopted state of Florida. With laudable consistency with their professed ideology, Republicans routinely cut taxes for businesses, the well off and sometimes even almost everyone. While the theory seems to be that cutting taxes will increase the revenue for state and local governments, shockingly the opposite…
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    Leiter Reports: A Philosophy Blog

  • Is attrition from a graduate program necessarily a bad thing?

    Brian Leiter
    22 May 2015 | 7:38 am
    A senior philosopher at another top program (not Michigan) e-mailed an interesting question about attrition; she writes: [Y]our most recent post raises a question that might be worth discussing, namely whether all grad school attrition is a bad thing, and...
  • Is the doctoral thesis obsolete?

    Brian Leiter
    21 May 2015 | 3:16 pm
    Interesting item from the UK, with a particular focus on the dissertation options at Oxford Philosophy. (Thanks to Mark van Atten for the pointer.)
  • Capitalism and culture

    Brian Leiter
    21 May 2015 | 1:41 pm
    An undergraduate student writes: You've linked to two articles by Todd Gitlin recently. Both indicate troubling characteristics of college students that are possibly (at least in part) attributable to the influence that capitalism exerts on American culture (e.g. freshmen are...
  • On doing philosophy of disability when you have a disability

    Brian Leiter
    21 May 2015 | 6:35 am
    MOVING TO FRONT FROM YESTERDAY, AN INTERESTING DISCUSSION IN THE COMMENTS; MORE CONTRIBUTIOSN WELCOME Stefan Sciaraffa (McMaster) calls my attention to a striking item by philosopher Elizabeth Barnes (Virginia); an excerpt: I have sat in philosophy seminars where it was...
  • "Marx, Law, Ideology, Legal Positivism"

    Brian Leiter
    21 May 2015 | 6:20 am
    The published version, for those who are interested.
 
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    Ethics Etc

  • Tune In to NYU Bioethics Workshop Live Broadcast!

    S. Matthew Liao
    21 May 2015 | 3:01 pm
    Can’t travel to NYC for the NYU Workshop on Current Controversies in Bioethics? You will be able to tune in to a live broadcast of the workshop tomorrow at 1pm! Links to the broadcast will be posted on Twitter, Facebook, and here on Ethics Etc.
  • Program for Current Controversies in Bioethics at NYU

    S. Matthew Liao
    20 May 2015 | 8:24 am
    Please find below the program for the NYU Center for Bioethics workshop on “Current Controversies in Bioethics.” Friday, May 22, 2015 NYU Silver Center, 1st Floor Jurow Hall, 100 Washington Square East, NY, NY 10003 1:00 PM-3:00 PM—Session 1 (Psychopathy, Autism, and Capacities for Responsible Agency) “An Exploration of Moral Competence through Autism, Psychopathy, and […]
  • Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights Now Out!

    S. Matthew Liao
    5 May 2015 | 6:09 pm
    Our book, Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights, which Rowan Cruft, Massimo Renzo, and I edited, just came out! You can get a copy in the UK from major outlets such as OUP UK and Amazon UK. In the US, you can get the Kindle and Nook versions now. The print version for the US market […]
  • Earth Week Podcast: Cat Eyes for Climate Change

    S. Matthew Liao
    20 Apr 2015 | 10:35 pm
    In celebration of Earth Week, readers of Ethics Etc might be interested in a podcast I did with The Adaptors called “Cat Eyes for Climate Change.” You can find the podcast here: http://www.theadaptors.org/episodes/2015/2/11/cat-eyes-for-climate-cha nge and on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cat-eyes-for-climate-change/id9608 40471?i=335303274&mt=2 You can also listen to it directly here:
  • NYU Workshop on Current Controversies in Bioethics

    S. Matthew Liao
    15 Apr 2015 | 8:08 pm
    Date: Friday, May 22nd-Saturday, May 23, 2015 Location: Jurow Hall, NYU Silver Center, 100 Washington Square East Time: TBA Bioethics is the study of ethical issues arising out of advances in the life sciences and medicine. The NYU Center for Bioethics is hosting a workshop with thirteen significant figures in Bioethics who will pair up […]
 
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    Feminist Philosophers

  • UK academics: Pension Consultation Ends TODAY!

    jennysaul
    22 May 2015 | 3:57 am
    If you haven’t yet, please go register your views here. One key feature of the proposed changes likely to be of interest to blog readers is the change from final salary to average salary as determination of pension level. Members of under-represented groups often have slower career advancement, so this change will be particularly damaging.
  • Symptoms of depression given letter grades

    magicalersatz
    21 May 2015 | 10:07 am
    Josh Parsons (Oxford) has started a webpage in which he – following up on his previous work with flags – gives letter grades to the symptoms of depression. Parsons describes the project as follows: I have suffered from depression on and off since 2012 and probably a lot longer. In 2012 I came under a lot of stress, had a meltdown worse than any I’d had before, at a time when I couldn’t afford to just take time off to deal with it myself, and went to see my doctor, then a psychiatrist, then a therapist, and ended up taking sick leave from my job, a course of anti-depressants…
  • Sexism in “Oxford Today”?

    annejjacobson
    20 May 2015 | 12:07 pm
    It’s the Oxford glossy; this one for Trinity Term. In the section “Common Room”, which features book essays and Reviews, all 13 reviews are about books by men. There is an essay about a book by a man and a woman. In other news, the sun rose this morning.
  • “One Hundred Years of Fortitude”

    annejjacobson
    20 May 2015 | 10:39 am
    The post title is also the title the NY Times gives to a piece about Carmen Herrera, one of the six artists who are “A very small sampling of the female artists now in their 70s, 80s and 90s we should have known about decades ago.”  The look at the six women is a wonderful and stunning interactive piece. Carmen Herrera, 99, a regal Giacometti-thin woman with bone-white hair, could be the poster child for late-in-life recognition. Her work will be included in the Whitney Museum of American Art’s much-anticipated show this month, inaugurating its new building at the foot of the…
  • Pew report links poorly paid adjuncts, student debt and high presidents’pay.

    annejjacobson
    20 May 2015 | 10:03 am
    H/t to someone on FB. My apologies for not remembering who. In addition, the incoming U of Texas president refused a million dollar salary and took $750K instead.
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    In Socrates' Wake

  • College Success Books?

