Philosophy

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  • Job Market Boot Camp, Part 8: The Cover Letter

    The Philosophers' Cocoon
    Marcus Arvan
    2 May 2015 | 9:02 am
    Now that we have examined building and composing CVs, obtaining recommendation letters, the European job market, job-market consultants, and developing a coherent research program, I would like to move onto the rest of the standard job-market dossier materials, beginning with cover letters. Some readers might wonder why I'm going over dossier materials so early, given that it's only May and the main US job market doesn't heat up for several months for now. The answer is two-fold. First, foreign job markets are currently in full-swing. It seems like I'm receiving foreign…
  • The Sound of Bedrock: Lines of Grammar between Kant, Wittgenstein, and Cavell

    European Journal of Philosophy
    Avner Baz
    23 Jan 2015 | 9:51 pm
    Abstract In ‘Aesthetics Problems of Modern Philosophy’ Stanley Cavell proposes, first, that Kant's characterization of judgments of beauty may be read as a Wittgensteinian grammatical characterization, and, second, that the philosophical appeal to ‘what we say and mean’ partakes of the grammar of judgment of beauty. I argue first that the expression of the dawning of an aspect partakes of the grammar of judgments of beauty as characterized by Kant, and may also be seen—on a prevailing way of thinking about concepts and how they relate to their instances—to have the same kind of…
  • Narrative and the Stability of Intention

    European Journal of Philosophy
    Edward S. Hinchman
    14 Sep 2014 | 5:22 pm
    Abstract This paper addresses a problem concerning the rational stability of intention. When you form an intention to φ at some future time t, you thereby make it subjectively rational for you to follow through and φ at t, even if—hypothetically—you would abandon the intention were you to redeliberate at t. It is hard to understand how this is possible. Shouldn't the perspective of your acting self be what determines what is then subjectively rational for you? I aim to solve this problem by highlighting a role for narrative in intention. I'll argue that committing yourself to a course…
  • The Identity Theory of Truth

    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
    Richard Gaskin
    1 May 2015 | 4:26 pm
    [Revised entry by Richard Gaskin on May 1, 2015. Changes to: 0] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by Richard Gaskin replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous authors.] The identity theory of truth was influential in the formative years of modern analytic philosophy, and has come to prominence again...
  • ‘Stop loving your country!’ Six reasons why nationalism is ruining the world

    Papercuts
    kaytus89
    21 Apr 2015 | 6:33 am
    Loving your country and having a strong national identity are basic sentiments that are commonly found around the world. But what many individuals may not be aware of, is that these attitudes are in fact far from innocent and can even become dangerous. And here are some reasons why: 1- It creates an ‘us’ vs ‘them’ mentality. With the birth of the nation, new borders were created. Although national identity is useful in uniting citizens from different backgrounds under one common banner, it also excludes those on the other side of the border.  2- It’s a tool for mass manipulation…
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    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

  • The Identity Theory of Truth

    Richard Gaskin
    1 May 2015 | 4:26 pm
    [Revised entry by Richard Gaskin on May 1, 2015. Changes to: 0] [Editor's Note: The following new entry by Richard Gaskin replaces the former entry on this topic by the previous authors.] The identity theory of truth was influential in the formative years of modern analytic philosophy, and has come to prominence again...
  • Aristotle's Logic

    Robin Smith
    29 Apr 2015 | 10:26 pm
    [Revised entry by Robin Smith on April 29, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Aristotle's logic, especially his theory of the syllogism, has had an unparalleled influence on the history of Western thought. It did not always hold this position: in the Hellenistic period, Stoic logic, and in particular the work of Chrysippus, took pride of place. However, in later antiquity, following the work of Aristotelian Commentators, Aristotle's logic became dominant, and Aristotelian logic was what was transmitted to the Arabic and the Latin medieval traditions, while the...
  • Science and Chinese Philosophy

    Lisa Raphals
    28 Apr 2015 | 10:55 pm
    [New Entry by Lisa Raphals on April 28, 2015.] At first glance, there may appear to be little connection between Chinese philosophy and science. Stereotypes of Chinese philosophy as consisting almost entirely of Confucianism and claims that Confucians were not interested in science add to this perception. For example, in a recent correspondence in the journal...
  • Chinese Philosophy and Chinese Medicine

    Lisa Raphals
    28 Apr 2015 | 10:44 pm
    [New Entry by Lisa Raphals on April 28, 2015.] According to Zhang Xichun 張錫純 (1860 - 1933), one of the leading reformers of Chinese medicine in the early twentieth century: Many recent medical journal reports take the view that [traditional Chinese] philosophy holds back the progress of medicine, but their...
  • Social Epistemology

    Alvin Goldman and Thomas Blanchard
    28 Apr 2015 | 10:26 pm
    [Revised entry by Alvin Goldman and Thomas Blanchard on April 28, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Until recently, epistemology - the study of knowledge and justified belief - was heavily individualistic in focus. The emphasis was on evaluating doxastic attitudes (beliefs and disbeliefs) of individuals in abstraction from their social environment. The result is a distorted picture of the human epistemic situation, which is largely shaped by social relationships and institutions. Social epistemology seeks to redress this imbalance by investigating the epistemic effects of…
 
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    Talking Philosophy

  • Protests & Violence

    Mike LaBossiere
    29 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com On April 12, 2015 Freddie Gray died in police custody. From the viewpoint of some Americans, this was the continuation of a pattern police causing the deaths of young black men. From the viewpoint of some other Americans, this was just another isolated incident. The initial protests to this death were peaceful and it was hoped by many that Baltimore would avoid the violence that has marked other protests (including riots in Baltimore’s own past). This hope was shattered in an outbreak of violence and destruction. One obvious concern is the identity and the…
  • Information Immortality

    Mike LaBossiere
    27 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    Most people are familiar with the notion that energy cannot be destroyed. Interestingly, there is also a rule in quantum mechanics that forbids the destruction of information. This principle, called unitarity, is often illustrated by the example of burning a book: though the book is burned, the information still remain— View image | gettyimages.com although it would obviously be much harder to “read” a burned book. This principle has, in recent years, run into some trouble with black holes and they might or might not be able to destroy information. My interest here is not with this…
  • Who is Responsible for a Living Wage?

    Mike LaBossiere
    24 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com There is, obviously enough, a minimum amount of income that a person or family needs in order to survive—that is, to pay for necessities such as food, shelter, clothing and health care. In order to address this need, the United States created a minimum wage. However, this wage has not kept up with the cost of living and many Americans simply do not earn enough to support themselves. These people are known, appropriately enough, as the working poor. This situation raises an obvious moral and practical question: who should bear the cost of making up the difference…
  • Are Animals People?

    Mike LaBossiere
    22 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    While the ethical status of animals has been debated since at least the time of Pythagoras, the serious debate over whether or not animals are people has just recently begun to heat up. While it is easy to dismiss the claim that animals are people, it is actually a matter worth considering. There are at least three type of personhood: legal personhood, metaphysical personhood and moral personhood. Legal personhood is the easiest of the three. While it would seem reasonable to expect some sort of rational foundation for claims of legal personhood, it is really just a matter of how the relevant…
  • Doing Crimes in Future Times…with Drones

    Mike LaBossiere
    20 Apr 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com According to my always ignored iron rule of technology, any technology that can be misused will be misused. Drones are, obviously enough, no exception. While law-abiding citizens and law writing corporations have been finding various legal uses for drones, other enterprising folks have been finding other uses. These include such things as deploying drones to peep on people and using them to transport drugs. The future will, of course, see the employment of drones and other robots by criminals (and not just governments engaging in immoral deeds). The two mains…
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    AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

  • Question about Language - Douglas Burnham responds

    3 May 2015 | 3:45 am
    Can a word be used incorrectly and still be 'useful'? I've heard that pragmatists define true statements as those that are useful in predicting future empirical outcomes, to quote Wikipedia. However, I have heard of words being used incorrectly that can still be 'useful' despite being incorrect. The words 'subjective' and 'objective' are often used in everyday language to divide and distingiush things that are 'a matter of opinion' from things that are 'a matter of fact', respectively. Although this is an oversimplified and incorrect use of the words, you can't deny that people still find…
  • Question about Love - Allen Stairs responds

