Philosophy

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  • How In-Between Cases of Belief Differ Normatively from In-Between Cases of Extraversion

    The Splintered Mind
    Eric Schwitzgebel
    2 Jul 2015 | 12:40 pm
    For twenty years, I've been advocating a dispositional account of belief, according to which to believe that P is to match, to an appropriate degree and in appropriate respects, a "dispositional stereotype" characteristic of the belief that P. In other words: All there is to believing that P is being disposed, ceteris paribus (all else equal or normal or right), to act and react, internally and externally, like a stereotypical belief-that-P-er. Since the beginning, two concerns have continually nagged at me. One concern is the metaphysical relation between belief and outward behavior. It…
  • Moby Dick as Philosophy, Redux

    Leiter Reports: A Philosophy Blog
    Brian Leiter
    6 Jul 2015 | 5:06 am
    Philosopher Mark Anderson (Belmont) reports his entire blogged book is now on-line.
  • Attempted murder

    Alexander Pruss's Blog
    6 Jul 2015 | 12:31 pm
    Every wrong act is wrong because it wrongs someone or something. Say that an act is fundamentally self-wronging provided that it is wrong because it wrongs oneself. It's controversial whether there are fundamentally self-wronging acts, but I think there are. However, attempted murder (as long as it's not attempted suicide) is not a self-wronging act. But now imagine that Bob is the only contingent being in existence, and Bob attempts to murder someone else (of course, to do that he will presumably have to have a false belief that there is another contingent being). Bob commits attempted…
  • Feminist Perspectives on the Self

    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
    Cynthia Willett, Ellie Anderson, and Diana Meyers
    6 Jul 2015 | 4:59 pm
    [Revised entry by Cynthia Willett, Ellie Anderson, and Diana Meyers on July 6, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, bib.html] The topic of the self has long been salient in feminist philosophy, for it is pivotal to questions about personal identity, the body, sociality, and agency that feminism must address. Simone de Beauvoir's provocative declaration, "He is the Subject, he is the Absolute - she is the Other," signals the central importance of the self for feminism. To be the Other is to be the non-subject, the non-person, the non-agent - in short, the mere body. In law,...
  • Homosexuality

    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
    Brent Pickett
    5 Jul 2015 | 6:54 pm
    [Revised entry by Brent Pickett on July 5, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The term 'homosexuality' was coined in the late 19th century by a German psychologist, Karoly Maria Benkert. Although the term is new, discussions about sexuality in general, and same-sex attraction in particular, have occasioned philosophical discussion ranging from Plato's Symposium to contemporary queer theory. Since the history of cultural understandings of same-sex attraction is relevant to the philosophical issues raised by those...
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    Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

  • Natural Theology and Natural Religion

    Andrew Chignell and Derk Pereboom
    6 Jul 2015 | 9:00 pm
    [New Entry by Andrew Chignell and Derk Pereboom on July 6, 2015.] The term "natural religion" is sometimes taken to refer to a pantheistic doctrine according to which nature itself is divine. "Natural theology", by contrast, originally referred to (and still sometimes refers to)[1] the project of arguing for the existence of God on the basis of observed natural facts. In contemporary philosophy, however, both "natural...
  • Feminist Perspectives on the Self

    Cynthia Willett, Ellie Anderson, and Diana Meyers
    6 Jul 2015 | 4:59 pm
    [Revised entry by Cynthia Willett, Ellie Anderson, and Diana Meyers on July 6, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography, bib.html] The topic of the self has long been salient in feminist philosophy, for it is pivotal to questions about personal identity, the body, sociality, and agency that feminism must address. Simone de Beauvoir's provocative declaration, "He is the Subject, he is the Absolute - she is the Other," signals the central importance of the self for feminism. To be the Other is to be the non-subject, the non-person, the non-agent - in short, the mere body. In law,...
  • Homosexuality

    Brent Pickett
    5 Jul 2015 | 6:54 pm
    [Revised entry by Brent Pickett on July 5, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] The term 'homosexuality' was coined in the late 19th century by a German psychologist, Karoly Maria Benkert. Although the term is new, discussions about sexuality in general, and same-sex attraction in particular, have occasioned philosophical discussion ranging from Plato's Symposium to contemporary queer theory. Since the history of cultural understandings of same-sex attraction is relevant to the philosophical issues raised by those...
  • The Definition of Lying and Deception