    Nathan Nobis
    4 May 2015 | 6:11 am
    Has anyone ever assigned a "college success" or "how to be a successful college student"-type book in any of their classes and has any recommendations on good ones? Many are available and I am wondering there are any that anyone has found to be especially useful in providing guidance for students about how to do better in college. Thanks!
  • CFP: Children, Food, and Philosophy

    Michael Cholbi
    28 Apr 2015 | 11:31 am
    CALL FOR PAPERSThe American Philosophical Association Committee for Pre-College Instruction in Philosophy (CPIP) is sponsoring a session on Children, Food, and Philosophy to be held at the APA Eastern Division Meeting January 6-9, 2016 in Washington, D.C. The CPIP invites presentation proposals about the intersection between children and food. This may include any of the following topics: ethics and food, food justice from farm to table, food activism, the aesthetics of food, local food, the global food system, or food and health.Send title of presentation, abstract (500 words), and…
  • Handfield: Reflections on the Flipped Classroom

    Michael Cholbi
    28 Apr 2015 | 11:27 am
    A guest post from Toby Handfield, Monash University:There is much buzz around my university at the moment about the promise of the flipped classroom. The idea is that the lecture is not an effective method of delivering content, relative to the alternatives we now have. We can deliver content better via videos, Khan academy style, and we can then use our class time for more interactive work with students. Give them questions, have them complete assignments in class, work with them one on one, or get them into small group discussions. So content delivery becomes homework; homework…
  • Announcing new Wilson Prize for essay on philosophy teaching

    Michael Cholbi
    17 Apr 2015 | 12:00 pm
    REMINDER: The submission deadline is October 1, 2015.Teaching Philosophy is pleased to announce a new essay prize, the Arnold Wilson Prize. Details here and below the fold. Teaching Philosophy is pleased to announced the establishment of the Arnold Wilson Prize. The prize will be awarded within one year of a topic being announced for the best essay concerning an issue related to the significance, goals, or nature of philosophy teaching. The winning essay will receive a $1,000 prize, along with publication in Teaching Philosophy. Entries besides the essay selected for the…
  • Subscribing to Teaching Philosophy

    Michael Cholbi
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:29 am
    I've been posting information about the contents of Teaching Philosophy for a while, but you may not know how to subscribe. The basic information is here, but a rundown:Members of the American Association of Philosophy Teachers receive online access free with membership.Annual print subscriptions are $33, $40 for online, $53 or online and print.Institutional subscriptions are (as expected). But I'd encourage your libraries to subscribe so that all of your faculty and students have access.
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    Philosophy by the Way

  • Caught in your mind

    17 May 2015 | 4:35 pm
    Some people are caught in their minds. They don’t have flexibility in the way they think. As things have done in the past, so they must be done in the future. Or once they have developed ideas how things should be arranged in the world, about what is good and what is wrong, they stick to it and they are not open to the fact that many people in the world think otherwise, about details or about the mainlines or about both. “I am right or my group is right and the others are wrong, a little bit or completely.” They cannot ignore those who have different opinions and probably they cannot…
  • The meaning of the ordinary

    30 Apr 2015 | 4:26 pm
    At the end of my last blog I wrote that selfies are seldom taken when you feel bad. Usually it is so that photos are taken of themes with a positive meaning; themes that are more than simply neutral let alone negative. Selfies, and by and large photos taken of yourself (and of other people not being you), don’t say: “That’s me ...” but “That’s me!” This is just an instance of a common characteristic of much photography. As Pierre Bourdieu analysed so well in his famous book An art moyen (A mean art), “You don’t photograph what you have before you all days” (p. 57). Or…
  • Your selfie and your soul

    26 Apr 2015 | 4:03 pm
    The image is the reflection of the soulIn his Philosophical Investigations Wittgenstein writes: “The human body is the best picture of the human soul.” (Part II, iv) In that context Wittgenstein gives the word “soul” a religious meaning, discussing the view that “[r]eligion teaches that the soul can exist when the body has disintegrated.” (ibid.) However, I think that we can give “soul” also a wider meaning, for example we can read it as “mind” or as “inner life”. Seen that way the idea expressed in the first quotation is in agreement with recent discoveries in…
  • Self in the era of selfie

    19 Apr 2015 | 4:30 pm
    SelfieToday we live in the era of images. Originally, making images was a real craft left to professional painters. With the arrival of photography (and film, but here I’ll talk only about photography), at first not so much changed. Making images was still left to professionals – photographers who mainly worked in studios – and a few exceptional hobbyists. This changed with the production of the Brownie camera by Kodak in 1900 and the introduction of the Leica 35 mm camera 25 years later. Now everybody could become a photographer, and indeed, more and more people took a camera in their…
  • The body and the self (2)

    12 Apr 2015 | 4:38 pm
    It's meWhen I saw someone yesterday and today I think that I see her again over there but I am not sure of it, I try to remember in detail how the woman I saw yesterday looked like and I compare her with the woman I see now, and then I draw my conclusion: She is the same person or she isn’t. However, when I can ask her “Is it possible that it were you whom I saw yesterday at the bus stop?”, I do not expect that she tries to bring up from her mind a physical description of a person at the bus stop yesterday and compares it with her appearance and then says: “Yes, it was me” or “No,…
 
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    The Brooks Blog

  • Inspirational Academic Award

    21 May 2015 | 9:44 am
    Delighted to say I'm runner-up for the inaugural Inspirational Academic Award from Durham Students' Union - a university-wide award. Last year, I won their Lecturer of the Year Award for my Faculty. Further delighted to see one of our Durham Law students is shortlisted for an award, too.
  • Magna Carta panel at St Andrews

    20 May 2015 | 3:22 am
    Many thanks to the Centre for Global Constitutionalism at the University of St Andrews for inviting me to speak on their special panel commemorating the 800th anniversary of the signing of the Magna Carta entitled ‘Magna Carta: A Global Charter of Liberty for the 21stCentury? Roundtable Discussion’. The event took place yesterday at the University of St Andrews and hosted by the School of International Relations’s Centre for Global Constitutionalism.  The panel was chaired by Professor Nick Rengger (Head, School of International Relations, St Andrews). My other…
  • The election lesson we must learn is relevance

    19 May 2015 | 3:57 pm
    . . . is the title of my latest post for LabourList. A small taste:"I believe part of this project of renewal should focus on Labour as the party of union: of trade unions, of the union of our United Kingdom and of the European Union. Ed Miliband has suffered more criticism than deserved, but one idea he has right is One Nation Labour. You can already see George Osborne talking explicitly about One Nation politics in his pursuit of Northern ‘powerhouses’. Labour is better placed to be a One Nation party committed to defending union. Making this case relevant to everyday life is a major…
  • How will the Labour Party choose its next leader?

