Philosophy

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Attrition rates in philosophy PhD programs in the U.S.

    Leiter Reports: A Philosophy Blog
    Brian Leiter
    28 Nov 2014 | 7:50 am
    The median is around 60%! It's fairly high across other fields too. (Thanks to Brad Wray for the pointer.)
  • Thoughts on the Ferguson Verdict

    Talking Philosophy
    Mike LaBossiere
    26 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/149272583 In August of 2014 police officer Darren Wilson shot the unarmed Michael Brown to death. On November 24, 2014 a grand jury in Missouri failed to indict police officer Darren Wilson. Like most Americans, I have some thoughts about this matter. In the United States, a grand jury’s function is to determine whether or not there is probable cause to prosecute. This level of proof is much lower than that of a criminal trial—such a trial requires (in theory) proof beyond a reasonable doubt. Unlike in a criminal trial, the grand jury is effectively run…
  • Kant's Philosophical Development

    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
    Martin Schönfeld and Michael Thompson
    25 Nov 2014 | 6:50 pm
    [Revised entry by Martin Schönfeld and Michael Thompson on November 25, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Modern philosophy begins with Kant, and yet he marks the end of the "Modern" epoch (1600 - 1800 AD/CE) in the history of philosophy.[1] The appearance of the Critique of Pure Reason in 1781 marks the end of the modern period and the beginning of something entirely new. Today his texts are read on all continents, and his thought has...
  • Protests, Peaceful & Otherwise

    Talking Philosophy
    Mike LaBossiere
    27 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/459550624 In response to the nighttime announcement of the Ferguson verdict in which officer Wilson was not indicted, some people attacked the police and damaged property. Some experts have been critical of the decision to make the announcement at night, since the time of day does actually influence how people behave. In general, making such an announcement at night is a bad idea—unless one intends to increase the chances that people will respond badly. Obviously enough, peacefully protesting is a basic right and in a democratic state the police should not…
  • Question about Ethics, Love - Allen Stairs responds

    AskPhilosophers.org | "All"
    28 Nov 2014 | 9:09 am
    I am in love with my brother's ex-girlfriend of 2 years. Over those 2 years, we became best friends and I developed feelings for her. My question is, now that my brother and her are no longer together, is MORALLY wrong to start a relationship with her? Here is what I have considered: From what I have learned about objective morality/ethics I could follow the Golden Rule "Treat other as you would want to be treated". I have dismissed this on the basis that yes, if I were my brother I would be annoyed by my brother dating my ex, but I would also want my brother to be happy and, after weighing…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

  • Kant's Philosophical Development

    Martin Schönfeld and Michael Thompson
    25 Nov 2014 | 6:50 pm
    [Revised entry by Martin Schönfeld and Michael Thompson on November 25, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, notes.html] Modern philosophy begins with Kant, and yet he marks the end of the "Modern" epoch (1600 - 1800 AD/CE) in the history of philosophy.[1] The appearance of the Critique of Pure Reason in 1781 marks the end of the modern period and the beginning of something entirely new. Today his texts are read on all continents, and his thought has...
  • Metaphysical Grounding

    Ricki Bliss and Kelly Trogdon
    25 Nov 2014 | 2:36 pm
    [New Entry by Ricki Bliss and Kelly Trogdon on November 25, 2014.] Consider the following three philosophical claims made by Plato, Russell, and Kripke, respectively: (i) an act is lovable by the gods in virtue of its being pious, (ii) complexes exist because simples exist, and (iii) the fact that our use of the term 'Aristotle' is causally connected in the right kind of way to how it was originally used explains why...
  • Nelson Goodman

    Daniel Cohnitz and Marcus Rossberg
    21 Nov 2014 | 7:05 pm
    [New Entry by Daniel Cohnitz and Marcus Rossberg on November 21, 2014.] Henry Nelson Goodman (1906 - 1998) was one of the most influential philosophers of the post-war era of American philosophy. Goodman's philosophical interests ranged from formal logic and the philosophy of science to the philosophy of art. In all these diverse fields Goodman made significant and highly original contributions. Perhaps his most famous contribution is the...
  • Ancient Political Philosophy

    Melissa Lane
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:38 pm
    [Revised entry by Melissa Lane on November 21, 2014. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Ancient political philosophy is understood here to mean ancient Greek and Roman thought from the classical period of Greek thought in the fifth century BCE to the end of the Roman empire in the West in the fifth century CE, excluding the rise of Christian ideas about...
  • Privacy and Information Technology

    Jeroen van den Hoven, Martijn Blaauw, Wolter Pieters, and Martijn Warnier
    20 Nov 2014 | 11:19 pm
    [New Entry by Jeroen van den Hoven, Martijn Blaauw, Wolter Pieters, and Martijn Warnier on November 20, 2014.] Human beings value their privacy and the protection of their personal sphere of life. They value some control over who knows what about them. They certainly do not want their personal information to be accessible to just anyone at any time. But recent advances in information technology threaten privacy and have reduced the amount of control over personal data and open up the possibility of a range of...
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Talking Philosophy

  • Protests, Peaceful & Otherwise

    Mike LaBossiere
    27 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/459550624 In response to the nighttime announcement of the Ferguson verdict in which officer Wilson was not indicted, some people attacked the police and damaged property. Some experts have been critical of the decision to make the announcement at night, since the time of day does actually influence how people behave. In general, making such an announcement at night is a bad idea—unless one intends to increase the chances that people will respond badly. Obviously enough, peacefully protesting is a basic right and in a democratic state the police should not…
  • Thoughts on the Ferguson Verdict

    Mike LaBossiere
    26 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/149272583 In August of 2014 police officer Darren Wilson shot the unarmed Michael Brown to death. On November 24, 2014 a grand jury in Missouri failed to indict police officer Darren Wilson. Like most Americans, I have some thoughts about this matter. In the United States, a grand jury’s function is to determine whether or not there is probable cause to prosecute. This level of proof is much lower than that of a criminal trial—such a trial requires (in theory) proof beyond a reasonable doubt. Unlike in a criminal trial, the grand jury is effectively run…
  • Gun Violence & Mental Illness, Again

    Mike LaBossiere
    24 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    Rethink Mental Illness (Photo credit: Wikipedia) On November 20, 2014 Myron May allegedly shot three people on the FSU campus in Tallahassee, Florida. He was shot to death after allegedly firing at the police. I did not know May, but I do know people who did—that is the sort of place Tallahassee is: if you don’t know someone, you know someone who does. While the wounding of the three people was terrible, May can be seen as the fourth victim. I did know that May had been a cross-country runner, that he had graduated from FSU and then had gone on to law school. During most of his life, May…
  • Bionic Ethics

    Mike LaBossiere
    21 Nov 2014 | 5:00 am
    http://www.gettyimages.com/detail/51256116 Although bionics have been part of science fiction for quite some time (a well-known example is the Six Million Dollar Man), the reality of prosthetics has long been rather disappointing. But, thanks to America’s endless wars and recent advances in technology, bionic prosthetics are now a reality. There are now replacement legs that replicate the functionality of the original organics amazingly well. There have also been advances in prosthetic arms and hands as well as progress in artificial sight.  As with all technology, these bionic devices…
  • Evidence: a love-story