    James Edwin Mahon
    1 Jul 2015 | 12:37 am
    [Revised entry by James Edwin Mahon on June 30, 2015. Changes to: Main text, Bibliography] Questions central to the philosophical discussion of lying to others and other-deception (interpersonal deceiving) may be divided into two kinds. Questions of the first kind are definitional (or conceptual). They include the questions of how lying is to be defined, how deceiving is to be defined, and whether lying is always a form of deceiving. Questions of the second kind are normative (more particularly, moral). They include the questions of whether lying and...
  • Heidegger's Aesthetics

    Iain Thomson
    27 Jun 2015 | 12:43 am
    [Revised entry by Iain Thomson on June 26, 2015. Changes to: Bibliography, notes.html] Heidegger is against the modern tradition of philosophical "aesthetics" because he is for the true "work of art" which, he argues, the aesthetic approach to art eclipses. Heidegger's critique of aesthetics and his advocacy of art thus form a complementary whole. Section 1 orients the reader by providing a brief overview of Heidegger's philosophical stand against aesthetics, for art. Section 2 explains...
 
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    Talking Philosophy

  • The Value of Public Universities

    Mike LaBossiere
    6 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com One stock narrative in the media is that the cost of attending college has skyrocketed. This is true. There is also a stock narrative that this increase, at least for public universities, has been due to the cutting of public education funds. This certainly is part of the truth. Another important part is the cost of sustaining the every-growing and well paid administrative class that has ensconced (and perhaps enthroned) itself at colleges and universities. I will, however, focus primarily on the cutting of public funds. The stock media narrative makes it clear…
  • Robot Love I: Other Minds

    Mike LaBossiere
    3 Jul 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com Thanks to improvements in medicine humans are living longer and can be kept alive well past the point at which they would naturally die. On the plus side, longer life is generally (but not always) good. On the downside, this longer lifespan and medical intervention mean that people will often need extensive care in their old age. This care can be a considerable burden on the caregivers. Not surprisingly, there has been an effort to develop a technological solution to this problem, specifically companion robots that serve as caregivers. While the technology is…
  • Does the Legalization of Same-Sex Marriage Infringe on Religious Liberty?

    Mike LaBossiere
    1 Jul 2015 | 9:58 am
    View image | gettyimages.com In June, 2015 the United States Supreme Court ruled in favor of the legality of same-sex marriage. Many states had already legalized same-sex marriages and a majority of Americans think it should be legal. As such, the ruling seems to be consistent both with the constitution and with the democratic ideal of majority rule. There are, of course, those who object to the ruling. Some claim that the court acted in a way contrary to the democratic rule by engaging in judicial activism. Not surprisingly, some of those who make this claim were fine when the court ruled in…
  • Is Libertarianism Viable?

    Mike LaBossiere
    29 Jun 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com The United States has had a libertarian and anarchist thread since the beginning, which is certainly appropriate for a nation that espouses individual liberty and expresses distrust of the state. While there are many versions of libertarianism and these range across the political spectrum, I will focus on one key aspect of libertarianism. To be specific, I will focus on the idea that the government should impose minimal limits on individual liberty and that there should be little, if any, state regulation of business. These principles were laid out fairly clearly…
  • The Implications of Self-Driving Cars

    Mike LaBossiere
    26 Jun 2015 | 5:00 am
    View image | gettyimages.com My friend Ron claims that “Mike does not drive.” This is not true—I do drive, but I do so as little as possible. Part of it is frugality—I don’t want to spend more than I need to on gas and maintenance. Most of it is that I hate to drive. Some of this is due to the fact that driving time is mostly wasted time—I would rather be doing something else. Most of it is that I find driving an awful blend of boredom and stress. As such, I am completely in favor of driverless cars and want Google to take my money. That said, it is certainly worth considering…
 
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    Ethics Etc

  • Pauer-Studer and Velleman’s new book on Konrad Morgen

    S. Matthew Liao
    20 Jun 2015 | 2:44 pm
    Professors Herlinde Pauer-Studer and David Velleman have recently published a new book called Konrad Morgen: The Conscience of a Nazi Judge. There is a good write-up of the book in Aeon, which you can read here. Do check them out!
  • Tune In to NYU Bioethics Workshop Live Broadcast!