    30 Apr 2015 | 6:06 pm
    Is it ideal for a person to be in romantic love with someone that that person doesn't find physically attractive? Beauty in my opinion is both skin deep and skin shallow--if beauty is only skin deep and impossible to ascertain without having a conversation, then that seemingly makes most of aesthetics pointless. Skin deep beauty seems to be a misnomer because it doesn't really refer to beauty at all but one's personality. Romantic love is unlike other forms of love in that there is usually a great deal of choice in selecting a partner not to mention the sexual component, so if given a choice…
  • Question about Time - Stephen Maitzen responds

    30 Apr 2015 | 5:04 pm
    Is time traveling to the past a logical contradiction? I mean because if I were to go into a time machine tomorrow then the "past" I travel to would actually be the future relative to today. Response from: Stephen Maitzen Defenders of the possibility of time-travel usually address this potential contradiction by distinguishing between your personal time (the time kept by your biological clock) and external time (the time kept by the world's calendars). Your departure on a time-travel voyage can be future in your personal time (as well as in external time) even though your destination is past…
  • Question about Philosophers - Nickolas Pappas responds

    30 Apr 2015 | 2:10 pm
    What would Plato say about terrorism, specifically Al Qadea? What would he say about the role of religion in terrorism, as well. Thank you Response from: Nickolas Pappas As far as the use of force goes, I would be surprised if Plato would have had much to say about what we call terrorism. This is not because he would approve of the tactic of singling out civilians as targets, in the hopes of demoralizing an enemy; but simply because he would take a lot of such tactics for granted. The histories of the time indicate two distinct forms of engagement between enemies. On the one hand, a lot of…
  • Question about Value - Stephen Maitzen responds

    26 Apr 2015 | 5:49 am
    It seems that in order to claim anything is intrinsically wrong, one must assert that some specific thing, be it happiness, duty, eudaimonia or something else, has intrinsic value. I cannot see, however, what logical process can lead one to this conclusion from a materialist perspective. If all that exists is matter, then what kind of property would 'value' be? If happiness, for example, is simply a mental state, no different from sadness or pain, then how can it have the property of 'value', and what kind of property might this be? Response from: Stephen Maitzen If all that exists is matter,…
 
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    Ethics Etc

  • Earth Week Podcast: Cat Eyes for Climate Change

    S. Matthew Liao
    20 Apr 2015 | 10:35 pm
    In celebration of Earth Week, readers of Ethics Etc might be interested in a podcast I did with The Adaptors called “Cat Eyes for Climate Change.” You can find the podcast here: http://www.theadaptors.org/episodes/2015/2/11/cat-eyes-for-climate-cha nge and on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cat-eyes-for-climate-change/id9608 40471?i=335303274&mt=2 You can also listen to it directly here:
  • NYU Workshop on Current Controversies in Bioethics

    S. Matthew Liao
    15 Apr 2015 | 8:08 pm
    Date: Friday, May 22nd-Saturday, May 23, 2015 Location: Jurow Hall, NYU Silver Center, 100 Washington Square East Time: TBA Bioethics is the study of ethical issues arising out of advances in the life sciences and medicine. The NYU Center for Bioethics is hosting a workshop with thirteen significant figures in Bioethics who will pair up […]
  • CUNY Philosophy Graduate Student Conference 2015

    S. Matthew Liao
    30 Mar 2015 | 9:57 pm
    “Normativity and the Human Sciences” April 24th and 25th, 2015 The 18th Annual CUNY Graduate Student Philosophy Conference Department of Philosophy, The Graduate Center, CUNY (New York, NY) Keynote Speakers: Tyler Burge (UCLA) and S. Matthew Liao (NYU) Schedule of Events: Friday, April 24th (room 7113, excluding the Keynote presentation) 11:30 AM – Welcome 11:45 […]
  • Indeterminacy in Ethics at Reading

    S. Matthew Liao
    26 Mar 2015 | 9:15 pm
    25 April, University of Reading Registration is now open for the 2015 Ratio one-day conference at the University of Reading: Indeterminacy in Ethics (programme below). You can register at the conference website http://ratioconference.wordpress.com or by emailing Luke Elson (luke.elson (at) reading.ac.uk) if you’d prefer to pay in person: £20 staff; £10 graduate students; £5 undergraduate […]
  • CFP: Race and Aesthetics

    S. Matthew Liao
    16 Feb 2015 | 8:32 pm
    New submission deadline and format A British Society of Aesthetics Connections Conference Conference website: raceandaesthetics.weebly.com May 19th and 20th, 2015 Leeds, UK CONFIRMED SPEAKERS Alia Al-Saji (McGill University) Nathaniel Adam Tobias Coleman (University College London) Kristie Dotson (Michigan State University) A.W. Eaton (University of Illinois – Chicago) Sherri Irvin (University of Oklahoma) Ron Mallon (Washington […]
 
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    European Journal of Philosophy

  • On Nietzschean Constitutivism

    Peter Poellner
    13 Apr 2015 | 7:28 pm
  • Mark Sacks Lecture 2013: Spinoza on Goodness and Beauty and the Prophet and the Artist

    Moira Gatens
    13 Apr 2015 | 7:28 pm
    Abstract Some critics have claimed that Spinoza's philosophy has nothing to offer aesthetics. I argue that within his conception of an ars vivendi one can discern a nascent theory of art (ars). I bring the figure of the prophet in relation to that of the artist and, alongside a consideration of Spinoza's views on goodness and beauty, show that the special talent of the artist should be understood in terms of the entirely natural expression of the conatus.
  • The Sound of Bedrock: Lines of Grammar between Kant, Wittgenstein, and Cavell

    Avner Baz
    23 Jan 2015 | 9:51 pm
    Abstract In ‘Aesthetics Problems of Modern Philosophy’ Stanley Cavell proposes, first, that Kant's characterization of judgments of beauty may be read as a Wittgensteinian grammatical characterization, and, second, that the philosophical appeal to ‘what we say and mean’ partakes of the grammar of judgment of beauty. I argue first that the expression of the dawning of an aspect partakes of the grammar of judgments of beauty as characterized by Kant, and may also be seen—on a prevailing way of thinking about concepts and how they relate to their instances—to have the same kind of…
  • Narrative and the Stability of Intention

    Edward S. Hinchman
    14 Sep 2014 | 5:22 pm
    Abstract This paper addresses a problem concerning the rational stability of intention. When you form an intention to φ at some future time t, you thereby make it subjectively rational for you to follow through and φ at t, even if—hypothetically—you would abandon the intention were you to redeliberate at t. It is hard to understand how this is possible. Shouldn't the perspective of your acting self be what determines what is then subjectively rational for you? I aim to solve this problem by highlighting a role for narrative in intention. I'll argue that committing yourself to a course…
  • The Limits of Learning: Habermas' Social Theory and Religion

    Maeve Cooke
    28 Jul 2014 | 10:17 pm
    Abstract Habermas' view that contemporary philosophy and social theory can learn from religious traditions calls for closer consideration. He is correct to hold that religious traditions constitute a reservoir of potentially important meanings that can be critically appropriated without emptying them of their motivating and inspirational power. However, contrary to what he implies, his theory allows for learning from religion only to a very limited degree. This is due to two core elements of his conceptual framework, both of which are key features of his account of postmetaphysical thinking.
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    Mind - current issue

  • Living Together as Equals: The Demands of Citizenship, by Andrew Mason

    Berkey, B.
    8 Apr 2015 | 11:47 pm
  • Time-Slice Rationality

    Hedden, B.
    8 Apr 2015 | 11:47 pm
    I advocate Time-Slice Rationality, the thesis that the relationship between two time-slices of the same person is not importantly different, for purposes of rational evaluation, from the relationship between time-slices of distinct persons. The locus of rationality, so to speak, is the time-slice rather than the temporally extended agent. This claim is motivated by consideration of puzzle cases for personal identity over time and by a very moderate form of internalism about rationality. Time-Slice Rationality conflicts with two proposed principles of rationality, Conditionalization and…
  • Objectivity and the Parochial, by Charles Travis