    Rupert Read
    20 Nov 2014 | 7:55 am
    Philosophers! I have a proposition to put to you. Nowadays, we would-be rational members of the public, the intellectually-minded, many citizens, are too in love with the concept of evidence. Perhaps this surprises you. Maybe you’re thinking: if only! If only enough attention were paid to the massive evidence that dangerous climate change is happening, and that it’s human-triggered. Or: if only the epidemiological evidence marshalled by Wilkinson and Pickett — that more inequality makes society worse in almost every conceivable way — were acted upon. But actually, even in…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    AskPhilosophers.org | "All"

  • Question about Ethics, Love - Allen Stairs responds

    28 Nov 2014 | 9:09 am
    I am in love with my brother's ex-girlfriend of 2 years. Over those 2 years, we became best friends and I developed feelings for her. My question is, now that my brother and her are no longer together, is MORALLY wrong to start a relationship with her? Here is what I have considered: From what I have learned about objective morality/ethics I could follow the Golden Rule "Treat other as you would want to be treated". I have dismissed this on the basis that yes, if I were my brother I would be annoyed by my brother dating my ex, but I would also want my brother to be happy and, after weighing…
  • Question about Business, Ethics - Oliver Leaman responds

    27 Nov 2014 | 4:20 pm
    Recently, the NFL has become embroiled in high profile cases of domestic violence by its players (most notably, Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson). Many critics demand that the league suspend or otherwise discipline the guilty parties. But why, in general, should an employer be expected to address bad actions by its employees when those actions fall outside the scope of work-related duties? What business is it of my employer's whether I commit crimes when I leave work? Response from: Oliver Leaman I suppose the argument is that anyone who might serve as a role model for young people has to abide…
  • Question about Philosophy - Andrew Pessin responds

    27 Nov 2014 | 7:37 am
    People trying to defend philosophy often point out that the natural sciences ("natural philosophy") grew out of it. Does that really recommend philosophy, or does it just mean that we use the word "philosophy" much differently now than in Newton's time? Is it at all likely that philosophy as it is practiced today will result in the creation of significant new disciplines? Response from: Andrew Pessin nice question! hard to predict of course ... but some might say that psychology and now cognitive science have partly grown out of 'philosophy' fairly recently ... and some would argue that…
  • Question about Ethics, Value - Andrew Pessin responds

    27 Nov 2014 | 7:34 am
    I just watched the movie "Interstellar," in which the heroes try to begin a colony on another planet in order that the human race survive. Is there any compelling reason to do something like this? To be clear, as far as the heroes know, everyone who is currently alive on earth will die. The point is not to save those people, but only to see that there are future generations of humans that live after them. I can see that we have reasons to save actual, living people--they're capable of suffering, they have various interests, and so on--but those reasons don't apply to the hypothetical…
  • Question about Ethics, Value - Andrew Pessin responds

    27 Nov 2014 | 7:34 am
    I just watched the movie "Interstellar," in which the heroes try to begin a colony on another planet in order that the human race survive. Is there any compelling reason to do something like this? To be clear, as far as the heroes know, everyone who is currently alive on earth will die. The point is not to save those people, but only to see that there are future generations of humans that live after them. I can see that we have reasons to save actual, living people--they're capable of suffering, they have various interests, and so on--but those reasons don't apply to the hypothetical…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ethics Etc

  • CFP: 3rd Annual Workshop for Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy

    S. Matthew Liao
    28 Nov 2014 | 11:28 am
    Date: September 18th-20th, 2015 Location: Syracuse University A selection of the papers presented at the workshop will be published by Oxford University Press in a new series Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy, which will be edited by David Sobel, Peter Vallentyne and Steven Wall. There will be nine speakers including: • Elizabeth Anderson (Keynote), University […]
  • CFP: Virtue and Emotions

    S. Matthew Liao
    28 Nov 2014 | 11:20 am
    Guest Editor: Kevin Timpe (Northwest Nazarene University) Deadline for Submission: February 1, 2015 Prize: $3,000 Call for Papers Res Philosophica invites papers on the topic of virtue and the emotions for the 2015 Res Philosophica Essay Prize. The author of the winning paper will receive a prize of $3,000 and publication in the associated special […]
  • JOB: Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow in Environmental Studies and Bioethics at NYU

    S. Matthew Liao
    18 Nov 2014 | 11:03 am
    The NYU Department of Environmental Studies and the NYU Center for Bioethics invite applications for the position of Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow. The initial appointment will be for one year beginning September 1, 2015, renewable annually for a maximum of three years, pending administrative and budgetary approval. We especially welcome candidates who have worked in environmental […]
  • CFP: 18th Annual CUNY Graduate Student Conference

    S. Matthew Liao
    2 Nov 2014 | 12:32 pm
    ** I’m very honored to be invited to speak at this event. ** “Normativity and the Human Sciences” April 24th and 25th, 2015 Department of Philosophy, The Graduate Center, CUNY (New York, NY) Keynote Speakers: Tyler Burge (UCLA) and S. Matthew Liao (NYU) Deadline for Submissions: January 15th, 2015 Responses to submissions will be sent […]
  • CFP: Northwestern University Society for the Theory of Ethics and Politics 2015

    S. Matthew Liao
    2 Nov 2014 | 12:02 pm
    May 21-23, 2015 Keynote Addresses: Frances Kamm (Harvard University) Joseph Raz (Columbia University Law School) Submission Guidelines: Submissions from faculty and graduate students are welcomed, as some sessions will be reserved for student presentations. Please submit an essay of approximately 4000 words. Essay topics in all areas of ethical theory and political philosophy will be […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Feminist Philosophers

  • A case for state-school only Oxbridge colleges

    kaitijai
    28 Nov 2014 | 7:28 am
    Philosopher Lorna Finlayson argues in this Guardian article that Oxford and Cambridge should establish colleges that only admit state-school pupils, who are woefully under-represented at these universities. The main thrust of her argument is that all of the considerations in favour of colleges exclusively for women (of which Cambridge, for example, has three) also apply to the case of state-educated pupils. Well worth a read!
  • RIP: PD James

    annejjacobson
    27 Nov 2014 | 1:53 pm
    I well remember the delight of her early novels that featured Cordela Grey, a character who might have been one of one’s friends. Could there be any Western reader who likes mystery stories and doesn’t know her work? (No doubt a naive question.) From the NY Times: Ms. James was one of those rare authors whose work stood up to the inevitable and usually invidious comparisons with classic authors of the detective genre, like Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers and Margery Allingham. A consummate stylist, she accumulated numerous awards for the 13 crime novels produced during a…
  • Philosophical issues about Gender Schema

    annejjacobson
    25 Nov 2014 | 1:08 pm
    We have had a request for biblio resources for a student.  She has done some experimental work on gender schema and is now some more theoretical resources dealing with gender schema. I sent her three suggestions (see below).  The second is very recent and contains interesting thoughts on inferences that vary with stereotypes.  It’s by Susanna Siegel.  The third may look more applied than she wants, but as I remember it contains enlightening work on self-assessment, motivations and stereotypes. In any case, she’s like some more suggestions!! 1. Bias project at Univ of…
  • Ferguson: Demand Justice