    S. Matthew Liao
    21 May 2015 | 3:01 pm
    Final session now live: you can watch the live broadcast here: https://www.periscope.tv/w/V0IB7TI4MzI5MDV8MTM0Mzc4NDEHNGogIjSWdbLAyPT Wx3xJJonIYjTFw_v5TBqQ9UHO-w== Can’t travel to NYC for the NYU Workshop on Current Controversies in Bioethics? You will be able to tune in to a live broadcast of the workshop tomorrow at 1pm! Links to the broadcast will be posted on Twitter, Facebook, and here […]
  • Program for Current Controversies in Bioethics at NYU

    S. Matthew Liao
    20 May 2015 | 8:24 am
    Please find below the program for the NYU Center for Bioethics workshop on “Current Controversies in Bioethics.” Friday, May 22, 2015 NYU Silver Center, 1st Floor Jurow Hall, 100 Washington Square East, NY, NY 10003 1:00 PM-3:00 PM—Session 1 (Psychopathy, Autism, and Capacities for Responsible Agency) “An Exploration of Moral Competence through Autism, Psychopathy, and […]
  • Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights Now Out!

    S. Matthew Liao
    5 May 2015 | 6:09 pm
    Our book, Philosophical Foundations of Human Rights, which Rowan Cruft, Massimo Renzo, and I edited, just came out! You can get a copy in the UK from major outlets such as OUP UK and Amazon UK. In the US, you can get the Kindle and Nook versions now. The print version for the US market […]
  • Earth Week Podcast: Cat Eyes for Climate Change

    S. Matthew Liao
    20 Apr 2015 | 10:35 pm
    In celebration of Earth Week, readers of Ethics Etc might be interested in a podcast I did with The Adaptors called “Cat Eyes for Climate Change.” You can find the podcast here: http://www.theadaptors.org/episodes/2015/2/11/cat-eyes-for-climate-cha nge and on iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/cat-eyes-for-climate-change/id9608 40471?i=335303274&mt=2 You can also listen to it directly here:
 
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    Philosophical Review current issue

  • From Choice to Chance? Saving People, Fairness, and Lotteries

    Henning, T.
    15 Jun 2015 | 10:30 am
    Many authors in ethics, economics, and political science endorse the Lottery Requirement, that is, the following thesis: where different parties have equal moral claims to one indivisible good, it is morally obligatory to let a fair lottery decide which party is to receive the good. This article defends skepticism about the Lottery Requirement. It distinguishes three broad strategies of defending such a requirement: the surrogate satisfaction account, the procedural account, and the ideal consent account, and argues that none of these strategies succeed. The article then discusses and…
  • Reasons as Defaults

    Finlay, S.
    15 Jun 2015 | 10:30 am
  • Quantifying In from a Fregean Perspective

    Yalcin, S.
    15 Jun 2015 | 10:30 am
    As Quine (1956) observed, the following sentence has a reading which, if true, would be of special interest to the authorities:(1) Ralph believes that someone is a spy. This is the reading where the quantifier is naturally understood as taking wide scope relative to the attitude verb and as binding a variable within the scope of the attitude verb. This essay is interested in addressing the question what the semantic analysis of this kind of reading should look like from a Fregean perspective—a perspective according to which attitude states are generally relations to structured…
  • Interpreting Quantum Theories

    Weatherall, J. O.
    15 Jun 2015 | 10:30 am
  • Mind, Brain, and Free Will

    Franklin, C. E.
    15 Jun 2015 | 10:30 am
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    Feminist Philosophers