    15 May 2015 | 5:33 am
    This received from the Labour Party in the last few minutes: Hi Thom, Soon, you’ll be able to vote for the next Leader and Deputy Leader of our party. Below is a guide to how and when it will happen. If you have any questions not answered here, get in touch with us at the email address at the bottom and we’ll try to get back to you. 1. You have one vote to cast for your choice of Leader and another for your choice of Deputy LeaderUnlike previous leadership elections, this election will be held on a one-person-one-vote basis. There are three sets of people who can vote: Labour Party…
  • Thom Brooks @ thombrooks.info

    14 May 2015 | 2:06 pm
    My personal website - thombrooks.info - has been overhauled and relaunched using WordPress. It has information on my key publications, media appearances, speaking engagements and work with the Labour Party. READ MORE HERE.
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    Jon Cogburn's Blog

  • I've moved over to philpercs

    Jon Cogburn
    16 May 2015 | 10:03 am
    Philpercs is up and running and my blogging will be over there from this point forward.  Joe Bob says check it out.
  • Blog Interregnum and Forthcoming New Group Blog

    Jon Cogburn
    16 Mar 2015 | 4:38 pm
    [Updates: (1) Thus far, in addition to me and the Rochas, we also have Mark Silcox, Neal Hebert, J. Edward Hackett, Charles Pence, Tiffany Cvrkel, BP Morton, Debbie Goldgaber, Olufemi Taiwo, Duncan Richter, Stephen C. Finley, Tristan Haze and one or two more forthcoming authors that will be added here. (2) We've decided that the go date will be around May 13th., (3) our reason for being and general policies are up here.] With the amount of work I'm putting into my book on Tristan Garcia and am about to undertake on the new edition of the Martin philosophy of language book with…
  • New Philosophers' Carnival (#173)

    Jon Cogburn
    16 Mar 2015 | 3:13 pm
    Philosopher's Carnival #173 is HERE. Kudos to The University of Newcastle's Samuel Douglas for hosting.
  • Why is Randy Orton saving John Stewart?

    Jon Cogburn
    3 Mar 2015 | 1:01 pm
    In this post I covered Acts I and II of the John Stewart/Seth Rollins feud. In Act III Seth Rollins went on TMZ Hollywood Sports to respond to Stewart's promo: Then, Act II, Rollins upped the ante by showing up on Stewart's own turf: And, finally, the denouement. And I must say that Stewart's appearance on WWE's Monday Night Raw was certainly my moment of Zen: I love how Seth Rollins' flunkies laughed at his jokes and he told them to shut up whenever they hammed it up too much. Really first-rate, classic heel behavior. I can't quite figure out why Randy Orton was the…
  • Review of Garcia's Form and Object in Dialogue

    Jon Cogburn
    2 Mar 2015 | 5:48 pm
    This review by York University's Daniel F.J. Siksay is pretty gratifying. If you can't make it past the pay-wall and want a copy, just e-mail me and I'll send you one. Helping Mark Allan Ohm translate Garcia's magnum opus was probably the second hardest thing (after caring for a newborn) I've yet done, and it's tremendously validating to get a pat on the shoulder as well as to see that other people agree with me that it was not time wasted. To be clear, if you had to translate a one hundred seventy thousand plus word metaphysics tome from its original French, you could…
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    Stephen Law

  • Science, Reason and Skepticism - from Wiley Blackwell Handbook to Humanism (just out)

    13 May 2015 | 5:08 am
    (unedited draft, not final copy)Science, Reason and Skepticism[1]Stephen LawWhat are science and reason?Humanists expound the virtues of science and reason. But what are science and reason? And why should we think it wise to rely on them? By science, I mean that approach to finding out about reality based on the scientific method. This is a method that was fully developed only a few hundred years ago (though of course we find elements being applied even in the ancient world)). Science, as I’ll use the term here, is a comparatively recent invention[AC1] , its development owing a great…
  • Skeptical Theism - primer for the uninitiated

    8 May 2015 | 7:06 am
    Heard of skeptical theism? Perhaps not. But it's all the rage in certain religious circles. So, to get you up to speed, here's a quick primer.There's a good chance your religious opponent will be familiar with skeptical theism and will use against you in an argument about the existence of God.  So it's wise to be prepared.Continues here....
  • Angry at God

    6 May 2015 | 5:40 am
    Stephen Maitzen has an interesting paper here. The final paragraph is amusing and spot on:Living in a society still dominated by an inherited theistic outlook, atheists like me are not infrequently accused of being “angry at God” and venting our anger in the form of arguments such as those I’ve offered here. The accusation is patronizing, question-begging, and false. Any atheist who can think straight knows that anger at God makes no sense. I’m no more “angry at God” than I’m angry at Santa Claus for failing to relieve me of the burden of Christmas shopping. If I’m angry at…
  • CFI UK EVENT: Event Title: Searching for Satan: Miscarriages of memory, fractured families and Satanic panics

    19 Apr 2015 | 5:39 am
    (Photo: Wikipedia/Creative Commons; design: Lauren Wade)Centre for Inquiry UK and Anomalistic Psychology research Unit, Goldsmiths present:Searching for Satan: Miscarriages of memory, fractured families and Satanic panicsDiscover how the unreliability of memory has led to grave miscarriages of justice, including panics about Satanic abuse. Can memories really be ‘recovered’ by therapists? To what extent can we rely on the memories of witnesses in historic abuse cases? Some deeply disturbing cases will be investigated.6th June 2015Venue: Room LG02 in the Professor Stuart Hall Building…
  • RELIGIOUS EPISTEMOLOGY: A CONFERENCE FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC AT HEYTHROP COLLEGE