    Jender
    25 Nov 2014 | 10:10 am
    Today, a St. Louis Grand Jury refused to indict Mike Brown’s killer — Police Officer Darren Wilson. On August 9th, the nation was horrified to learn that Mike Brown, an unarmed Black teenager, was targeted and killed by police as he walked down the street with a friend. Now, Mike’s killer may never be held accountable — unless President Barack Obama and US Attorney General Eric Holder take action. The Department of Justice is investigating Mike Brown’s death and has the power and responsibility to arrest and prosecute Officer Wilson under federal criminal charges. Go here.
  • In Praise of Damns

    Prof Manners
    25 Nov 2014 | 7:23 am
    Dear Professor Manners, Some days the state of the profession gets me down. I know it’s Live Like a Stoic Week, but I just can’t seem to get my apatheia on, especially when I read the blogs. Sincerely, Philosophus Feministus (who doesn’t know Latin and it’s a shame since that might help with the whole Stoic thing) Dear Philosophus Feministus, Alas, the profession does too often resemble a Roman spectacle. One goes to the blogs, as Seneca might say, in quest of “some fun, wit, and relaxation” only to find “pure murder” (in the strictly figurative bloggy sense only of…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    In Socrates' Wake

  • Diagnosing and treating students at risk of doing badly in logic: a request.

    Harry Brighouse
    21 Nov 2014 | 1:28 pm
    My friend Tony Laden, who is chair at University of Illinois, Chicago, requested that I pass on the request below. It's something that I imagine most Philosophy departments have to deal with, and I hope some have useful resources: if so, this would be a good place to provide them. Here's the request:Our department is looking for ways to help the large number of our students who struggle every term in introductory logic (failing to receive a C or better, and thus failing to satisfy the College’s quantitative reasoning requirement).  We have secured funding for an extra TA line to run…
  • Specs grading?

    Michael Cholbi
    19 Nov 2014 | 12:54 pm
    Curious to know if anyone out there has experimented with what Linda Nilson is calling "specs grading"? It seems to be a combination of mastery grading, a pass-fail only system, and grading that reflects accumulated knowledge. I'm intrigued and would be interested to hear directly about instructor experiences with this.
  • Why undergrad teaching is not a "necessary evil"

    Michael Cholbi
    10 Nov 2014 | 6:19 am
    Over at Philosophers' Cocoon, Marcus Arvan expounds on how we should see undergraduate teaching as something more than a "necessary evil" we tolerate in order to engage in philosophical research. (How come no one ever says we tolerate undergrad teaching in order to do university service?!)Marcus observes that teaching demands that we set aside jargon and get back to intellectual basics. This forces us to grasp, in a non-technical and intuitive way, what's appealing and unappealing about a philosophical position or claim: when teaching Kant's moral/practical philosophy, it's really easy…
  • UPDATE: Graphic on history of philosophy

    Michael Cholbi
    4 Nov 2014 | 2:30 pm
    UPDATE, Nov 4: Cook has created a second graphic depicting the history of Eastern philosophy.Merrill Cook has created this very attractive graphic charting the history of philosophy. Do feel free to display and disseminate.
  • New issue of Teaching Philosophy

    Michael Cholbi
    30 Oct 2014 | 3:45 pm
    The latest issue of Teaching Philosophy (volume 37, no. 4) is out. Detailed contents below the fold. Patricia CaltonTeaching Business Ethics as Innovative Problem SolvingTeaching business ethics offers an opportunity to encourage students to use ethical theory to develop critical thinking skills and to use these skills to practice creative, ethical problem solving that will serve them well in the course of their professional lives. In the first part of this article, I detail how the disciplined use of ethical theory not only develops students’ moral perceptions but also gives them the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Philosophy by the Way

  • Passages (3)

    23 Nov 2014 | 4:32 pm
    Self-made passagePassages in the sense of non-places as I have discussed them in my last blogs are a modern phenomenon. In pre-modern times they hardly existed, if they existed at all. The reason is that they do not come into being in a natural way as a consequence of the daily contacts of men with each other but they are planned. Passages are consciously made in order to deal with the growing number of people that want to do the same thing and in order to steer people gently where the planners want to have them and in the way the planners have determined. That’s why passages are a typical…
  • Passages (2)

    16 Nov 2014 | 3:38 pm
    In my last blog I talked about passages. Marc Augé, who has written an analysis of such places, calls them “non-lieux” – non-places, which expresses even better what they are: places that are nothing for you. You are just there because you cannot avoid them. You simply have to pass through them for one reason or another. And if you could avoid them, like the shops on an airfield, you are there because you have to fill your time anyway, be it by shopping or be it by waiting in the room near the gate till your airplane departs.According to Augé, non-places have three characteristics.
  • Passages

    9 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    It’s a kind of places that every traveller knows. Also when you are not travelling, you’ll certainly often have gone through them: passages. You cannot avoid them, although you would rather stay there as short as possible for passages are usually annoying and boring and sometimes even lugubrious. It does not need to be so, however, and some are even pleasant in a way. Passages connect places that are meaningful for you. You leave home and go to your work. Then you have to travel before you are there, so you spend some time in the bus or tram or train and at a bus stop or tram stop or in a…
  • “Do like the others and become yourself”

    2 Nov 2014 | 4:24 pm
    Everybody is unique or so he or she thinks. In view of this it is a bit strange that we want to be like the others who are in our reference groups, or at least that we don’t want to be too different from them. A recent study has shown again that just the marginal members of a group stress that they belong to it while the more central group members – who are known as such –  don’t feel the need to do so. This is especially the case if the group one wants to belong to has a higher status or cultural value, for then it enhances your self-esteem and your prestige. The case just…
  • “All things have their season” (2)

    25 Oct 2014 | 6:33 pm
    Once I decided to grow apples. So I read about how to cultivate them, about what is important when choosing apple varieties and a few things more. When I knew everything about growing apples and had chosen the varieties I wanted to have, I went to a fruit tree nursery and bought three young trees and planted them in my garden. It was a feast for the eye to see them growing and I liked it very much to look after them and to prune them. Since my garden is small, I trained the trees as espaliers. So I was very happy that after a few years I could eat fruit from my own garden. I had chosen the…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Brooks Blog

  • Testing Citizens: Why the UK Citizenship Test Requires Urgent Reforms

    17 Nov 2014 | 3:34 pm
    . . . is my new piece for Bright Blue and FOUND HERE.
  • Next talk: the Ethics, Politics, and Health Symposium, part of the President of Ireland’s Ethics Initiative