  • Anonymity of peer review reports ‘definitely’ enables egregious behavior

    KateNorlock
    6 Jul 2015 | 5:46 pm
    In the last couple years, I have presided over or assisted in peer-review processes for journal issues, anthologies, and conferences in Philosophy, with one consistently repeated shock across all venues, at least in my limited experience so far: It seemed to me as if anonymized peer-review seemed to bring out something vindictive in almost half of referees. Everyone who’s had an infamous “Reviewer #2” experience may be nodding right now, but I did not expect this. (I’ve gotten my own wee share of mean reviews, yes. But I am still surprised.) It caused me to seriously question…
  • What’s wrong with women’s speech, Part 352

    jennysaul
    5 Jul 2015 | 11:03 am
    Last week, people started getting very excited about an article alleging that women’s tendency to use “just” makes them sound weak.  An old university friend and I on Facebook found ourselves both somehow annoyed, and had a good time exchanging examples of “weak” speech like “just fuck off!”  The whole thing reminded me of old criticisms of women’s use of tag questions, now debunked.  So I was thrilled to read this lovely blog post. A small sample: This endless policing of women’s language—their voices, their intonation patterns, the…
  • Shame/blame/guilt: a good way to produce nurturing, helpful women

    annejjacobson
    4 Jul 2015 | 12:00 pm
    Please note:  I suspect that the passage shown below is in fact drawn from studies of cis white women.  One difficulty in telling how ethnicity and gender queerness interact with the prevalence of depression in woman is that the facts discussed in the quoted passage below are not even well-recognized in the quasi-popular literature.  It’s as though continued assaults on the souls of young women aren’t medical enough. (I am not saying that the passage below is correct; rather the point is the kind of explanation that it provides and that needs to be considered. Also, please…
  • Important new paper on the under-representation of women in philosophy

    jennysaul
    2 Jul 2015 | 11:20 pm
    There’s a really important new paper out, based on a study at Sydney.  The headline news is that the study shows: (a) At the very start of their first intro class, there are already significant gender differences in attitudes toward philosophy, with men generally more positively disposed toward the subject, more likely to think they’ll do well, and more likely to think they might major in it. (b) This does not change from beginning to end of the semester. They take this so suggest that key causes of the underrepresentation are already in place prior to university, but also…
  • Venues for public philosophy?

    annejjacobson
    27 Jun 2015 | 8:15 am
    one way to encourage more philosophy in public discourse may be to draw up a list of good venues. So let’s do that. Here’s a start: Huff Po The Stone, in the NY Times NY Times op ed Aeon And??? PSmag The Critique
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    In Socrates' Wake

  • AAPT: Workshop on Teaching and Learning in Philosophy

    Michael Cholbi
    2 Jul 2015 | 10:52 am
    CALL FOR APPLICATIONSThe American Association of Philosophy Teachers (AAPT)“To Improve The Quality Of Instruction In Philosophy At All Levels”Teaching & Learning in Philosophy: Dallas/Ft.WorthLocation:                     North Texas University, Denton, TXDate:                           Saturday, September 26,…
  • APA session: The philosophy major

    Michael Cholbi
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:49 am
    The APA Committee on Teaching Philosophy is seeking participants for a panel on the philosophy major, to be held at the Eastern Division meeting (January 2016, Washington D.C.). The deadline to volunteer is August 10. More details here.
  • APA session: Advice for job candidates on the teaching demo

    Michael Cholbi
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:29 am
    The APA Committee on Teaching Philosophy is seeking participants for a panel (Eastern meeting, January 2016, Washington DC) to advise job candidates on teaching demonstrations. The deadline to volunteer is August 17. More details here.
  • CFP: Teaching Philosophy, etc., at Indiana Philosophical Association

    Michael Cholbi
    9 Jun 2015 | 9:45 am
    Call for PapersIndiana Philosophical AssociationFall Meeting, 13-14 November 2015Earlham College (Richmond, Indiana)Keynote SpeakerWalter BroganVillanova UniversityPapers in any area of philosophy are welcome. Submitted papers should be (i) no more than3000 words, (ii) prepared for anonymous review, and (iii) accompanied by a separate page thatincludes title, author information (name, affiliation, and contact information), and an abstractnot exceeding 150 words. Materials should be submitted to Prof. Sam Kahn atindianacfp@gmail.com. Suggestions for commentators and sessions chairs (including…
  • Why Study Philosophy?