    French, C.
    8 Apr 2015 | 11:47 pm
  • What Pain Asymbolia Really Shows

    Klein, C.
    8 Apr 2015 | 11:47 pm
    Pain asymbolics feel pain, but act as if they are indifferent to it. Nikola Grahek argues that such patients present a clear counterexample to motivationalism about pain. I argue that Grahek has mischaracterized pain asymbolia. Properly understood, asymbolics have lost a general capacity to care about their bodily integrity. Asymbolics’ indifference to pain thus does not show something about the intrinsic nature of pain; it shows something about the relationship between pains and subjects, and how that relationship might break down. I explore the consequences of such a view for both…
  • The Riddle of Hume's Treatise: Skepticism, Naturalism, and Irreligion, by Paul Russell

    Meeker, K.
    8 Apr 2015 | 11:47 pm
 
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    Feminist Philosophers

  • Inclusive fees campaign

    jennysaul
    2 May 2015 | 2:15 am
    The inclusive fees campaign now has a site where you can pledge your support. Join this campaign and pledge to do one or more of the following: 1. pledge to provide a reduced or waived fees category for contingent faculty and other underemployed academics in any conference you organize 2. lobby the academic organizations you are a member of to provide such reduced fees 3. if you are in a privileged position within academia, you can also follow one or more of these practices: a.if you are asked to be a reviewer at a conference, ask organizers if they are considering a special registration…
  • Simple things more privileged academics can do

    jennysaul
    1 May 2015 | 5:20 am
    Today I posted this on FB: A thing I just did, which I commend to others who are in a fortunate position like me: I am speaking at a small conference. Because of this, I would not normally pay for conference fee or workshop dinner. But I can afford to do so, unlike so many students, un- and under-employed people. So I have paid the fee and the dinner price and asked the organisers to use the money as a small fund for those who need help. If lots of us start doing this, we could really do a bit of good in our field. A nice discussion has ensued of other things that more privileged members of…
  • SWIP UK Mentoring Workshop: Register now!

    jennysaul
    30 Apr 2015 | 2:25 pm
    Women in Philosophy: A Mentoring and Networking Workshop 22nd–23rd June 2015 Humanities Research Centre University of York Registration is now open for the SWIP-associated mentoring and networking workshop for graduate and early career women in philosophy. We invite women to register for the workshop by Monday 1st June (all those who self-identify as women are women). We aim to be as inclusive as possible: women in need of any disability accommodation should not hesitate to get in touch. The workshop venue is fully wheelchair accessible. Registration Fee (including coffees, lunches, and…
  • Judge who said 14 year old victim was partly responsible for her own rape to be given an award

    noetika
    30 Apr 2015 | 12:48 pm
    Next month, less than a year after he was censured by the Montana Supreme Court for comments he made while sentencing a man who raped a 14-year-old girl, retired District Judge G. Todd Baugh will receive a lifetime achievement award from the Yellowstone Area Bar Association. Marian Bradley, president of the Montana chapter of the National Organization for Women, said there is “something absolutely wrong” with members of the local bar giving Baugh the award, according to a report in Last Best News. “Do they not have respect for the women and children of this community?” she said.
  • An argument for fully anonymous peer review by demonstration

    noetika
    29 Apr 2015 | 5:18 pm
    Fiona Ingleby and Megan Head (post-docs in evolutionary genetics and evolutionary biology) co-wrote an article on gender differences in the transition from PhD studies to post-doc. One reviewer suggested (among other things) that a male co-author’s name on the manuscript would be an improvement. Shocking reviewer comments received for our MS on gender differences in PhD-postdoc transition based on survey results with @megabugface 1/4 — Fiona Ingleby (@FionaIngleby) April 29, 2015 Reviewer’s conclusion: we should get a man’s name on MS to improve it (male colleagues had already…
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    Gender, Race and Philosophy: The Blog

  • Race and Racism CFA/CFP

    Sally
    24 Apr 2015 | 6:09 am
    CALL FOR ABSTRACTS/PAPERS Workshop: Race and Racism November 13-15, 2015 Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa Recent philosophical contributions to critical race theory have been exciting, some of the better and more important philosophical work of the past twenty years. This workshop aims to further this dialogue, in a conversation between scholars from South Africa and scholars from elsewhere. Possible questions for discussion: What are races? Are they biological populations or lineages, social creations, or cultures? Non-racialist discourse is prominent among intellectuals in South…
  • TWO PIKSIs!

    Sally
    16 Feb 2015 | 8:14 am
    Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/APA Sponsored Philosophy in an Inclusive Key Summer Institutes (PIKSI) 2015 SUMMER  INSTITUTES FOR  UNDERGRADUATES Application Deadline:  March 13, 2015  Online application form here. PIKSI summer institutes are designed to encourage undergraduates from underrepresented groups to consider future study of philosophy. Undergraduates and recent graduates from underrepresented groups such as women, African Americans, Chicano/as and Latino/as, Native Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, LGBTs, economically disadvantaged communities, and people with…
  • Brown University Summer Immersion Program

    Sally
    16 Feb 2015 | 7:47 am
    The Brown Philosophy Department is pleased to announce a call for applications for the Summer Immersion Program in Philosophy at Brown University. SIPP@Brown is a two-week residential program for members of traditionally underrepresented groups in philosophy, including women and students of color. This year's program will run from May 31, 2015 to June 13, 2015 and will feature seminars taught by Brown faculty and the SIPP@Brown research conference. Students will have travel and lodging expenses covered and will receive a $500 stipend. More information is available…
  • WiPhi lectures on race

    Sally
    12 Dec 2014 | 7:37 am
    CFP: Philosophy of Race and WiPhi   Wireless Philosophy (WiPhi) is an online project that introduces people to the practice of philosophy by making videos that are freely available in a form that is entertaining, interesting, and accessible to people with no background in the subject. This Spring WiPhi hopes to release a series of about 8-10 videos on topics in Philosophy of Race. For this series, we are looking for introductory-level videos like "Introduction to Philosophy of Race," "What is Race?" and "Race and Identity." We hope to bring our audience into…
  • Call for Papers: Perspectives on Gender

    Sally
    14 May 2014 | 12:53 pm
    Perspectives on Gender October 24th-25th, 2014University of California, Irvinewww.perspectivesongender.comIn light of recent national attention given to the status of women in thefield of philosophy, this conference aims to promote open andmulti-disciplinary discussion of issues related to gender. We plan toexchange views on a variety of topics organized under our conferencethemes of gender and knowledge, gender and social justice, gender andscience, and gender and discrimination.  Central goals of the conferenceare to encourage discussion in the face of disagreement and a commitmentto…
 
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    In Socrates' Wake

  • CFP: Children, Food, and Philosophy

    Michael Cholbi
    28 Apr 2015 | 11:31 am
    CALL FOR PAPERSThe American Philosophical Association Committee for Pre-College Instruction in Philosophy (CPIP) is sponsoring a session on Children, Food, and Philosophy to be held at the APA Eastern Division Meeting January 6-9, 2016 in Washington, D.C. The CPIP invites presentation proposals about the intersection between children and food. This may include any of the following topics: ethics and food, food justice from farm to table, food activism, the aesthetics of food, local food, the global food system, or food and health.Send title of presentation, abstract (500 words), and…
  • Handfield: Reflections on the Flipped Classroom

    Michael Cholbi
    28 Apr 2015 | 11:27 am
    A guest post from Toby Handfield, Monash University:There is much buzz around my university at the moment about the promise of the flipped classroom. The idea is that the lecture is not an effective method of delivering content, relative to the alternatives we now have. We can deliver content better via videos, Khan academy style, and we can then use our class time for more interactive work with students. Give them questions, have them complete assignments in class, work with them one on one, or get them into small group discussions. So content delivery becomes homework; homework…
  • Announcing new Wilson Prize for essay on philosophy teaching