    13 Nov 2014 | 2:00 pm
    . . . and taking place at the University of Limerick. Details here for looks like a great event!
  • Ancient Republics: A Workshop (Part I)

    12 Nov 2014 | 12:24 pm
    In collaboration with the Centre for the Study of the Ancient Mediterranean and Near East (CAMNE), the Department of Classics and Ancient History at Durham University is hosting a workshop on Ancient Republics (14-15 November 2014), with the project of investigating the 'Republic' in its many manifestations in the ancient world, and its significance for later theories of Republican thought.  This project represents a collaboration between the Department of Classics and Ancient History at Durham University, the Department of Classics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the…
  • The facts about immigration & Labour's policies

    10 Nov 2014 | 3:53 am
    The FACTS about immigration and Labour's policies to deal with this... View this email in your browser SHADOW HOME SECRETARY IMMIGRATION In a week in which the Shadow Home Secretary will visit Basildon to discuss immigration with local residents, I think it is important that we set the record straight over UKIP's misleading statistics and inform people of Labour's policies for government. UKIP claim they are 'straight talking'. They plaster the phrase all over their leaflets. They think if they talk louder than everyone else and do it with a pint in one hand and a fag in the other, the public…
  • Dudley Knowles (1947-2014)

    9 Nov 2014 | 3:01 pm
    Dudley Knowles was Professor of Philosophy at the University of Glasgow.The Daily Nous has links to announcements here.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Jon Cogburn's Blog

  • Paul Thorn - I Don't Like Half the Folks I Love

    Jon Cogburn
    26 Nov 2014 | 5:52 pm
    A perfect song for everyone in the biz who tomorrow will just be trying to eat too much food in peace. Don't do anything to provoke the Fox News viewer one seat over who thinks that college professors are both symptom and cause of the moral rot hollowing out our once great nation. Respond to provocation gracefully. If Fox News viewers had been around in the olden times, surely Jesus would have included them (as well as philosophy majors!) with prostitutes and tax collectors in the class of people one ought to break bread with.
  • Robert Burns - The Selkirk Grace

    Jon Cogburn
    26 Nov 2014 | 3:41 pm
    Some hae meat and canna eat,    And some wad eat that want it; But we hae meat, and we can eat,    Sae let the Lord be thankit.
  • Betsy Woodruff speaks truth to power

    Jon Cogburn
    26 Nov 2014 | 10:57 am
    Why does the one holiday Americans devote entirely to eating involve such lackluster food? You really have to stretch (mackerel?) to find a protein less impressive than turkey. "Dressing" looks exactly the same before your drunk uncle has eaten it and after he's thrown it up the next morning. Boiled green beans taste like dirty water, and Jello brand cranberry mold is about the only thing I can imagine that pairs appropriately with the aforementioned vomitous dressing. Slate's Betsy Woodruff hits all these notes and more in this powerful set of reflections. We're finite…
  • Why do philosophy professors feel like they have to share their opinion about everything under the sun?

    Jon Cogburn
    25 Nov 2014 | 5:12 pm
    One of the most morally destructive things about philosophy is that study of it leads people to think that their opinions about anything under the sun are somehow a priori informed and interesting. This is probably because of the generality of the big P philosophical questions. Just what the heck is knowledge?  Matter? Possibility? etc. etc. etc. This is actually a lot like a classic scene from Bukowski's Factotum, where the boss is grilling Henry Chinanski about what his novel is about, and Chinanski keeps replying "everything." The boss then lists a set of objects that…
  • And I thought philosophers were nasty (hat-tip anonymous pmmb lurker)

    Jon Cogburn
    24 Nov 2014 | 3:37 pm
    As evidenced in this Modern Philology review, Miguel Tamen did not like Eric Hayt's Literary Worlds. I'm deeply conflicted about this kind of thing. On the one hand, reviewerly vitriol is tremendously entertaining when done well. And it certainly is here. Tamen's comments on Hayt's discussion of Jameson's discussion of "a certain Van Gogh painting" is hilarious, as is the bit about people at my career stage complaining about kids today, which I'll repeat here: Eric Hayot believes that “institutional problems require institutional solutions” (161). The…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Continental Philosophy

  • Foucault, Subjectivity and Truth – A Lecture by Stuart Elden

    James Luchte
    17 Nov 2014 | 1:03 pm
    Foucault, Subjectivity and Truth – A Lecture by Stuart Elden
  • Foucault’s Risks – by Anna Shechtman, Peter Raccuglia & Susan Morrow – Review – Los Angeles Review of Books

    James Luchte
    17 Nov 2014 | 12:56 pm
    Editor’s note: On October 17–18, 2014, Yale University hosted a conference exploring the intellectual and political legacy of Michel Foucault. The Los Angeles Review of Books asked three Yale graduate students to respond to this conference by focusing on what Foucault means for them, as scholars and theorists beginning their careers. WHEN JUDITH BUTLER came to Yale this month to speak at a conference on “Michel Foucault: After 1984,” she brought the police with her. Students and faculty packed the auditorium to see her, lining the walls and even the stage on which she spoke. If the…
  • Conference Session on Autonomy and Bolivia

    James Luchte
    17 Nov 2014 | 11:12 am
    Society for Latin American Studies conference, Aberdeen, UK – Call for papers (Deadline: 28 November 2014) Session title: Autonomies as radical decentralisation? Lessons from Bolivia Organisers: Philipp Horn (University of Manchester), Jessica Hope (University of Manchester), Rachel Godfrey Wood (IDS, Sussex), Pedro Pachaguaya (ADA La Paz, Bolivia)   This panel explores the limits and contours of autonomy, using Bolivia as a case-study. It seeks to engender cross disciplinary debate on entanglements between autonomy, identity, rights, nature and radical counter-hegemonic politics.
  • On Fantasy Island: British Politics, English Judges and the European Convention on Human Rights

    James Luchte
    9 Nov 2014 | 4:00 pm
    On Fantasy Island: British politics, English judges and the European Convention on Human Rights   On Fantasy Island: British Politics, English Judges and the European Convention on Human Rights Page Contents > Podcasts Twitter and Facebook CPD Accessibility WIFI Access LSE Law and The Wyndham Trust Corbishley Lecture Date: Thursday 6 November 2014 Time: 6.30-8pm Venue: Old Theatre, Old Building Speaker: Professor Conor Gearty Chair: Keith Best Conor Gearty unpicks the myths, illusions and downright lies that infect political engagement with human rights in Britain – and…
  • A Rupture in Colonial Reason: Spivak, Fanon, and The Question of Subalternity

    James Luchte
    5 Nov 2014 | 6:30 pm
    This is an account of the ACLA conference in NYC in the Spring of 2014     I. Memories of a Spivakian Given her revisions in A Critique of Postcolonial Reason, Spivak delineates three main point regarding the subaltern. First, the subaltern refers to the space of “sheer heterogeneity of” decolonization. Second, “when a line of communication is established between a member of a subaltern groups and the circuits of citizenships…this is absolutely desired.” This is to say, we should not valorize the condition of the subaltern unless, as Spivak writes, “we want to be…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    In Living Color