    Nathan Nobis
    27 May 2015 | 6:46 am
    Here is a likely useful resource for philosophy teachers, to help respond to the question, "Why study philosophy?" "Why study philosophy?" "See http://www.WhyStudyPhilosophy.com‪ !"Anyone interested in contributing to the page, and helping improve it, can contact Nathan. 
 
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    Philosophy by the Way

  • Making up for an omission

    6 Jul 2015 | 4:38 am
    John Locke made the idea of consciousness the heart of his theory of man. He was the first who developed a thorough theory of consciousness. That’s why I called him the father of consciousness theories in my last blog, although he didn’t invent the concept. Many theories of consciousness followed since then. Some such theories, which often refer explicitly to Locke, discuss the question what a person is, since Locke was also the first philosopher who defined the concept of person. I, too, have written about this subject, in blogs and in articles. What I never did, however, was quoting…
  • Locke's tremendous idea

    28 Jun 2015 | 4:22 pm
    According to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, John Locke defined consciousness as “the perception of what passes in a man’s own mind.” I suppose that it is true that Locke said so, although I cannot check it, for there is no reference added to the quotation, which actually is to be expected in a work of that standing. Anyway, the passage is not from the famous chapter XXVII “Of Identity and Diversity” in Locke’s An Essay concerning Human Understanding (first published in 1689, but this chapter was added in 1694). Here Locke develops the idea of personal identity and links it to the…
  • Descartes' tremendous idea

    21 Jun 2015 | 4:21 pm
    Science is a modern idea. In my last blog I wrote that Montaigne was an essayist and a writer. He was also a keen observer. By writing down his observations, Montaigne broadened our view on ourselves and environment and our self-insight. But Montaigne was not a scientist; he was not an investigator. In his time the idea of science was yet developing and by his view that everything can be doubted Montaigne contributed to its development. His adage was “What do I know?”, which would later find expression in the doubt that Descartes used for laying the foundations of the ideas of knowledge…
  • What everybody knows

    14 Jun 2015 | 4:26 pm
    In his essay “Of virtue” (Essays II-29) Montaigne writes about the case of a Turkish lord who in vain tried to shoot a hare. Also his dogs didn’t succeed to catch the animal. Therefore the lord concluded that the hare had been protected by his fate. This made Montaigne remark: “This story may serve ... to let us see how flexible our reason is to all sorts of images.”A few years ago I wrote a blog about Festinger’s theory of cognitive dissonance, which says that when there is a gap between what we believe and what actually is the case we try to adapt the facts to our believes (see…
  • Art as a daily practice

    7 Jun 2015 | 4:49 pm
    In his “Afterword” to Michel de Certeau’s Culture in the Plural, Tom Conley writes: “[For de Certeau] ‘culture’ needs to be understood not as a monument celebrating human mastery of nature but, to the contrary, and more modestly, as collective ways or manners of thinking and doing. ... [Culture] is marked by heterogeneity of practices, styles, modes or fashions of selectively and affectively producing (but not arrogating) habitable space.” (Conley, p. 151). In other words, according to de Certeau culture is not something highbrow, as it is often seen, but it is the way we do…
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    The Brooks Blog

  • Hegel Society of Great Britain 2015 conference

    30 Jun 2015 | 3:12 pm
    “Hegel and the Philosophy of Mind” September 3, 2015 to September 4, 2015 At St Edmund Hall, OxfordConference ProgrammePlease note that the registration deadline is 1st August 2015.Thursday, 3rd September1.00-1.30 Conference registration1.30-3.00 Paul Redding (University of Sydney): “Hegel’s Subjective Logic as a Logic for (Hegel’s) Philosophy of Mind”3.30-5.00 Karen Ng (Vanderbilt University): “Life and Mind in Hegel’s Subjective Spirit”5.30-7.00 Markus Gabriel (Universität Bonn): “Intuitions, Names and Propositions in Hegel’s Philosophy of Subjective…
  • "How Not to Save the Planet"

    28 Jun 2015 | 12:03 pm
    . . . is the title of my forthcoming target article at the journal Ethics, Policy & Environment. The abstract:"Climate change presents us with perhaps the most pressing challenge today. But is it a problem we can solve? This article argues that existing conservationist and adaptation approaches fail to satisfy their objectives. A second issue that these approaches disagree about how best to end climate change, but accept that it is a problem that can be solved. I believe this view is mistaken: a future environmental catastrophe is an event we might at best postpone, but not avoid. This…
  • Which philosophy blogs do you read?