    Michael Cholbi
    17 Apr 2015 | 12:00 pm
    REMINDER: The submission deadline is October 1, 2015.Teaching Philosophy is pleased to announce a new essay prize, the Arnold Wilson Prize. Details here and below the fold. Teaching Philosophy is pleased to announced the establishment of the Arnold Wilson Prize. The prize will be awarded within one year of a topic being announced for the best essay concerning an issue related to the significance, goals, or nature of philosophy teaching. The winning essay will receive a $1,000 prize, along with publication in Teaching Philosophy. Entries besides the essay selected for the…
  • Subscribing to Teaching Philosophy

    Michael Cholbi
    17 Apr 2015 | 10:29 am
    I've been posting information about the contents of Teaching Philosophy for a while, but you may not know how to subscribe. The basic information is here, but a rundown:Members of the American Association of Philosophy Teachers receive online access free with membership.Annual print subscriptions are $33, $40 for online, $53 or online and print.Institutional subscriptions are (as expected). But I'd encourage your libraries to subscribe so that all of your faculty and students have access.
  • Seeking How to Teach articles

    Michael Cholbi
    6 Apr 2015 | 8:15 am
    Teaching Philosophy is continuing its highly successful 'How to Teach' series, articles focusing on how to teach common courses in philosophy curricula. Having published articles in the series on critical thinking, early modern philosophy, comparative philosophy, business ethics, metaphysics, and philosophy of science, the journal would be happy to receive proposals for articles focusing on any of the following courses:epistemologyphilosophy of languagephilosophy of religionancient philosophyenvironmental ethicspolitical philosophyphilosophy and/through filmphilosophy of lawthe…
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    Philosophy by the Way

  • The meaning of the ordinary

    30 Apr 2015 | 4:26 pm
    At the end of my last blog I wrote that selfies are seldom taken when you feel bad. Usually it is so that photos are taken of themes with a positive meaning; themes that are more than simply neutral let alone negative. Selfies, and by and large photos taken of yourself (and of other people not being you), don’t say: “That’s me ...” but “That’s me!” This is just an instance of a common characteristic of much photography. As Pierre Bourdieu analysed so well in his famous book An art moyen (A mean art), “You don’t photograph what you have before you all days” (p. 57). Or…
  • Your selfie and your soul

    26 Apr 2015 | 4:03 pm
    The image is the reflection of the soulIn his Philosophical Investigations Wittgenstein writes: “The human body is the best picture of the human soul.” (Part II, iv) In that context Wittgenstein gives the word “soul” a religious meaning, discussing the view that “[r]eligion teaches that the soul can exist when the body has disintegrated.” (ibid.) However, I think that we can give “soul” also a wider meaning, for example we can read it as “mind” or as “inner life”. Seen that way the idea expressed in the first quotation is in agreement with recent discoveries in…
  • Self in the era of selfie

    19 Apr 2015 | 4:30 pm
    SelfieToday we live in the era of images. Originally, making images was a real craft left to professional painters. With the arrival of photography (and film, but here I’ll talk only about photography), at first not so much changed. Making images was still left to professionals – photographers who mainly worked in studios – and a few exceptional hobbyists. This changed with the production of the Brownie camera by Kodak in 1900 and the introduction of the Leica 35 mm camera 25 years later. Now everybody could become a photographer, and indeed, more and more people took a camera in their…
  • The body and the self (2)

    12 Apr 2015 | 4:38 pm
    It's meWhen I saw someone yesterday and today I think that I see her again over there but I am not sure of it, I try to remember in detail how the woman I saw yesterday looked like and I compare her with the woman I see now, and then I draw my conclusion: She is the same person or she isn’t. However, when I can ask her “Is it possible that it were you whom I saw yesterday at the bus stop?”, I do not expect that she tries to bring up from her mind a physical description of a person at the bus stop yesterday and compares it with her appearance and then says: “Yes, it was me” or “No,…
  • The body and the self

    5 Apr 2015 | 4:11 pm
    The case of getting a new body is much discussed in philosophy but then in the form of a body or brain switch between two people. For the first time this has been done by John Locke (1632-1704), who analyzed the case of a prince getting the body of a cobbler. Since then the discussion has never stopped. It is mainly about the question: what determines the self? Basically there are two views. One is that it’s the body that makes up the self; the other is that the self is mental, be it in the “hard form” of the brain, be it the mind, or be it the memory. Sergio Canavero, who actually…
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    The Brooks Blog

  • Thom Brooks & Martha C. Nussbaum (eds), Rawls's Political Liberalism (2015) [UPDATE]

    27 Apr 2015 | 3:20 pm
      Rawls's Political Liberalism, ed. by Thom Brooks & Martha C. Nussbaum. New York: Columbia University Press, 2015. 224 pages Description Widely hailed as one of the most significant works in modern political philosophy, John Rawls's Political Liberalism (1993) defended a powerful vision of society that respects reasonable ways of life, both religious and secular. These core values have never been more critical as anxiety grows over political and religious difference and new restrictions are placed on peaceful protest and individual expression.This anthology of original…
  • Go on. Like this page on Facebook.

    27 Apr 2015 | 10:01 am
    Readers will know I've been working on the general election campaign as digital comms lead for Phil Wilson's re-election campaign. He's been MP for Sedgefield since 2007 -- Tony Blair previously held this seat. If you're on Facebook, then go on and 'like' his campaign page HERE.
  • Sedgefield CLP now on Facebook!

    21 Apr 2015 | 1:59 am
    READ MORE HERE.
  • Why Hegel Matters

    13 Apr 2015 | 5:00 pm
    . . . is the title of my public lecture this Wednesday at the Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. Further details found here.
  • The marginals that matter in the North East

    12 Apr 2015 | 1:22 pm
    . . . is the name of my new column for The Journal daily newspaper READ MORE HERE.
 
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    Continental Philosophy

  • THE GREEK DEBT CRISIS AND THE WAY FORWARD – Greece Solidarity Campaign

    James Luchte
    12 Apr 2015 | 7:16 pm
    THE GREEK DEBT CRISIS AND THE WAY FORWARD TUESDAY APRIL 28th 2015, 18.30 at Unite the Union, 128 Theobalds Rd, Holborn, London Public Event on Greek Debt Speakers: Sarah Jayne Clifton (Jubilee Debt Campaign) Christine Laskaridi (Corporate Watch) Olivier Vardakoulias (Syriza) Leonidas Vatikiotis (Antarsya and Member of the Audit Committee on the Greek Debt) Chair: Paul Mackney (Greece Solidarity Campaign)
  • Symposium Reeling/Realing: Wendy Hui Kyong Chun: Media: Thresholds and Habits

    James Luchte
    10 Apr 2015 | 6:30 pm
  • WorldBeyondWar.org – a global movement to end all wars

    James Luchte
    31 Mar 2015 | 5:09 pm
    World Beyond War’s new book A Global Security System: An Alternative to War is now available in eBook format, as well as paperback, audio, PDF, and website. World Beyond War’s director David Swanson has been nominated for the 2015 Nobel Peace Prize for his work with World Beyond War. We have big plans for the project outlined in the new book but can only continue if more of you help. Thank you to all of you who have already become recurring donors! If you become a recurring donor now for $10 / month or more you can choose from a list of great books or a sky blue scarf to receive…
  • Conference on Deleuze & Guattari, April 24-26, Athens, Greece

    James Luchte
    25 Mar 2015 | 3:02 pm
    Conference on Deleuze & Guattari, April 24-26, Athens, Greece  
  • Call for Papers – Nietzsche and Chinese Thought – The Agonist Fall 2015 Issue – The Nietzsche Circle – Final Deadline: August 31, 2015