  • Bedtime Stories

    12 Nov 2014 | 1:58 pm
    Harry Brighouse and Adam Swift ask an interesting question about conferring advantage on children in their new book Family Values.  We do all sorts of things that confer advantage, from reading kids bedtime stories to sending them to private schools.  All these things get in the way of fair equality of opportunity, they say, giving children a leg up just because they happen to be born into
  • Well-Being

    3 Nov 2014 | 9:44 am
    My review of Well-Being: Happiness in a Worthwhile Life, by Neera K. Badhwar, is at Notre Dame Philosophy Reviews. 
  • Prague Restaurants and the Duties of Adult Children

    3 Nov 2014 | 9:42 am
    So we were in Prague last summer and discovered this thing called a "table charge."  I'm not really sure exactly what it is, but here's one possibility--the table charge is for stuff that's standardly put on the table--bread, water, a spot of liqueur after the meal.  I thought it was pretty annoying, because I wasn't given a choice whether to order that stuff or not. The prices on the menu
  • Sending affluence, receiving pestilence

    20 Oct 2014 | 8:31 am
    Peter Singer makes a very persuasive case that we ought to spend money to alleviate extreme poverty rather than buying the latest luxuries   But what if what is needed is not sending away our affluence but letting in disease?  Allowing travel to and from west Africa might increase the number of cases of Ebola in the US and slow the epidemic there;  closing borders could both protect us here and
  • Harvard's Sexual Misconduct Policy

    17 Oct 2014 | 8:29 am
    Harvard has a new and more victim-friendly sexual misconduct policy as of this fall, and 28 professors in the law school have complained about it (out of a total of 110).  It sounds to me as if they have some legitimate worries but I'm puzzled by one of the complaints. The faculty members, including emeritus professor Alan Dershowitz, said the policy should be retracted because it denies the
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    gonepublic: philosophy, politics, & public life

  • My Hall of Shame

    Noelle McAfee
    21 Nov 2014 | 3:29 pm
    Two days ago I got a couple of emails from a distant relative, so distant i had never heard of her, let alone met her. She wrote to tell me the good news of her genealogical discoveries of my father’s lineage, the McAfee clan. My generational Grandfather, Alfred Burton III was the individual who kept our family history in tact, within my line,  and I, as a young child adored him, his preservation of our history, and the many old stories which he shared.   I have tried to carry on our historical family history all or my adult years.  Today, it is through a feeling of obligation and…
  • More on how the PGR is toast

    Noelle McAfee
    2 Nov 2014 | 7:10 pm
    I would genuinely like to know how the Philosophical Gourmet Report evaluators were selected, how many were asked, what percentage they are of the entire philosophy faculty, how representative they are of the faculty overall, and how many have declined to participate this time given all the negative publicity. But I don’t expect much information.  And many others are seeing this too. Another reason to think that the PGR is toast. Lots more info here.
  • So just how much do you want to study philosophy?

    Noelle McAfee
    17 Oct 2014 | 4:29 pm
    Hannah Arendt to Mary McCarthy, August 20, 1954 At the moment, translating the old book [The Origins of Totalitarianism] into German, I am unhappy and impatient to get back to what I really want to do [likely her reflections on labor, work, and action]—if I can do it. But that is minor, I mean whether or not I am capable of doing what I want to do. Heinrich [Blücher] has a wonderful advice to give to his students when they talk about studying philosophy: he tells them you can do it only if you know that the most important thing in your life would be to succeed in this and the second most…
  • Infograph on the History of Philosophy

    Noelle McAfee
    2 Oct 2014 | 11:20 am
    This cool infographic was created by Merrill Cook and posted on superscholar.org. But, umm, couldn’t we get some of the women in the picture? Check out Kate Lindemann’s page for a good helping of that. Source: SuperScholar.org/
  • Documenting the meltdown on Leiter and bad tactics in rankings

    Noelle McAfee
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:12 pm
    If you are a philosopher in the English speaking world, you no doubt know that the old self-appointed emperor has lost his clothes. As of this writing, more than 520 philosophers (including the original signatories at the top) have signed a statement that they will decline to support his Philosophical Gourmet Report so long as he’s running it.  Twenty-four members of his board have asked him to relinquish management. Since I’ve been one of the characters in this tale, I’ve been keeping up with all the talk in the philosophy blogosphere.  For those interested in…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Alexander Pruss's Blog

  • Simplicity, language-independence and laws

    25 Nov 2014 | 11:10 am
    One measure of the simplicity of a proposition is the length of the shortest sentence expressing the proposition. Unfortunately, this measure is badly dependent on the choice of language. Normally, we think of the proposed law of nature F=Gmm'/r2 as simpler than: F=Gmm'/r2.000000000000000000000000000000000000001, but if my language has a name "H" for the number in the exponent, then the second law is as brief as the first: F=Gmm'/rH. One common move is to employ theorems to the effect that given some assumptions, measures of simplicity using different languages are going to be asymptotically…
  • Simplicity, language and design

    24 Nov 2014 | 10:13 am
    Simplicity is best understood linguistically (e.g., brevity of expression in the right kind of language). Simplicity is a successful (though fallible) guide to truth. If (1) and (2), then probably the universe was made for language users or by a language user. If the universe was made for language users, it was made by an intelligent being. If the universe was made by a language user, it was made by an intelligent being. So, probably, the universe was made by an intelligent being.
  • A moral argument

    21 Nov 2014 | 6:32 am
    I've never found the moral argument for morality—except in its epistemic variety—particularly compelling. But now I find myself pulled to find plausible premises (1) and (2) of the following pretty standard argument: Only things that are infinitely more important than me can ultimately ground absolutely overriding rules on me. Rules without ultimate grounding are impossible or not absolutely overriding. I am a finite person. The only things that could be infinitely more important than a finite person are or have among them (a) infinitely many finite persons or (b) an infinite person.
  • Possibility, Aristotelian propositions and an open future

    14 Nov 2014 | 8:50 am
    Aristotelians think that tensed sentences like "It is sunny" expressed "tensed propositions" capable of changing in truth value between true and false as the facts alter. The proposition that it is sunny is false today but was true two days ago. Anti-Aristotelians, on the other hand, roughly say that the sentence "It is sunny" expresses the proposition that it is sunny at t0, where t0 is the time of utterance, a proposition whose truth value does not vary between true and false as the facts alter. Most presentists are Aristotelians about propositions, and most open futurists these days seem…
  • Freedom and theodicy

    13 Nov 2014 | 6:48 am
    Invoking free will has always been a major part of theodicy. If God has good reason to give us the possibility to act badly, that provides us with at least a defense against the problem of evil. But to make this defense into something more like a theodicy is hard. After all, God can give us such pure characters that even though we can act badly, we are unlikely to do so. I want to propose that we go beyond the mere alternate-possibilities part of free will in giving theodicies. The main advantage of this is that the theodicy may be capable of accomplishing more. But there is also a very nice…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Splintered Mind