    19 Apr 2015 | 4:25 am
    The Royal Institute of Philosophy presents RELIGIOUS EPISTEMOLOGY:A CONFERENCE FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC AT HEYTHROP COLLEGE19th and 20th June 2015Heythrop College, University of London, Kensington Square, London W8 5HN (very close to Kensington High St. tube)Funds for video-recording talks have been provided by The Templeton Foundation.This is a free, two-day conference aimed at the general public. It makes accessible some of the exciting, cutting edge work recently done in religious epistemology. All speakers are leading figures in the field (two are flying in specially from the States).Talks…
 
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    gonepublic: philosophy, politics, & public life

  • philoSOPHIA 2015 at Emory May 14-16, 2015

    Noelle McAfee
    10 May 2015 | 5:56 pm
    philoSOPHIA 2015 Ninth Annual Conference The Neolithic to the Neoliberal: Communities Human and Non-Human Emory University Atlanta, GA May 14-16, 2015 Local Hosts: Cynthia Willett | Noëlle McAfee | Erin Tarver Graduate Assistant: Lilyana Levy Keynote Speakers: Drucilla Cornell | Lisa Guenther & Chloë Taylor | Kelly Oliver Many Thanks to our Generous Sponsors: Subvention Fund, Hightower Fund, Emory Center for Ethics, Department of Philosophy, Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of African American Studies, Department of…
  • epistemic deliberative theory

    Noelle McAfee
    25 Feb 2015 | 7:13 pm
    Advocates of epistemic deliberative democracy point to deliberations’ propensity to track the truth.  Could someone please explain to me what truth there is to track on political matters, which by their very nature are political because no one can agree on a truth that would adjudicate the matter? This seems folly from top to bottom.
  • philoSOPHIA Conference at Emory May 14-16, 2015

    Noelle McAfee
    17 Feb 2015 | 6:34 pm
    I’m helping organize the 9th Annual Meeting of the feminist philosophy society, philoSOPHIA.  The lineup is amazing…. philoSOPHIA 2015 9th Annual Conference The Neolithic to the Neoliberal: Communities Human and Non-Human Emory University Atlanta, GA May 14-16, 2015 Local Hosts: Cynthia Willett | Noëlle McAfee | Erin Tarver Keynote Speakers: Drucilla Cornell | Lisa Guenther & Chloë Taylor | Kelly Oliver Preliminary Program: Thursday May 14: 5:00-7:00 Check-in and Registration at Emory Conference Center Hotel 7:00- 9:00 Welcome and Opening Remarks, Carla Freeman, Emory…
  • Richard Rorty 1997 on Democracy and Philosophy

    Noelle McAfee
    16 Jan 2015 | 4:53 pm
    When I was a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin in the 1990s, I was an occasional guest host on a public affairs program of the local PBS station. In 1997 I interviewed the philosopher Richard Rorty. This afternoon, with the help of Emory graduate student Karen McCarthy, I finally got around to digitizing it. Then we uploaded it to YouTube.  It’s kind of eery watching it again.  So many of the issues Rorty and I discussed are still with us today in the clash of cultures between religion and secularism, attempts at democratization in the Middle East versus the…
  • Neoliberalism and the Mail

    Noelle McAfee
    5 Jan 2015 | 6:46 pm
    The conservative / neoliberal attack on public sector enterprises, namely the United States Postal Service, has worked so well that now I, a leftie, am hating the US Postal Service.  They are clearly understaffed and so I see mail carriers trying to deliver the goods as late as 8 p.m.  God bless them. But when I want a package delivered on time — or delivered at all  (first world problem) — they are no where to be found  And if during a lull time I get through to customer service in under 20 minutes, I get a non-answer.  And so, personally, I’ll go with a privatized…
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    Alexander Pruss's Blog

  • Miracles, visible and hidden

    20 May 2015 | 11:33 am
    We would expect God intervene a lot in our world to prevent misery. But there are at least three things that could give God reason limit his interventions:The value of our trusting in him without being overwhelmed by the obviousness of his interventions. The danger that we would end up counting on miracles, which would undermine our motivations for helping others. The intrinsic value of the world proceeding according to its natural course. Notice, however, that considerations (1) and (2) only apply to evident miracles, though (3) applies to all. Thus while God always has general reasons to…
  • Annoyances

    19 May 2015 | 5:52 pm
    A week or two ago, Google stopped supporting the authentication protocol used by my commandline tool for posting posts to my blog. I downloaded a new set of commandline tools for posting to blogger and integrated it into my script. Turns out the new tools used OATH, which Google coincidentally phased out in favor of OATH2 a few days later. :-( I still need to find the right tools. The problem is that (a) I prefer editing my posts from the commandline with vim than typing them into Blogger's web interface, and (b) I had a lot of simplified TeX-like math processing in my posting script as well…
  • Why so few kinds for so many particles?

    19 May 2015 | 5:31 pm
    There are something like 1080 individual particles and only something like 102 kinds of particles. It seems an incredible coincidence; so many particles, all drawn from so few kinds, even though surely the space of metaphysical possibility contains infinitely many kinds. It's like a country all of whose citizens have names that start with A, B or M.But perhaps one could explain this by the massively multilocated particle hypothesis (MMPH), namely that to each kind there corresponds only one individual, but highly multilocated, particle (Feynman proposed something like this)? It isn't…
  • Lifelikeness of fractals

    19 May 2015 | 10:32 am
    Fractal-type objects can be quite lifelike and easy to generate. I've been scripting Minecraft with Python, in preparation for teaching this to gifted middle- and high-schoolers this summer, and wrote a simple 3D turtle graphics class with pitch/yaw/roll support. Like many kids of my generation, I did 2D turtle graphics programming with LOGO in school, but a 3D turtle just has a load of new possibilities. Instructions on how to do this stuff are in my Python coding for Minecraft instructable. It was very easy to generate this rather lifelike tree with a simple bit of recursive code. There is…
  • You're not killed by the fusion of the Grim Reapers

    18 May 2015 | 7:54 pm
    A grim reaper (GR) is a device that activates at a pre-set time. It checks if Fred--the victim--is alive. If he is, it kills him. If he isn't alive, it does nothing. For the Grim Reaper Paradox, we're supposed to imagine one GR set for 12:30, another for 12:15, another for 12:07.5, and so on. Before each time for which a GR is set, there is an earlier one. But Fred is alive alive at 12:00. Paradox ensues when we notice that Fred must be dead at 12:30 (else that 12:30 GR would have killed him), but no GR could have killed him, since if he were alive at its activation time, he would have been…
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    The Splintered Mind