    James Luchte
    9 Mar 2015 | 11:02 am
    Call for Papers Nietzsche and Chinese Thought – Fall 2015 Issue The Agonist – The Nietzsche Circle Guest Editor: Dr James Luchte Final Deadline: August 31, 2015 The Agonist is seeking essays for its Fall 2015 edition ‘Nietzsche and Chinese Thought.’ The essays for this edition have the opportunity of variety, due to the richness of this topic. Essays may cover firstly any aspect of the influence of Nietzschean thought upon Modern Chinese history, politics, literature, art, music, philosophy and/or religion. Secondly, the essays can be explorations of the myriad relationships…
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    In Living Color

  • Swastika Cakes and Gay Weddings

    7 Apr 2015 | 11:07 am
    It's so rare that Jon Stewart reasons badly, but I wonder about the reasoning in his Indiana piece last night.  Start at 3:45-- The Daily Show Daily Show Full Episodes,  More Daily Show Videos,  Comedy Central Full Episodes Mike Huckabee, Rick Santorum, etc., compare the baker who refuses to "do" a gay wedding with-- A gay printer who refuses to print signs saying "God hates fags" A
  • Pet Euthanasia

    9 Mar 2015 | 7:36 am
    Our soulful cat Snownose died on Saturday, from cancer, but with the help of euthanasia.  I've never had a cat euthanized before, though I've had many cats.  The whole month before, I had to work up the courage to do this, as did other family members.  I kept thinking about the conservative stance on euthanasia: that intentionally killing another person is always wrong.  (If this were right,
  • The Marquette Situation

    5 Feb 2015 | 9:28 am
    A word about Marquette's attempt to fire John McAdams.  One thing (among many) that bothers me is that Dean Holz's letter reveals a double standard.  In the second paragraph he charges McAdams with trying to "silence the less-powerful" but nowhere in the letter does he voice any concern at all about the undergraduate--who is the less powerful person in the instructor-student relationship.  Here
  • Sexual Misconduct on College Campuses

    1 Dec 2014 | 11:43 am
    Every week there's another appalling story about the way college campuses deal with sexual misconduct.  A Rolling Stone investigation of UVA shows that on some campuses there's not much of a response even if  a student complains of being gang raped by seven men at a frat party. Among many astonishing details in the story: there were 38 allegations of sexual assault in a recent one year period at
  • "I should but I'm not going to"

    1 Dec 2014 | 9:17 am
    This phrase intrigues me, every time I think about the fact that I'm not a vegan. Here are some interesting and relevant reflections from someone who's neither a vegan nor a vegetarian.
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    Stephen Law

  • CFI UK EVENT: Event Title: Searching for Satan: Miscarriages of memory, fractured families and Satanic panics

    19 Apr 2015 | 5:39 am
    (Photo: Wikipedia/Creative Commons; design: Lauren Wade)Centre for Inquiry UK and Anomalistic Psychology research Unit, Goldsmiths present:Searching for Satan: Miscarriages of memory, fractured families and Satanic panicsDiscover how the unreliability of memory has led to grave miscarriages of justice, including panics about Satanic abuse. Can memories really be ‘recovered’ by therapists? To what extent can we rely on the memories of witnesses in historic abuse cases? Some deeply disturbing cases will be investigated.6th June 2015Venue: Room LG02 in the Professor Stuart Hall Building…
  • RELIGIOUS EPISTEMOLOGY: A CONFERENCE FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC AT HEYTHROP COLLEGE

    19 Apr 2015 | 4:25 am
    The Royal Institute of Philosophy presents RELIGIOUS EPISTEMOLOGY:A CONFERENCE FOR THE GENERAL PUBLIC AT HEYTHROP COLLEGE19th and 20th June 2015Heythrop College, University of London, Kensington Square, London W8 5HN (very close to Kensington High St. tube)Funds for video-recording talks have been provided by The Templeton Foundation.This is a free, two-day conference aimed at the general public. It makes accessible some of the exciting, cutting edge work recently done in religious epistemology. All speakers are leading figures in the field (two are flying in specially from the States).Talks…
  • Today's powerpoint at Manwood school - religious language

    25 Mar 2015 | 2:21 pm
    n  Religious Languagen  Stephen Lawn  Verification, Falsification, Wittgensteinn  In this session we will:n  Outline Ayer’s Verification Principle and his attack on the meaningfulness of religious language (plus criticisms)n  Outline Flew’s use of falsification (plus criticisms).n  Outline some Wittgensteinian moves to defend religion (plus criticisms). n  Ayern  A. J. Ayer’s key principle is the verification principle (VP). It is a principle about meaning:n  A statement is meaningful iff. it is verifiablen  (for non-analytic…
  • 'Has Science Buried God?' Opening statement from my debate in Trondheim Norway

    11 Mar 2015 | 12:02 pm
     (Photo - hall starting to fill before the debate) Here's my opening statement from today's debate with Christian evangelist and debater Peter Payne in Trondheim, Norway today.  HAS SCIENCE BURIED GOD? Thank you to the organisers for inviting me to participate in this excellent event. I'm delighted to be here.  In one of his online resources Peter Payne says, and I quote:  "The net of scientific method, namely the net of hypothesis and experimental/observational test, is unable to demonstrate either the truth or falsity of the Christian faith, for it is simply…
  • Baudrillard - J'accuse! (again)

    26 Feb 2015 | 8:02 am
    The Radio 3 The Verb programme, in which I discuss pseudo-profundity (with some analytic vs continental philosophy discussion), is repeated tomorrow night at 10pm GMT on Radio 3. It will be availabe for a week on bbc radio iplayer. Below is my old post concerning that programme. Link to programme website here.Here is a quote from Baudrillard that Prof Paul Taylor chose for the Radio 3 programme we recorded to be broadcast tonite at 10pm (I am talking about pseudo-profundity and bullshit and pointing a finger at some post-modern thinkers - listen here for a week [I am on from about…
 
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    Alexander Pruss's Blog

  • Everettian quantum mechanics and functionalism about mind

    1 May 2015 | 9:35 am
    On the Everett interpretation of quantum mechanics, the wavefunction is the whole truth about the physical world. Moreover, the wavefunction never collapses, and we live in a vast multiverse. On functionalism about mind, mental properties supervene on functional properties of the world. We can specify this further: it could be that all mental properties supervene on functional properties of the world, or just the non-qualitative ones or just the narrow-content non-qualitative ones. My argument will work in all these cases.I claim that the Everett interpretation and functionalism about mind…
  • Brains and animalism

    29 Apr 2015 | 11:58 am
    Animalists hold that we are animals. It is widely accepted by animalists that if a brain were removed from a body, and the body kept alive, the person would stay with the bulk of the body rather than go with the brain.I wonder how much of the intuition is based on irrelevant questions of physical bulk. Imagine aliens who are giant brains with tiny support organs—lungs, heart, legs, etc.—dwarfed by the brain. I think we might have the intuition that if the brain were disconnected from the support organs, the animal would go with the brain. In the case of beings that dwarf their brains, it…
  • Self-ownership and organ sale

    29 Apr 2015 | 10:10 am
    Things owned can be permissibly traded, barring special circumstances. Trade in persons is never permissible. Thus, no one owns a person. (By 1-3) Thus, no person owns herself. (By 4) (By the same argument, God doesn't own us, either. We belong to God, of course, but not by way of ownership.) Let's continue thinking about self-ownership: If x is not simple and I own every proper part of x, I own x. I don't own myself. (By 4 and as I am a person) I am not simple. So, there is a proper part of me that I don't own. (By 5-7) All my proper parts are on par with respect to my ownership of them. So,…
  • Convincing

    29 Apr 2015 | 5:06 am
    Free will is incompatible with (causal) determinism, and I know it. I know it because I have sound arguments for it, with compelling premises. It is good for people to know the truth about things that matter, and this is one of them. So I should be glad, for your sake and not just out of vanity, if I convinced you by one of these compelling arguments. And I would be glad. But perhaps I shouldn't be glad if I convinced everyone, and that's for two reasons. First, there actually being compatibilists helps keep incompatibilist investigators honest and leads to a deeper understanding of the ways…
  • A quick argument for the bijection principle