  • More Philosophical SF Recommendations

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    24 Nov 2014 | 4:28 pm
    Regular readers of The Splintered Mind will remember the recent series of posts offering 36 professional philosophers' recommendations of works of science fiction or speculative fiction (SF) -- compiled here. Since then, I've accumulated a few more lists and recommendations. Here's a list of movies from the Philo-Teach discussion list started in 1996, which Bruce Janz has kindly reposted -- movies that philosophers have found useful to show students for teaching purposes. Some good SF on there (but also lots of non-SF). And here's a list of science fiction about death compiled for John M.
  • Schindler's Truck

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    19 Nov 2014 | 2:15 pm
    Today I'm thinking about Schindler's truck and what it suggests about the moral psychology of one of the great heroes of the Holocaust. Here's a portrayal of the truck, in the background of a famous scene from Schindler's List: [image source] Oskar Schindler, as you probably know, saved over a thousand Jews from death under the Nazis by spending vast sums of money to hire them in his factories, where they were protected. Near the end of Spielberg's movie about him, the script suggests that Schindler is broke -- that he has spent the last of his wartime slave-labor profits to save his Jewish…
  • My Reaction to David Chalmers's The Conscious Mind, 18 Years Later

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    10 Nov 2014 | 8:35 pm
    The Chronicle of Higher Education asked me what book written in the last 30 years changed my mind. Instead of trying to be clever, I went with my somewhat boring best guess at the truth: David Chalmers's The Conscious Mind. It changed my mind not because I came to accept its conclusions, but rather because Chalmers so nicely shows that if you want to avoid the bizarreness of panpsychism, epiphenomenalism, and property dualism, you have to say something else that seems at least equally bizarre. I differ from Chalmers in lacking confidence that I have good basis for choosing among the various…
  • Two Views of the Relationship Between Philosophy and Science Fiction

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    10 Nov 2014 | 9:38 am
    Consider two possible views of the relationship between philosophy and science fiction. On the first view, science fiction simply illustrates, or makes more accessible, what could be said as well or better in a discursive philosophical essay. Those who can’t stomach purely abstract discussions on the nature of time, for example, might be drawn into an exciting story; but seasoned philosophers can ignore such entertainments and proceed directly to the abstract arguments that are the meat of the philosophical enterprise. On the second view, science-fictional storytelling has philosophical…
  • Philosophical SF: Thirty-Six Philosophers' Recommendations

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    3 Nov 2014 | 2:24 pm
    ... here!This mega-list of about 360 recommendations is compiled from the lists I've been rolling out over the past several weeks. Thirty-four professional philosophers and two prominent science fiction / speculative fiction (SF) authors with graduate training in philosophy each contributed a list of ten personal favorite "philosophically interesting" SF works, with brief "pitches" for each recommended work.I have compiled two mega-lists, organized differently. One mega-list is organized by contributor, so that you can see all of Scott Bakker's recommendations, then all of Sara Bernstein's…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    In the Space of Reasons

  • Pro-social behaviour

    20 Nov 2014 | 1:17 pm
    One of the presentations I heard at a graduate psychology conference at Durham this week (to which I had been generously invited to give the closing lecture) concerned an investigation of the factors that encourage pro-social (the antonym of anti-social) behaviour in some example universities. The potential impact of the research was that it might indicate how to make universities better but in particular more harmonious places especially important in the light of the rise of tuition fees in the UK and the need for high student satisfaction scores.One stage of the research concerned self…
  • Call for papers: moral and legal responsibility in the age of neuroscience

    20 Nov 2014 | 2:37 am
    CALL FOR PAPERS THIRD UK CONFERENCE IN PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHIATRY ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS21 PRESCOT STREET LONDON E1 8BB23-25 SEPTEMBER 2015MORAL AND LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY IN THE AGE OF NEUROSCIENCE The focus of this conference will be moral and legal responsibility in people who have been diagnosed with mental disorders. This is an exciting area in which recent developments in policy and research are casting a new light on old problems.The conference is not confined to psychiatrists and is open to anyone with an academic, professional or personal interest in this area. We hope to…
  • Psychiatric diagnosis, tacit knowledge and criteria

    18 Nov 2014 | 6:28 am
    A third draft paper written whilst a fellow of the Institute for Advanced Study, University of DurhamIntroductionFor the last 50 years, both of the major psychiatric diagnostic systems – DSM and ICD – have aimed at reliability at the potential, at least, cost of validity. They have done this by codifying diagnosis in the form of criteria, influenced by operationalism from the philosophy of physics and down playing potentially false aetiological theory. It is an empirical question whether, overall, DSM-III, -IV and now -5 and the parallel ICD classifications have achieved this aim…
  • On the therapeutic status of McDowell's representationalism

    14 Nov 2014 | 12:51 am
    I gave a talk in the Durham Philosophy Deportment which could, I realise in retrospect, have been significantly simplified. The key point, really, was that the move from the representationalism (by which I mean a view of experience as itself a content-laden state) of Mind and World to that of 'Avoiding the myth of the given' and after involved key changes which, rather than merely a matter of degree, change the point and nature of the account.In the earlier picture, both a partial respect for the coherentism in Davidson's slogan that nothing can count as a reason for a belief except another…
  • Why 'In the Space of Reasons'?

    6 Nov 2014 | 5:02 am
    In response to a question from someone reading philosophy but not a philosopher (better: a poet).The phrase comes from a paper (now published as a short book) called ‘Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind’ by Wilfrid Sellars, the mid C20 American philosopher. One question he addresses is whether knowledge has a foundation. His answer is that it does, it can be grounded in perceptual reports, but that these do not have a property sometimes expected of epistemic foundations: that they can be made independently of holistic considerations. They are not brute data in that sense. That, he…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Freemason Information

  • The Portale Panel by Brother Ryan J. Flynn

    Fred Milliken
    17 Nov 2014 | 6:59 am
    Masonic artist Brother Ryan J. Flynn has his latest work completed, THE PORTALE PANEL – an Entered Apprentice Tracing Board. He describes this beautiful piece of art as follows: Brethren, Ladies and gentlemen, I am pleased to present to you my very first Tracing Board.  The Portale Panel Egg Tempera on Wood; Gold Leaf and Wood Stained Wooden Frame 24in x 36in Center panel. entire work 40 in 52in;       You can catch Brother Flynn and all his works on his artist Facebook Page – https://www.facebook.com/RyanJFlynnArtist Or on his website…
  • All Hallows’ Eve as a Hermetic Holiday

    Greg Stewart
    26 Oct 2014 | 9:22 am
    Little ground exists between Halloween and Freemasonry. Here and there a costume ball or an orange crepe paper centerpiece marks the passing of the season, but that is probably the extent of any connectivity. For me, the holiday has always been an important one even as my own little goblins have forsaken the quest for candy for more adult like pursuits. This is the first year of a house devoid of pint sized celebrants leaving me to reorient myself to the signs of the season. Few could argue that the air itself reminds us that it is autumn – it comes from the harvest; the slow…
  • WORKING FOR GOONS

    TimBryce
    17 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    BRYCE ON SOCIETY - Making the work environment unbearable. (Click for AUDIO VERSION)To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request. One of the reasons Scott Adams’ cartoon, “Dilbert,” is so successful is because it hits close to home in depicting office life. Corporate management is one of Adams’ favorite targets in which they are shown as bumbling idiots. They are very determined in controlling all activities of the business. Their approach is predictably wrong, and they embrace every management fad that comes along. Because of their strong…
  • Who is the better Mason?