  • Leading SF Novels: Academic Library Holdings and Citation Rates

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    21 May 2015 | 2:25 pm
    Among the most culturally influential English-language fiction writers of the 20th century, a substantial portion wrote science fiction or fantasy -- "speculative fiction" (SF) broadly construed. H.G. Wells, J.R.R. Tolkien, George Orwell, Isaac Asimov, Philip K. Dick, and Ursula K. Le Guin, for starters. In the 21st century so far, speculative fiction remains culturally important. There's sometimes a feeling among speculative fiction writers that even the best recent work in the genre isn't taken seriously by academic scholars. I thought I'd look at a couple possible (imperfect!) measures of…
  • Moral Duties to Flawed Gods

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    14 May 2015 | 1:36 pm
    Suppose that God exists and is morally imperfect. (I'm inclined to think that if a god exists, that god is not perfect.) If God has created me and sustains the world, I owe a pretty big debt to her/him/it. Now suppose that this morally imperfect God tells me to wear a blue shirt today instead of a brown one. No greater good would be served; it's just God's preference, for no particular reason. God tells me to do it, but doesn't threaten me with punishment if I don't -- she (let's say "she") just appeals to my sense of moral obligation: "I am your creator," she says, "and I work to sustain…
  • Network Map of Philosophical SF Authors

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    11 May 2015 | 2:49 pm
    Andrew Higgins has done one of his beautiful network maps for my Philosophical SF authors list:[click to see full size] Andrew writes: This graph represents a network of science fiction authors and philosophers, with the authors linked to philosophers just in case the philosopher listed that author as philosophically interesting. Authors are labeled, and label size corresponds to the number of philosophers mentioning them. Label colors and positions are rough indicators of similarity. Colors represent groups of authors; as an intuitive gloss, if authors A1-An are the same color that means the…
  • Competing Perspectives on the Significance of One's Final, Dying Thought

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    8 May 2015 | 11:50 am
    Here's a particularly unsentimental view about last, dying thoughts: Your dying thought will be your least important thought. After all (assuming no afterlife), it is the one thought guaranteed to have no influence on any of your future thoughts, or on any other aspect of your psychology. Now maybe if you express the thought aloud -- "I did not get my Spaghetti Os. I got spaghetti. I want the press to know this." -- or if your last thought is otherwise detectable by others, it will have an effect; but for this post let's assume a private last thought that influences no one else. A narrative…
  • List of Philosophical Science Fiction / Speculative Fiction

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    7 May 2015 | 5:56 pm
    I've just updated my list of "philosophically interesting" SF -- about 400 total recommendations from 40 contributors, along with brief "pitches" for each work that point toward the work's philosophical interest. All of the contributors are either professional philosophers or professional SF writers with graduate training in philosophy. The version sorted by author (or director, for movies) is organized so that the most frequently recommended authors appear first on the list. What SF authors are the biggest hits with the philosophy crowd? Now you know! (Or you will know, shortly after you…
 
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    In the Space of Reasons

  • Rereading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance after 32 years

    20 May 2015 | 2:24 pm
    My old friend Derek, who spends his days repairing a couple of aging Moulton bicycles, reminded me by email of a scene in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenancein which the motorcycle maintaining narrator alienates his friend John by offering to repair the latter’s expensive BMW with a beer can shim [Pirsig 2009]. John, we are told, prizes the appearance of things, or ‘romantic quality’ and thus cannot see the ‘classical’ quality that attaches to underlying form, to a properly functioning motorcycle with non-wobbly handlebars.Not being able to recall the point of the scene, I…
  • Campbell on the meaning-rationality link in delusions

    13 May 2015 | 8:06 am
    Aline, Gloria and I met together to discuss John Campbell’s 2001 paper ‘Rationality, meaning and the analysis of delusion’. As a result I think I have a clearer picture of why I disagree with it than before. The following are thus not my own thoughts (though neither do I want to saddle - my expression of - them onto either of my colleagues).Campbell’s paper divides between two phases of argument. In the first, he deploys a Davidsonian link between meaning and rationality to press problems with the interpretation of characteristic expressions of the Capgras delusion. The characteristic…
  • If a lion could talk...

    12 May 2015 | 7:27 am
    I am delighted to see this issue of Existential Comicsdoesn’t assume, as so often by others, that Wittgenstein’s quip about the lion suggests that we would not be able to interpret the lion’s speech.  This line complements the last line in the Tractatus as the quotations all the participants on that fine 1980-90s radio 4 show Stop the Week knew. (And it really was an excellent programme, an excellent use of 30 minutes of the radio. I recall – dimly albeit – a good 15 minute discussion of the worth of fish knives, the vague recollection of which sometimes makes me wonder now…
  • Democracy and Jubilee the elephant

    8 May 2015 | 7:27 am
    For some reason today I am reminded of the first occasion I wondered whether it was conceptually possible that democracy could deliver, not just a result I didn’t like but rather, something that surely no one with a proper view of the facts could think the best.In 1977 a baby elephant was born in Chester Zoo and the BBC children’s television programme Blue Peter was given the task of polling popular opinion for the choice of name. It being 1977, a particular year long royal event was much in the news. As a Cub Scout, I was issued with a huge badge to be worn all that year and there was…
  • Suzanne Stern-Gillet on ‘Is philosophy a set of footnotes to Plato?’