    28 Apr 2015 | 9:36 am
    The bijection principle says that if we have two sets A and B and we can pair up all the objects of the two sets, then the the sets have the same number of members. Some people don't like the bijection principle because it leads to the counterintuitive conclusion that there are as many primes as natural numbers. Here's an argument for the bijection principle. Let's run the argument directly for the above controversial case—that should be enough of an intuition pump to get the general principle. Take infinitely many pieces of paper that are red on one side and blue on the other. Number the…
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    The Splintered Mind

  • Duplicating the Universe

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    29 Apr 2015 | 9:16 am
    I've been thinking about two forms of duplication. One is duplication of the entire universe from beginning to end, as envisioned in Nietzsche's eternal return (cf. Poincare's recurrence theorem on a grand scale). The other is duplication within an eternal (or very long) individual life (goldfish-pool immortality). In both cases, I find myself torn among four different evaluative perspectives. For color, imagine a god watching our universe from Big Bang to heat death. At the end, this god says, "In total, that was good. Replay!" Or imagine an immortal life in which you loop repeatedly…
  • How to Make Van Gogh's "Starry Night" Undulate

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    27 Apr 2015 | 7:43 am
    Not sure the original source of this one (maybe notbecauseitsironic on Reddit?). First, look at the center of the image below for about 30 seconds. Look at the center of this image for 30sec, then watch Van Gogh's *Starry Night* come to life Then look at Van Gogh's "The Starry Night". The technique also achieves interesting results when applied to Kincade: [HT Mariano Aski]
  • New Essay: Death and Self in the Incomprehensible Zhuangzi

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    23 Apr 2015 | 4:40 pm
    Every nineteen years, I should write a new essay on the ancient Chinese philosopher Zhuangzi, don't you think? This one should tide me over until 2034, then! Death and Self in the Incomprehensible Zhuangzi The ancient Chinese philosopher Zhuangzi defies interpretation. This is an inextricable part of the beauty and power of his work. The text – by which I mean the “Inner Chapters” of the text traditionally attributed to him, the authentic core of the book – is incomprehensible as a whole. It consists of shards, in a distinctive voice – a voice distinctive enough that its absence is…
  • Rules of War, the Card Game, with Deck Management

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    22 Apr 2015 | 1:34 pm
    I think you'll agree that few games are as tedious as the card game war. Unfortunately, my eight-year-old daughter likes the damned thing. So I cooked up some new rules, which make the game considerably more interesting and quicker to resolve. (What does this have to do with the themes of this blog? Um. If widely adopted, the new rules will substantially reduce humanity's card-game-related dyshedons!) War with Deck Management Simple Rules for Two Players: Deal the 52-card deck face down, 26 cards to each player. As in standard war, each player turns their top card face up on the table. High…
  • How to Disregard Extremely Remote Possibilities

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    16 Apr 2015 | 10:35 am
    In 1% Skepticism, I suggest that it's reasonable to have about a 1% credence that some radically skeptical scenario holds (e.g., this is a dream or we're in a short-term sim), sometimes making decisions that we wouldn't otherwise make based upon those small possibilities (e.g., deciding to try to fly, or choosing to read a book rather than weed when one is otherwise right on the cusp). But what about extremely remote possibilities with extremely large payouts? Maybe it's reasonable to have a one in 10^50 credence in the existence of a deity who would give me at least 10^50 lifetimes' worth of…
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    In the Space of Reasons

  • Philosophy as creative writing?

    1 May 2015 | 3:27 am
    I had an interesting misunderstanding with a friend, Jo, this week about the creativity involved in writing philosophy. I think it may have begun with some confusion on my part stemming from momentarily forgetting that ‘creative writing’ is a proper name for a genre as well as being an adjectival qualification of an activity. It might also have been influenced by Jo’s background in advertising, a business that seems to me to mythologise creativity in its absolute distinction between ‘creatives’ and everyone else.We were discussing - at a funeral - the common intuition that a…
  • Another draft nursing textbook chapter

    29 Apr 2015 | 8:39 am
    AbstractBy its very nature, mental healthcare raises a number of key conceptual questions calling for philosophical, rather than empirical, inquiry. This chapter outlines some of the answers that have been proposed to, perhaps, the most central question: what is a mental illness? We then discuss links between answers to this question and concerns about the justification of coercion in mental healthcare, shared decisions about recovery, and the objectivity, or otherwise, of psychiatric taxonomy.IntroductionMental illness and mental healthcare raise a number of difficult and deep questions.
  • Durham IAS Fellowship Recruitment 2016/17

    24 Apr 2015 | 7:03 am
    "Dear former IAS Fellow, I am delighted to announce that the IAS Fellowship Scheme for 2016/17 is now open for recruitment. The theme for 2016/17 is ‘Scale’ and I would be very grateful if you could alert relevant colleagues in your department, institute or networks about this opportunity and indeed encourage them to apply for a fellowship. As ever, the IAS is very keen to attract applications from prominent scholars and non-academics to support our commitment to recruiting fellows from across the world. We think this theme will be of great interest to a wide range of scholars…
  • Mind and Society 2.0 videos

    23 Apr 2015 | 6:35 am
    A link to the talks given at Mind & Society 2.0: a conference on philosophy and ethnomethodology held at MMU, Manchester, March 30th and 31st 2015.The idiot in the first talk keeps walking out of frame.
  • Bootstrapping conceptual normativity?

    22 Apr 2015 | 2:11 am
    AbstractBoth anti-reductionist and reductionist accounts of linguistic meaning and mental content face challenges accounting for acquiring concepts as part of learning a first language. Anti-reductionists cannot account for a transition from the pre-conceptual to conceptual without threatening to reduce the latter to the former. Reductionists of a representationalist variety face the challenge of Fodor’s argument that language learning is impossible.This paper examines whether Ginsborg’s account of ‘primitive normativity’ might provide some resources for addressing these issues. I…
 
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    Freemason Information

  • THE MEANING OF LIFE

    TimBryce
    24 Apr 2015 | 3:00 am
    BRYCE ON LIFE – It is ultimately about good versus evil. (Click for AUDIO VERSION) To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request. In the Monty Python movie, “The Meaning of Life,” the troupe offers a tongue-in-cheek explanation; “Well, it’s nothing very special: Try to be nice to people; avoid eating fat; read a good book every now and then; get some walking in; and try to live together in peace and harmony with people of all creeds and nations.” Their explanation was very succinct and made for a humorous ending to the film.
  • The Durhams Of Fairfield

    Fred Milliken
    21 Apr 2015 | 2:48 pm
      Dr., Rev., Bro. Robert L. Uzzel and Bro. Frederic L. Milliken Past Grand Historian of the Most Worshipful Prince Hall Grand Lodge of Texas, Dr. Rev. Bro. Robert L. Uzzel,  has a new book out, “The Durhams of Fairfield.” This is Uzzel’s Roots story, tracing his wife’s family genealogy. The Durhams, Black and White, originated in Fairfield County, South Carolina. Those that were slaves later moved with their Masters to DeSoto Parish, Louisiana.  From the early 1850s to 1930 DeSoto Parish was the home of Mansfield Female College, the oldest female college west of the Mississippi…
  • The Christianization of Freemasonry

    Greg Stewart
    13 Apr 2015 | 3:57 am
    In this installment of Symbols & Symbolism, we look at a reading from Albert G. Mackey’s Encyclopedia of Freemasonry on the Christening of Freemasonry, a sentiment that Mackey feels “… does not belong to the ancient system” of Freemasonry. You can read more installments of Mackey’s Encyclopedia under Symbols & Symbolism here on this site and video of these segments on YouTube. The interpretation of the symbols of Freemasonry from a Christian point of view is a theory adopted by some of the most distinguished Masonic writers of England and this country,…
  • Happy Patriots Day