    TimBryce
    2 Oct 2014 | 7:54 am
    BRYCE ON FREEMASONRY - The individual or a Lodge officer? I have been wrestling with a conundrum lately regarding Freemasonry: Who is the better Mason, the person who is properly initiated, passed and raised a Master Mason and disappears shortly thereafter, or the Mason who becomes an officer of the Lodge? Let me give you my spin on it. There may be many reasons why a Mason drops out of sight; first, his occupation may require him to work difficult hours or to cause him to move to another locale. As Americans, it is not uncommon for workers to move throughout the country. In my case, I have…
  • WHO HAS GOT YOUR BACK?

    TimBryce
    29 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    BRYCE ON BUSINESS - A lesson of loyalty in the workplace, and in life. (Click for AUDIO VERSION) To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request. In the office, we like to believe our fellow co-workers will back us up when push comes to shove. Actually, we’re being quite naive when this occurs. To illustrate, there was a systems manager in Chicago who had grown weary of the petty politics practiced by his boss, the I.T. Director. Projects were late, none of the systems were integrated, end-users were unhappy, and they found themselves in a constant fire-fighting…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Philosophy News

  • Question about Ethics, Love - Allen Stairs responds

    28 Nov 2014 | 9:28 am
    I am in love with my brother's ex-girlfriend of 2 years. Over those 2 years, we became best friends and I developed feelings for her. My question is, now that my brother and her are no longer together, is MORALLY wrong to start a relationship with her? Here is what I have considered: From what I have learned about objective morality/ethics I could follow the Golden Rule "Treat other as you would want to be treated". I have dismissed this on the basis that yes, if I were my brother I would be annoyed by my brother dating my ex, but I would also want my brother to be happy and, after weighing…
  • Campus novels

    27 Nov 2014 | 5:14 pm
    Beyond Lucky Jim. Campus novels have evolved since Kingsley Amis. The genre has moved beyond jaded satire… more»Continue reading . . . News source: Arts & Letters Daily
  • On Dylan Thomas

    27 Nov 2014 | 5:13 pm
    “As useless as a fat child in a flood.” The worldly incompetence of Dylan Thomas was key to his boyish charm… more»Continue reading . . . News source: Arts & Letters Daily
  • The woman who shot Andy Warhol

    27 Nov 2014 | 5:13 pm
    The woman who shot Andy Warhol. A foul-mouthed lesbian who hated men, Valerie Solanas had a talent for self-destruction… more»Continue reading . . . News source: Arts & Letters Daily
  • Question about Business, Ethics - Oliver Leaman responds

    27 Nov 2014 | 4:42 pm
    Recently, the NFL has become embroiled in high profile cases of domestic violence by its players (most notably, Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson). Many critics demand that the league suspend or otherwise discipline the guilty parties. But why, in general, should an employer be expected to address bad actions by its employees when those actions fall outside the scope of work-related duties? What business is it of my employer's whether I commit crimes when I leave work? Response from: Oliver Leaman I suppose the argument is that anyone who might serve as a role model for young people has to abide…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Mindful Word

  • LANGUAGE AND THE LAND: A visit to the indigenous Sami people’s Norway

    editor-er
    25 Nov 2014 | 2:08 pm
    The sign at Karasjok’s border is simple: the town’s name written in white lettering on a blue background, with a bold black “i” on the […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • CALMENT: Participation in a virtual world

    Cindy McMann
    22 Nov 2014 | 1:31 pm
    Is there a way to engage in meaningful conversation about public life—politics, culture, economics, arts, whatever—online without having it all dissolve into hateful, unnecessarily intolerant […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • STILL, SMALL, SLOW TRAVEL: Flowing freely with whatever the road brings your way

    editor-er
    18 Nov 2014 | 2:10 pm
    Excerpted from New Slow City by William Powers, a memoir that this New York author has written based on his experience living a slow-paced life […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • BEYOND MINDFULNESS: How to cultivate awareness without detachment

    editor-er
    16 Nov 2014 | 6:27 am
    For many years I practiced mindfulness meditation as a Buddhist monk. For hours each day I paid careful attention to the coming and going of […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • PUT YOUR WHOLE SELF IN: Learning to be fully present, alive and awake at all times

    editor-er
    13 Nov 2014 | 1:32 pm
    Excerpt from When Did You Die? 8 Steps to Stop Dying Every Day and Start Waking Up by Temple Hayes, a how-to guide for those individuals looking […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    TheYoungSocrates

  • Violence against Public Servants: Should It be Punished Harder?

    Rob
    26 Nov 2014 | 6:47 am
    Should ambulance personnel receive extra protection from the state? Ambulance personnel, police officers and firemen: people that, day in and day out, prevent our society from turning into a complete chaos. They support us so that we can live our lives without having to worry about our human rights being infringed upon. But what if these servants themselves become infringed upon their basic human rights? What if they are violated, both mentally and physically? There are governments, including the Dutch one, that have made explicit their intention to punish violence against public servants…
  • What Is the Value of a Human Life?

    Rob
    26 Nov 2014 | 2:19 am
    People are getting older and older and demand better and better (medical) care. Also, advancements in technology and medical knowledge allow what once seemed to be incurable illnesses to be cured – or at least treated. These trends result in an ever increasing rise in the medical expenditures of countries. This begs the question: how far should we go in saving a patient’s life? What is the value of a human life? Should we be prepared to save someone at all costs? Or should we think about the financial consequences of our decisions? And if so, what is the (financial) limit? There are…
  • Religion and The Absurd

    Rob
    25 Nov 2014 | 7:45 am
    There are times at which I envy religious people. Their sense of determination, of knowing where all of this is about and what to do with it, can seem very alluring at times. Like it can really put your mind at ease. And why wouldn’t it? After all, religious people always know that, no matter what they are faced with in life, they will always be able to come up with an explanation that is 100 percent bulletproof. An explanation that always points to the one single source of everything. Down to God himself. That truly must be a peaceful mindset, right? Wrong. Reality contradicts this…
  • Why You Should Always Respect the Dustman

    Rob
    24 Nov 2014 | 7:15 am
    I have been a dustman for a while. And even though my stay in the ‘dustman-community”’ was short, I was long enough to become overwhelmed by the disrespect these people receive from their fellow species members. People are yelling things at them. People are telling them how shitty their job is. People treat them like the true pieces of garbage. I was wondering what the dustmen themselves were thinking about their profession. Were they also disgusted about what they were doing? I decided to ask them. And this is what they told me: they absolutely loved what they were doing. They…
  • How to Justify Consequentialism Without Pointing at the Consequences?