    7 May 2015 | 6:57 am
    I went to an interesting polemical talk by Professor Suzanne Stern-Gillet yesterday called ‘Is philosophy a set of footnotes to Plato?’.The abstract ran as follows.A unique particularity of philosophy as an academic discipline is to include, as an integral part of itself, a reflection on its own past.  This is a ‘fact’ insofar as anyone embarking on the study of philosophy today can expect frequent encounters with Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Kant and countless other figures from the past.  Why should this be so?  And, if it is so, why did a well-known Princeton…
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    Freemason Information

  • THE POWER OF PRAYER

    TimBryce
    18 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    BRYCE ON RELIGION – Does it really work? (Click for AUDIO VERSION) To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request. I have had many friends who have asked for prayers for a loved one, usually someone in sickness and distress, such as someone about to undergo surgery, a failing parent, or a young person fighting an addiction. My Christian and Jewish friends are quick to respond to offer their support, but I do not hear too much from agnostics. On more than one occasion I have heard from the people seeking support adamantly claim, “Prayer works!” I have…
  • THE MEANING OF LIFE

    TimBryce
    24 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    BRYCE ON LIFE – It is ultimately about good versus evil. (Click for AUDIO VERSION) To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request. In the Monty Python movie, “The Meaning of Life,” the troupe offers a tongue-in-cheek explanation; “Well, it’s nothing very special: Try to be nice to people; avoid eating fat; read a good book every now and then; get some walking in; and try to live together in peace and harmony with people of all creeds and nations.” Their explanation was very succinct and made for a humorous ending to the film.
  • The Durhams Of Fairfield

    Fred Milliken
    21 Apr 2015 | 2:48 pm
      Dr., Rev., Bro. Robert L. Uzzel and Bro. Frederic L. Milliken Past Grand Historian of the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Texas, Dr. Rev. Bro. Robert L. Uzzel,  has a new book out, “The Durhams of Fairfield.” This is Uzzel’s Roots story, tracing his wife’s family genealogy. The Durhams, Black and White, originated in Fairfield County, South Carolina. Those that were slaves later moved with their Masters to DeSoto Parish, Louisiana.  From the early 1850s to 1930 DeSoto Parish was the home of Mansfield Female College, the oldest female college west of the Mississippi…
  • The Christianization of Freemasonry

    Greg Stewart
    13 Apr 2015 | 3:57 am
    In this installment of Symbols & Symbolism, we look at a reading from Albert G. Mackey’s Encyclopedia of Freemasonry on the Christening of Freemasonry, a sentiment that Mackey feels “… does not belong to the ancient system” of Freemasonry. You can read more installments of Mackey’s Encyclopedia under Symbols & Symbolism here on this site and video of these segments on YouTube. The interpretation of the symbols of Freemasonry from a Christian point of view is a theory adopted by some of the most distinguished Masonic writers of England and this country,…
  • Happy Patriots Day

    Fred Milliken
    12 Apr 2015 | 2:17 am
        Once again it is time for The Beehive’s annual Patriot’s Day message. Patriots Day is an obscure holiday celebrated in just one county – Middlesex – in Massachusetts. In the early years of our nation it was a National holiday but gradually July 4th supplanted a similar celebration. Patriot’s Day commemorates the first battles of the American Revolution in Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts on April 19, 1775 where the shot was fired heard round the world. Having been born and raised in Lexington, the history of these battles was ingrained in me from an early age and…
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    Philosophy News

  • William Zinsser, who died last week, knew how to live well and write well. His advice about endings: "When you're ready to stop, stop"

    22 May 2015 | 8:04 am
    William Zinsser, who died last week, knew how to live well and write well. His advice about endings: "When you're ready to stop, stop"Continue reading . . . News source: Arts & Letters Daily
  • Mistakes

    22 May 2015 | 5:02 am
    View image | gettyimages.com If you have made a mistake, do not be afraid of admitting the fact and amending your ways. -Confucius   I never make the same mistake twice. Unfortunately, there are an infinite number of mistakes. So, I keep making new ones. Fortunately, philosophy is rather helpful in minimizing the impact of mistakes and learning that crucial aspect of wisdom: not committing the same error over and over. One key aspect to avoiding the repetition of errors is skill in critical thinking. While critical thinking has become something of a buzz-word bloated fad, the core of it…
  • "Objective Menu" Theories of Wellbeing

    22 May 2015 | 3:00 am
    "Objective list" theories of wellbeing are easily misunderstood.  It's often assumed that such theories are committed to the implausible ideas that (i) the same things are good for everyone, regardless of their personal tastes and inclinations, and (ii) a good life must tick off every item on the list, and insofar as it misses one, the life thereby suffers from a significant lack.These misunderstandings might be easily avoided with a little re-framing.  I take the core idea of objective theories of wellbeing to be that some personal projects are (inherently) more worth pursuing than…
  • The Lure of Whitehead

    21 May 2015 | 7:26 pm
    2015.05.21 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Nicholas Gaskill and A. J. Nocek (eds.), The Lure of Whitehead, University of Minnesota Press, 2014, 427pp., $35.00 (pbk), ISBN 9780816679966. Reviewed by Brian G. Henning, Gonzaga University For three-quarters of a century the work of the mathematician and philosopher Alfred North Whitehead (1861-1947) has languished, ignored equally by mainstream Continental and Anglo-American thinkers. The reasons for this are complex, but, to grossly simplify, one might say that Whitehead's was a project born in the wrong season.[1] Of…
  • Time and Freedom

    21 May 2015 | 6:24 pm
    2015.05.20 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Christophe Bouton, Time and Freedom, Christopher McCann (tr.), Northwestern University Press, 2014, 282pp., $34.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780810130159. Reviewed by Hans Pedersen, Indiana University of Pennsylvania In this book Christophe Bouton attempts to explore the connection between human freedom and time. In particular, he is interested in the way different philosophical conceptions of time allow or fail to allow for the existence of alternate possible courses of action. As he states in the Introduction, "I assume that human freedom…
 
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    The Philosophers' Cocoon

  • How do you tackle knee-jerk relativism?

    Mark Hopwood
    20 May 2015 | 5:25 am
    "You should follow the principles that are true for you"; "what's right and wrong is just what your culture tells you is right and wrong"; "no-one else can tell you that your morality isn't the right one". Sound familiar? Anyone who has taught Intro to Ethics (and probably a lot of other intro classes too) has probably heard statements like this on a pretty regular basis. At its worst, the knee-jerk relativism to which many students instinctively revert can seem like it's going to render the entire class pointless.* Why worry about the arguments…
  • The importance of proofreading

    Axel Gelfert
    20 May 2015 | 4:38 am
    "The academic monograph is dead! The days of small university presses are numbered!" This is a common refrain among analysts of academic publishing in the digital age -- sometimes proclaimed with glee (especially by those technology enthusiasts who would like to see websites and digital databases take the place of the academic monograph), but more often in the form of a lament over the decline of publishing. And yet, monographs still play an important role -- not only for individual career paths (especially in disciplines where "having a monograph" is seen as essential for…
  • Barnes and Schliesser on Casual Cruelty in Philosophy