    Fred Milliken
    12 Apr 2015 | 2:17 am
        Once again it is time for The Beehive’s annual Patriot’s Day message. Patriots Day is an obscure holiday celebrated in just one county – Middlesex – in Massachusetts. In the early years of our nation it was a National holiday but gradually July 4th supplanted a similar celebration. Patriot’s Day commemorates the first battles of the American Revolution in Lexington and Concord, Massachusetts on April 19, 1775 where the shot was fired heard round the world. Having been born and raised in Lexington, the history of these battles was ingrained in me from an early age and…
  • Where Freemasonry Is Open Misinformation Of The Craft Is Dispelled

    Fred Milliken
    9 Apr 2015 | 6:58 pm
    This is not your grandfather’s Freemasonry, at least not in Boston and the Grand Lodge AF & AM. Freemasonry has opened up in the last 50 years, sharing its goals and purpose with the public so that they can be better understood. And the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts has been at the forefront of this openness. It was four years ago that Massachusetts launched its Ben Franklin series that described the Fraternity to the general public. There is a concerted effort here to dispel some of the myths and misinformation that has been allowed to exist by tight lipped Freemasons and reach out to…
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    Philosophy News

  • Survival in the English Department

    3 May 2015 | 6:34 pm
    Jonathan Gottschall tried to save literary studies by importing evolutionary theory. Instead he ruined his academic career… more»Continue reading . . . News source: Arts & Letters Daily
  • A Companion to W.V.O. Quine

    3 May 2015 | 6:33 pm
    2015.05.01 : View this Review Online | View Recent NDPR Reviews Gilbert Harman and Ernie LePore (eds.), A Companion to W.V.O. Quine, Wiley-Blackwell, 2014, 581pp., $195.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780470672105. Reviewed by Richard Woodward, Emmy Noether Research Group, University of Hamburg Few figures can be claimed to have had a greater impact on post-war analytic philosophy than W.V.O. Quine. His influence on contemporary philosophy, and the consequent familiarity of his thinking, often belies the radical and revolutionary nature of his work. Like any revolutionary, Quine had destructive intentions,…
  • The Happiness Industry

    3 May 2015 | 6:02 pm
    Mood-tracking apps, chief happiness officers, positive psychology: When did being miserable become socially unacceptable?… more»Continue reading . . . News source: Arts & Letters Daily
  • Moral of Caesar

    3 May 2015 | 6:01 pm
    The assassination of Julius Caesar failed in its stated purpose, to end tyranny. “The world without Caesar was still a world about Caesar”… more»Continue reading . . . News source: Arts & Letters Daily
  • Question about Language - Douglas Burnham responds

    3 May 2015 | 3:50 am
    Can a word be used incorrectly and still be 'useful'? I've heard that pragmatists define true statements as those that are useful in predicting future empirical outcomes, to quote Wikipedia. However, I have heard of words being used incorrectly that can still be 'useful' despite being incorrect. The words 'subjective' and 'objective' are often used in everyday language to divide and distingiush things that are 'a matter of opinion' from things that are 'a matter of fact', respectively. Although this is an oversimplified and incorrect use of the words, you can't deny that people still find…
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    The Mindful Word

  • SELFISHLY SELFLESS: Enlightened self-interest and the myth of pure altruism

    Jane Olivier
    3 May 2015 | 6:56 am
    SELFISHLY SELFLESS: Enlightened self-interest and the myth of pure altruism Is it possible to do things with absolutely no expectation of a return? Is there such a thing as a completely selfless act? Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • THE OZ EFFECT: Hypocritical taker of the Hippocratic Oath

    editor
    1 May 2015 | 12:10 pm
    THE OZ EFFECT: Hypocritical oaf of the Hippocratic Oath. Recently on NPR, Robert Seigel asked Michael Specter, a staff writer from the New Yorker, who he would bet on to win: Dr. Oz or the physicians who have raised a petition against his position at Columbia University. Specter answered in a heartbeat: “Oz, sorry to say.” Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • FIND JOY AT WORK: Using mindfulness practice to find ease and equanimity in the workplace

    Tammy Klein
    29 Apr 2015 | 12:44 pm
    “We can work in such a way that we realize we have a lot of choices in what we do and how we do it. […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • TICK-TOCK: Lyme disease patients are tired of waiting

    editor
    28 Apr 2015 | 12:33 pm
    TICK-TOCK: Lyme disease patients are tired of waiting With pickets raised and candles lit, Lyme disease patients and advocates stood in front of The New York Times building in New York City for a silent vigil on September 17, 2014. Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • DISCOVERING YOUR PURPOSE: Live a life of joy, love and fulfillment

    editor
    27 Apr 2015 | 1:38 pm
    DISCOVERING YOUR PURPOSE: Live a life of joy, love and fulfillment There is, without a doubt, a purpose for your life. There is a reason why you are here. There are things you were meant to do and be in this lifetime. You are connected with everyone and everything that has stood for that purpose that has ever been or ever will be. Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
 
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    The Philosophers' Cocoon

  • Job Market Boot Camp, Part 8: The Cover Letter

    Marcus Arvan
    2 May 2015 | 9:02 am
    Now that we have examined building and composing CVs, obtaining recommendation letters, the European job market, job-market consultants, and developing a coherent research program, I would like to move onto the rest of the standard job-market dossier materials, beginning with cover letters. Some readers might wonder why I'm going over dossier materials so early, given that it's only May and the main US job market doesn't heat up for several months for now. The answer is two-fold. First, foreign job markets are currently in full-swing. It seems like I'm receiving foreign…
  • Amen

    Marcus Arvan
    1 May 2015 | 3:13 pm
    This post on the role that verbal performance and confidence play in philosophy has received attention elsewhere. Most of the attention I have come across so far focuses on the socio-moral concerns--regarding silencing--raised in the following passages: There is a telling anecdote about G.E.M. Anscombe and A.J. Ayer. Anscombe said to Ayer, “You know, if you didn’t talk so fast, no one would think you were so clever.” Ayer rapidly replied, “And if you didn’t talk so slowly, no one would think you were so very wise... The common thread in all this theatrical business is that these…
  • On (not) being a ghost of a person

    Marcus Arvan
    27 Apr 2015 | 12:40 pm
    This may sound melodramatic and/or portentous at first, but sometimes I feel like a ghost of a person, and I wonder how many other people there are in the discipline who have a similar feeling. Let me explain what I mean, and why I thought it might be worth writing on and discussing. I was watching the film Zero Dark Thirty on TV this weekend, and was struck by a particular scene where the main character is asked by the CIA Director what else she had been working on the past decade besides attempting to track down Osama bin Laden. Her response, delivered flatly and without hesitation is:…
  • Loneliness, lemons, and lemonade

    Marcus Arvan
    26 Apr 2015 | 7:26 am
    I have been following this interesting thread on the positives and negatives of becoming a professional philosopher all week (also see here) and was struck by--and identified a bit with--the following comment on professional loneliness after graduate school: I agree with all of the positives listed above. However this negative has yet to be mentioned, and it's been a big one for me as I decide whether to continue in the profession: Loneliness. As a graduate student you are (hopefully) part of a fairly large community of scholars who work on similar or overlapping issues/areas as you. The…
  • How to know God? —UPDATED

    Elisa Freschi
    23 Apr 2015 | 2:06 am
    Basically, we can either claim that God can be known through reason ---with or without further empirical evidence--- (Samuel Clarke, Anthony Collins, Voltaire, Kant, Nyāya, Śaivasiddhānta…) or that S/He can be known through personal insight and/or Sacred Texts (Śrī Vaiṣṇavas after Yāmuna, Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇavas…). (image by Arne Niklas Jansson) The first attitude could lead to a rational theology, or even to deism, as it happened during the Enlightenment, since it presupposes that all human beings could equally reach an adequate knowledge of God, if only they were to apply…
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    iai.tv news RSS feed

  • Editorial: Beyond Knowledge

    Editor
    22 Apr 2015 | 11:11 pm
    650 events, 370 acts, 200 speakers, 11 days, 9 stages: HowTheLightGetsIn, the world’s largest philosophy and music festival, is back and bigger than ever. In this issue of IAI News we look ahead to the key ideas at this year’s festival. The theme for 2015 is ‘Fantasy and Reality’: is knowledge an illusion, a straitjacket we should escape to discover new worlds? Or is the pursuit of definitive knowledge vital to our future? Science will be a crucial battleground. Templeton prize winning cosmologist and mathematician George Ellis will unpick cause and effect in cosmology, as he explains…
  • Beyond Left and Right

    Pippa Malmgren
    21 Mar 2015 | 1:28 am
    The words “left” and “right” are no longer of real significance. Some people still do not understand that the debt burden in Britain and across the industrialised world is so large that it cannot be paid down. The belief persists that if taxes on the rich could be raised a bit more, that would fix it. But, even if all citizens were taxed 100% of their income, the debt burden would still surpass the income. Therefore, there is no longer a very fruitful debate to be had between the “left” and the “right”. The bigger question is: what is the appropriate relationship between the…
  • A Material World?