    Rob
    20 Nov 2014 | 1:21 am
    What makes an action good or bad? People adhering to deontological ethics judge the morality of their actions based on whether their actions follow certain rules. ‘You should not kill’, ‘You should not steal’ and ‘You should not lie’ are examples of such rules. On the other end there are people who say that ‘ the ends justify the means’, and that the rightness or wrongness of an action is ultimately based on the outcomes of the action. ‘You may lie if the damage caused to the person you lie to is negligible in comparison to the utility you…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Philosophers' Cocoon

  • 3QD Semifinalists

    Marcus Arvan
    26 Nov 2014 | 6:40 am
    I am happy to report that four Cocooners are among the semifinalists in this year's 3 Quarks Daily Philosophy Blogging Prize: Justin Caouette's, "Moral Responsibility and Volunteer Soldiers." Elisa Freschi's, "Veṅkaṭanātha’s contribution to Viśiṣṭādvaita Vedānta." Clayton Littlejohn's, "Introducing (and solving?) a puzzle about rationality." My, "The Case for Libertarian Compatibilism." Six finalists will be posted on December 1st. Good luck to everyone!
  • Why you should still (maybe) be a professor

    Marcus Arvan
    23 Nov 2014 | 9:45 am
    Over at Talking Philosophy, the blog associated with The Philosophers' Magazine, Mike LaBossiere has written a piece entitled, "Why You Should (Probably) Not Be a Professor." In brief, LaBossiere gives many of the standard warnings about the career (and life) risks involved in attempting an academic career: student debt, poor job prospects, low salaries, high workloads, etc. These are all good and important things to warn people about. Given the risks, one should be very careful about attempting a career in academic. One should enter into it with eyes wide open, knowing the…
  • What can my grandmother know about Mary?

    Helen De Cruz
    22 Nov 2014 | 8:38 pm
    In What can she know Lorraine Code argues for a feminist epistemology, in which our situation, community, position in society, matter to what we can know. Knowledge mainly available to men is implicitly regarded as gender-neutral; meanwhile knowledge traditionally associated with women is regarded as not knowledge at all. Consider the practices of some Catholic Latina women in the United States, who fend off the evil eye (especially of infants) with eggs, bury statues of saints like Mary and Joseph in their front yard when the saints refuse to grant requests, and dig them up again once the…
  • Participation for a survey on religious disagreement

    Helen De Cruz
    21 Nov 2014 | 9:32 am
    What do philosophers think about religious disagreement? This is a brief survey (takes about 5-10 minutes) to find this out. The survey is aimed at academic philosophers, by which I mean people who hold a PhD in philosophy or are graduate students in philosophy. If you fit these criteria, please consider participating. Participation is fully anonymous. The format of the study is a multiple choice questionnaire. I will ask some personal questions, amongst others about your religious views, but your name will not be asked. To further take care that your anonymity is preserved, I will not report…
  • Some notes on the Extended Narrativity Hypothesis

    David Killoren
    20 Nov 2014 | 12:29 pm
    Intuitively, we have certain important moral obligations toward our animal companions, a.k.a. pets. To begin with, we ought to keep them safe from harm. We also ought to provide them with certain goods: food, recreation, social life, comfort, freedom to move around, and so on. And we don't kill them except in certain unusual cases (e.g., we might kill them in self-defense, or for their own good when they are very sick). Many of us believe that our moral relationship with our animal companions is similar to our moral relationship to our family members; indeed, many of us believe that our…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Your Motivation Guru

  • 10 Good Habits You Can Adopt This Thanksgiving Day

    kanz_85@yahoo.co.in
    25 Nov 2014 | 3:53 am
    10 Good Habits You Can Adopt This Thanksgiving Day   Habits are in fact mere models of behavior that impregnate over a period of time. Most of you may have heard about the 21-day or the 30-day rule in which if you repeat certain behavior, for example- drinking water, for the particular number of days, you’ll have made it a habit. No one knows the precise significance of these rules; however research suggests that if you do something rather often, it’ll become second nature. This Thanksgiving Day we must adopt these 10 new habits for personal growth and improvement. THANKSGIVING DAY…
  • Few Indicators You Should Quit Your Job Right Now

    kanz_85@yahoo.co.in
    20 Nov 2014 | 11:01 pm
    Few Indicators You Should Quit Your Job Right Now We all use an enormous part of our lives working. No one should stay in a job they despise. It’s one thing to seldom nag about your job. That’s common. But if you come across yourself irritable all the time, stressed out and short-tempered, then it’s time to get out. RIGHT NOW.!!! Indicator No.1# YOU WHINE ABOUT YOUR JOB ALL THE TIME It’s normal to complain about work once in a while. But if all you do is complain about your job to your family and friends, they’ll start tuning you out. If you’re doing it at…
  • Morning Routine of 5 Successful People That You Can Include In Your Mornings

    kanz_85@yahoo.co.in
    19 Nov 2014 | 9:32 pm
    Morning Routine of 5 Successful People That You Can Include In Your Mornings How do we start our mornings, what is our Morning Routine? For most of us morning starts with a quick look at the phone to check new posts, tweets or e-mails.for others it could be coffee, newspaper and so on. How we choose to start our day is, basically going to impact our whole day’s productivity. A good Morning Routine can give us a positive, unambiguous mindset, while a poor Morning Routine will pull us behind our targets all through the day. Here are Morning Routine’s of 5 Successful People that can help get…
  • How to Train Your Brain to Stay Focused – 8 Simple Ideas

    kanz_85@yahoo.co.in
    19 Nov 2014 | 12:26 pm
    How to Train Your Brain to Stay Focused   Learn how to train your brain to stay focused; it’ll serve as the key to achieve your goals. Your brain is directly connected to your subconscious. A focused brain has a focused subconscious which creates a center of attention to attract circumstances and opportunities towards you. I admit that the mind likes to wander, but we want it to return to the present moment—so we are able to focus on tasks at hand. No one can teach you how to train your brain, you have to do it yourself start by applying these techniques they will help you focus…
  • 5 Personality Traits That Will Get You Hired

    kanz_85@yahoo.co.in
    18 Nov 2014 | 5:17 am
    5 Personality Traits That Will Get You Hired Job interviews can be intimidating for any job seekers, many candidates apply for a job opening but only few get hired, getting hired is feasible only when you have an edge above the other candidates, when you have something unique to offer, something that makes you stand out and that something is your “PERSONALITY”. Personality is the key. However it is not something which easily reflects in an interview. Considering the candidates anxiety and nerves at the time of the interview – he may not be able to put his best foot forward in that…
Log in