    Marcus Arvan
    18 May 2015 | 8:18 am
    Eric Schleisser has a thought-provoking post over at Digessions & Impressions, 'On Casualty Cruelty in Philosophy' discussing Elizabeth Barnes' moving post at Philosoph-her on what it is like to be a person with a disability in philosophy. Barnes writes: I have sat in philosophy seminars where it was asserted that I should be left to die on a desert island if the choice was between saving me and saving an arbitrary non-disabled person. I have been told it would be wrong for me to have my biological children because of my disability. I have been told that, while it isn’t…
  • So you want to publish a book--Part 1: book proposals

    Marcus Arvan
    17 May 2015 | 7:36 am
    In the comments section of my post on John Turri's (illuminating) self-report data on papers he's published, Sam Duncan asked, "Could you guys ever run a post on publishing a book here?" Sam also asked several questions about book proposals, namely: Just what are the respectable presses in philosophy? (I know huge question and more than a little subjective too). How much of the book should you have written before you even shop the proposal?  How long do presses take to get back to you? Is it acceptable to send out proposals to multiple presses at the same time? Is it a…
  • Higgs vacuum stability and fine-tuning

    Marcus Arvan
    15 May 2015 | 1:38 pm
    Regular readers of this blog know that I think our reality is probably a massive peer-to-peer (P2P) networked computer simulation (also see here and here). Some of you may also recall that whereas for most of my life I self-identified as a religious Agnostic, I now self-identify not as a Believer but rather as a Hoper--someone who believes it is a serious epistemic possibility that some sort of 'God' exists, and who hopes against all hope (but does not believe) that a good God (one that can somehow redeem this rather wonderful but rotten world) exists (also see here). I…
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    iai.tv news RSS feed

  • The Growth Delusion

    Ann Pettifor
    13 May 2015 | 8:15 am
    Every year, the Institute of Art and Ideas organises HowTheLightGetsIn, the world’s largest philosophy and music festival.  This year’s festival happens from the 21st-31st May in Hay, and the theme for 2015 is ‘Fantasy and Reality.’  How much of what we take to be reality is a fantasy of our own making? And which of our current fantasies should become the realities of the future? In this article Ann Pettifor explores whether economic growth can ever be sustainable ahead of her appearance at the festival in The Infinite Boom.   We tend to assume that our wages or salaries should,…
  • The Code of the Cosmos

    Chiara Marletto
    11 May 2015 | 4:40 am
    Every year, the Institute of Art and Ideas organises HowTheLightGetsIn, the world’s largest philosophy and music festival.  This year’s festival happens from the 21st-31st May in Hay, and the theme for 2015 is ‘Fantasy and Reality.’  How much of what we take to be reality is a fantasy of our own making? And which of our current fantasies should become the realities of the future?  In this article Chiara Marletto explores whether we should consider information, rather than matter as the fundamental building block of the universe ahead of her appearance at the festival in The…
  • Does God Exist?

    Stephen Law
    11 May 2015 | 4:07 am
    Every year, the Institute of Art and Ideas organises HowTheLightGetsIn, the world’s largest philosophy and music festival.  This year’s festival happens from the 21st-31st May in Hay, and the theme for 2015 is ‘Fantasy and Reality.’  How much of what we take to be reality is a fantasy of our own making? And which of our current fantasies should become the realities of the future?  In this piece Stephen Law explores the problem of evil ahead of his talk at the festival in The Evil God Challenge.   Welcome to Eth, a small planet circling a medium sized star on the far side of this…
  • Get Real

    Eliane Glaser
    7 May 2015 | 6:31 am
    Every year, the Institute of Art and Ideas organises HowTheLightGetsIn the world’s largest philosophy and music festival.  This year’s festival happens from the 21st-31st May in Hay and the theme for 2015 is ‘Fantasy and Reality.’  How much of what we take to be reality is a fantasy of our own making? And which of our current fantasies should become the realities of the future?  In this article Eliane Glaser argues that we all need to get real ahead of her appearance at the festival in Being Free and Making Choices.   It’s a sunny Sunday morning and I’m popping out to the…
  • The Reality Instinct

    Berit Brogaard
    7 May 2015 | 5:26 am
    Every year, the Institute of Art and Ideas organises HowTheLightGetsIn the world’s largest philosophy and music festival.  This year’s festival happens from the 21st-31st May in Hay, and the theme for 2015 is ‘Fantasy and Reality.’  How much of what we take to be reality is a fantasy of our own making? And which of our current fantasies should become the realities of the future?  In this article Berit Brogaard explores whether we should rely on our feelings more than our reason ahead of her appearance at the festival in The Reality of Feeling.   “Intuition comes very close to…
 
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    Your Motivation Guru

  • Top 10 Inspirational Quotes for Fresh Grads and Students

    YourMotivationGuru
    20 May 2015 | 1:34 am
    Top 10 Inspirational Quotes for Fresh Grads and Students “Success consists of going from failure to failure without loss of enthusiasm.” –Winston Churchill “If you hear a voice within you say ‘you cannot paint,’ then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced.” –Vincent Van Gogh “Don’t go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first.” –Mark Twain   “When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.”…
  • Top Five Life Lessons from Deepak Chopra

    YourMotivationGuru
    7 May 2015 | 10:01 pm
    Top Five Life Lessons from Deepak Chopra Lesson No.1# Faith makes everything possible. Lesson No.2# Meditation doesn’t have to be difficult. Lesson No.3# Science alone cannot solve the mystery of existence. Lesson No.4# Love is unconditional approval and acceptance. Lesson No.5# Loving your family and children is not enough. The post Top Five Life Lessons from Deepak Chopra appeared first on Your Motivation Guru.
  • 10 Job Search Tips for Job Seekers

    YourMotivationGuru
    6 May 2015 | 12:18 am
    10 Job Search Tips for Job Seekers Looking for a new job? Networking, exploring, and applying to several employers are your primary targets. However if your job search is off to a slow start then use our time-saving job search tips that will assist you in your job hunt. Gear up, be prepared. You must always have an up-to-date resume ready to fire – even if you are not presently looking for a new job. You never know when a good opening might come up. Build a LinkedIn Profile and start building connections in your field of work. Get on Social media. These days social networking sites like…
  • The Dalai Lama’s 18 Rules for Living