    John Heil
    8 Mar 2015 | 6:43 am
    More than 50 years ago Wilfrid Sellars challenged philosophers to explain how to reconcile the universe as we ordinarily experience it with what issues from the sciences, especially physics. In 1963’s Science, Perception, and Reality, he wrote: The philosopher is confronted not by one complex many-dimensional picture, the unity of which, such as it is, he must come to appreciate; but by two pictures of essentially the same order of complexity, each of which purports to be a complete picture of man-in-the-world, and which, after separate scrutiny, he must fuse into one vision. Let me refer…
  • A New Model of Consciousness

    Daniel Stoljar
    8 Mar 2015 | 6:37 am
    Do we need a radically new model to explain the place of consciousness in the material world? The answer is yes, because both old models are failing. Old model #1 is materialism – also known as physicalism – which says that consciousness is a function of organised matter. The problem with materialism is that on any known view of what matter is, consciousness is palpably not a function of it. This is the lesson of the famous set of arguments about matter and consciousness in philosophy: the superscientist Mary, philosophical zombies, the inverted spectrum, etc. Old model #2 is dualism,…
  • Expert Lies

    Matthew Parris
    8 Mar 2015 | 6:31 am
    We rely on experts in every field. Yet from economists to climate scientists they hold wildly disparate views. Might the very idea of objective knowledge be illusory and expertise be a form of institutional power? If we were more sceptical would it lead to democracy or bring chaos? Matthew Parris is a writer, broadcaster and former Conservative MP. He writes columns for the Times and the Spectator as well as presenting Radio 4’s Great Lives. Here he speaks to the IAI about expertise, vested interests, and the importance of a healthy kind of scepticism.   Daniel Rhodes: In the debate on IAI…
 
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    A Brighter Everyday

  • Killing Impossibility with Effort

    Enock Machodi
    28 Apr 2015 | 11:37 am
    Everything at this moment sucks! And nothing is worth trying… That’s the impression I get from the frown on your face, simply because nothing seems to be working in your favor. Right? It seems like you’ve been living in a world of impossibilities and… …with every ticking second, you get the assumption that your dreams… Read More The post Killing Impossibility with Effort appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • The Best Ideas in 2015 won’t always come from you

    Enock
    20 Apr 2015 | 6:32 pm
    …Ideas. Yes. So elusive in a way that’s untold but at one point it crosses our minds and, Every one of us wants to come up with one or two. Elusive in a way we tend to give them up or even forget about the last idea that came up on our minds. It could… Read More The post The Best Ideas in 2015 won’t always come from you appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • Is this the Unsexy Three-Rule Clue to Understanding Your Passion?

    Enock Machodi
    10 Apr 2015 | 3:05 pm
    What do you know about passion? In my view, passion is an emotion that portrays realism, and is kinda powerful too. The truth is your believe about finding passion could be wrong. As a general rule of the thumb, you need to know that all emotions exist for good reasons. For example, you feel thirsty… Read More The post Is this the Unsexy Three-Rule Clue to Understanding Your Passion? appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • One Factor Lies Between You and Success

    Enock
    2 Apr 2015 | 3:01 pm
    Everyone dreams about success in life but very few manage to have these dreams fulfilled. As a blogger who is focused on succeeding in what I do, I try everyday to work effortlessly by being consistent in what I do online. Perhaps you may have come across Sharon Mundia, Sue Anne, Pauline Cabrera, Katy Cowan… Read More The post One Factor Lies Between You and Success appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • Enjoying My Saturday Moments

    Enock Machodi
    28 Mar 2015 | 9:25 am
    I had nothing much to do on this day, so I thought it was a good idea to spend time out with friends. This is what went down in my world of eating… BREAKFAST Marinated carrot tomato soup Sandwiches Pork Sausage Eggs Bacon LUNCH Fries Fish Veg Salad Red Wine Folks! This is how my… Read More The post Enjoying My Saturday Moments appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
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    Papercuts

  • Is Feminism the new Patriarchy? 6 reasons why you shouldn’t be a feminist

    kaytus89
    3 May 2015 | 7:37 am
    Intellectual equality, equal pay and female rights are aspects of feminist movements that no one would disagree with. However, certain feminist groups have taken their role too far and are in many ways doing more harm than good. Here are some reasons why you should think twice before buying into certain aspects of feminist ideology: 1-  It undermines traditional female roles. Certain prominent female figures have been known to attack traditional female roles.  Not too long ago, a feminist blogger called Amy Glass sparked outrage due to a post titled: ‘’I Look Down On Young Women…
  • 10 life lessons you can learn from horror movies

    kaytus89
    27 Apr 2015 | 7:04 am
    1- If you hear a strange noise, never investigate it. Seriously why ask a question you don’t want the answer to? 2- An unlocked house or building is NOT an invitation to walk in. 3- Mirrors can reveal more than you expect…get rid of them, especially the ones in the toilet. 4- The next time you witness a murder, just drive in the opposite direction… 5- If you run over a man, it might be a good idea to just tell the police…that, or risk being stalked and murdered by a vengeful psychopath. 6- Appreciate your life and loved ones. Or this old man will make you pay. 7- If…
  • ‘Stop loving your country!’ Six reasons why nationalism is ruining the world

    kaytus89
    21 Apr 2015 | 6:33 am
    Loving your country and having a strong national identity are basic sentiments that are commonly found around the world. But what many individuals may not be aware of, is that these attitudes are in fact far from innocent and can even become dangerous. And here are some reasons why: 1- It creates an ‘us’ vs ‘them’ mentality. With the birth of the nation, new borders were created. Although national identity is useful in uniting citizens from different backgrounds under one common banner, it also excludes those on the other side of the border.  2- It’s a tool for mass manipulation…
  • Hilarious Saudi Expressions you Should Know

    kaytus89
    19 Apr 2015 | 5:32 am
    Every culture has its quirks and strange sayings, and in Saudi, these are taken to another level. I’ve listed some hilarious expressions that are commonly used in my hometown Safwa in the Eastern Province. Of course, some of these sayings may not be exclusive to Safwa or even Saudi, but I’ve included them nonetheless to give a general taste of the region’s popular culture. I will stomp your liver  -بادوس في جبدك This is a violent and effective threat that is commonly used in everyday speech when you’re really frustrated with someone.  This liver motif is…
  • Freedom of Speech Sucks, and this is why

    kaytus89
    16 Apr 2015 | 5:53 am
    So last night I watched the hilariously offensive ‘The Interview’, which is the key inspiration behind this post.  The basic premise of the movie is that two of the dumbest men in America are able to take down the regime in North Korea and assassinate its President, Kim Jong-un. Naturally, the movie sparked a great deal of outrage from the North Korean regime which threatened retaliation. Sony Pictures was subsequently hacked, cinema screenings of the movie were cancelled and Obama even made a statement against the acceptance of any form of censorship from a foreign country.   So this…
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