    YourMotivationGuru
    4 Apr 2015 | 2:35 am
    The Dalai Lama’s 18 Rules for Living   At the turn of this century, the Dalai Lama issued the following eighteen rules for living. These simple words of counsel cannot be comprehended and be disagreed with; they come from the heart, hence they touch the heart of anyone who reads them.  Here is some huge guidance from the Dalai Lama. Start applying one of these rules on daily basis you yourself will distinguish how much progress you’ve made gradually.   1. Take into account that great love and great achievements involve great risk.   2. When you lose, don’t lose the lesson.  …
  • 30 Most Common Interview Questions and Answers

    YourMotivationGuru
    28 Mar 2015 | 11:57 am
    30 Most Common Interview Questions and Answers   Employers conducting interviews generally have a list of about 20 to 30 frequently asked questions. They tend to ask all interviewees an arbitrary mixture of around 10 questions. Before we begin, keep in mind that, in a HR interview, there is no perfectly correct or incorrect response. All you need is a correct way of responding. Tell me about yourself. This is the first and foremost question for any HR interview. The answer to this question sets the tone for the rest of the interview. The ideal way to answer this is to give a brief of your…
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    A Brighter Everyday

  • 31 Leadership Quotes that Make You a Sought-After Leader

    Enock Machodi
    19 May 2015 | 5:55 pm
    As I take my first stride to write this post, you need you to understand that leadership is all about the relationship and social influence you have among people, as well as steps you take towards guiding, managing or solving problems; hence, leaving everyone inspired and empowered.     Leadership is influence. – John C.… Read More The post 31 Leadership Quotes that Make You a Sought-After Leader appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • 3 Things You Need To Do To Overcome The Odds Of Finding A Passion That Works In Your Favor

    Enock Machodi
    13 May 2015 | 2:51 pm
    Finding your passion is something that could bring you happiness. But to understand what your passion is, there are rules you need to know. I wrote about this in a previous post “Is this the unsexy three-rule clue to understanding your passion?” to help you understand the rules to finding your passion and how finding… Read More The post 3 Things You Need To Do To Overcome The Odds Of Finding A Passion That Works In Your Favor appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • Killing Impossibility with Effort

    Enock Machodi
    28 Apr 2015 | 11:37 am
    Everything at this moment sucks! And nothing is worth trying… That’s the impression I get from the frown on your face, simply because nothing seems to be working in your favor. Right? It seems like you’ve been living in a world of impossibilities and… …with every ticking second, you get the assumption that your dreams… Read More The post Killing Impossibility with Effort appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • The Best Ideas in 2015 won’t always come from you

    Enock Machodi
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:32 pm
    …Ideas. Yes. So elusive in a way that is untold, but at one point they cross our minds and, Each one of us wants to come up with one or two. Elusive in a way we tend to give them up or even forget about the last idea that came up on our minds. It… Read More The post The Best Ideas in 2015 won’t always come from you appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • Is this the Unsexy Three-Rule Clue to Understanding Your Passion?

    Enock Machodi
    10 Apr 2015 | 3:05 pm
    What do you know about passion? In my view, passion is an emotion that portrays realism, and is kinda powerful too. The truth is your believe about finding passion could be wrong. As a general rule of the thumb, you need to know that all emotions exist for good reasons. For example, you feel thirsty… Read More The post Is this the Unsexy Three-Rule Clue to Understanding Your Passion? appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
 
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    Papercuts

  • Creepy Saudi Bedtime Stories that will Keep you Awake at Night

    kaytus89
    13 May 2015 | 5:02 am
    These are some traditional Safwani bedtime stories. And yes, they are children stories. Sfouf- a tale of jealousy and cannibalism There was once a bright young boy called Sfouf. His mother had passed away and so he now lived with his father and jealous stepmother who hated him very much. One day, Sfouf’s father asked his wife to start preparing for for a grand dinner party for some guests that were coming over. The jealous stepmother took this opportunity to get rid of Sfouf once and for all. The next day she picked up Sfouf from school with the excuse that his father wanted him. This…
  • Is Feminism the new Patriarchy? 6 reasons why you shouldn’t be a feminist

    kaytus89
    3 May 2015 | 7:37 am
    Intellectual equality, equal pay and female rights are aspects of feminist movements that no one would disagree with. However, certain feminist groups have taken their role too far and are in many ways doing more harm than good. Here are some reasons why you should think twice before buying into certain aspects of feminist ideology: 1-  It undermines traditional female roles. Certain prominent female figures have been known to attack traditional female roles.  Not too long ago, a feminist blogger called Amy Glass sparked outrage due to a post titled: ‘’I Look Down On Young Women…
  • 10 life lessons you can learn from horror movies

    kaytus89
    27 Apr 2015 | 7:04 am
    1- If you hear a strange noise, never investigate it. Seriously why ask a question you don’t want the answer to? 2- An unlocked house or building is NOT an invitation to walk in. 3- Mirrors can reveal more than you expect…get rid of them, especially the ones in the toilet. 4- The next time you witness a murder, just drive in the opposite direction… 5- If you run over a man, it might be a good idea to just tell the police…that, or risk being stalked and murdered by a vengeful psychopath. 6- Appreciate your life and loved ones. Or this old man will make you pay. 7- If…
  • ‘Stop loving your country!’ Six reasons why nationalism is ruining the world

    kaytus89
    21 Apr 2015 | 6:33 am
    Loving your country and having a strong national identity are basic sentiments that are commonly found around the world. But what many individuals may not be aware of, is that these attitudes are in fact far from innocent and can even become dangerous. And here are some reasons why: 1- It creates an ‘us’ vs ‘them’ mentality. With the birth of the nation, new borders were created. Although national identity is useful in uniting citizens from different backgrounds under one common banner, it also excludes those on the other side of the border.  2- It’s a tool for mass manipulation…
  • Hilarious Saudi Expressions you Should Know

    kaytus89
    19 Apr 2015 | 5:32 am
    Every culture has its quirks and strange sayings, and in Saudi, these are taken to another level. I’ve listed some hilarious expressions that are commonly used in my hometown Safwa in the Eastern Province. Of course, some of these sayings may not be exclusive to Safwa or even Saudi, but I’ve included them nonetheless to give a general taste of the region’s popular culture. I will stomp your liver  -بادوس في جبدك This is a violent and effective threat that is commonly used in everyday speech when you’re really frustrated with someone.  This liver motif is…
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