    26 Jun 2015 | 10:45 am
    Brian Leiter has a poll up now. VOTE HERE for your favourite blogs. Delighted to see The Brooks Blog made the list.
  • New report out on A Practical Guide to Living in the UK

    24 Jun 2015 | 4:32 pm
    A link to the report and relevant pages can be found here [READ MORE]. And more. And more still.The press release that I've sent out is:New migrant guide is ‘unfit for purpose’  The Government’s guide for migrants features numerous errors and omissions, according to a new report by a Durham University academic. Thom Brooks, Professor in Law and Government at Durham University said the guide is ‘unfit for purpose’. His report shows mistakes in the guide’s information on gaining UK residency and citizenship, on marrying or divorcing a non-British citizen and…
  • Labour must not be 'squeamish' about immigration

    19 Jun 2015 | 4:17 am
    . . . is the title of my latest piece for LabourList [READ MORE].
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    Stephen Law

  • CFI event: God, Religion, and The Bible - Sat 19th Sept. Conway Hall WC1R

    3 Jul 2015 | 5:12 am
    Join Professors Francesca Stavrakopoulou, Dr Keith Ward and Dr Stephen Law in debate and discussion of God and the Bible.10.30 Registration11.00-12.10: Professor Francesca Stavrakopoulou: The real religions of the BibleFrancesca Stavrakopoulou is Professor of the Hebrew Bible and Ancient religion at Exeter's Department of Theology and Religion. She presented the BBC TV series The Bible's Buried Secrets and also contributed to Channel 4's The Bible: A History. Prof Stavrakopoulou is an atheist. Her books include Religious Diversity in Ancient Israel and Judea.12.10 -…
  • Muslim-produced image of Mohammad

    2 Jun 2015 | 9:34 am
    Image source here. This five-storey mural was commissioned by the Iranian Government in 2008.As this article points out, the tradition of depicting  Mohammad in human form 'is common in Shia Iran, where until recently postcards, pictures and even carpets depicting the prophet could be found on sale.'
  • Science, Reason and Skepticism - from Wiley Blackwell Handbook to Humanism (just out)

    13 May 2015 | 5:08 am
    (unedited draft, not final copy)Science, Reason and Skepticism[1]Stephen LawWhat are science and reason?Humanists expound the virtues of science and reason. But what are science and reason? And why should we think it wise to rely on them? By science, I mean that approach to finding out about reality based on the scientific method. This is a method that was fully developed only a few hundred years ago (though of course we find elements being applied even in the ancient world)). Science, as I’ll use the term here, is a comparatively recent invention[AC1] , its development owing a great…
  • Skeptical Theism - primer for the uninitiated

    8 May 2015 | 7:06 am
    Heard of skeptical theism? Perhaps not. But it's all the rage in certain religious circles. So, to get you up to speed, here's a quick primer.There's a good chance your religious opponent will be familiar with skeptical theism and will use against you in an argument about the existence of God.  So it's wise to be prepared.Continues here....
  • Angry at God

    6 May 2015 | 5:40 am
    Stephen Maitzen has an interesting paper here. The final paragraph is amusing and spot on:Living in a society still dominated by an inherited theistic outlook, atheists like me are not infrequently accused of being “angry at God” and venting our anger in the form of arguments such as those I’ve offered here. The accusation is patronizing, question-begging, and false. Any atheist who can think straight knows that anger at God makes no sense. I’m no more “angry at God” than I’m angry at Santa Claus for failing to relieve me of the burden of Christmas shopping. If I’m angry at…
 
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    gonepublic: philosophy, politics, & public life

  • Neoliberalism, the Street, and the Forum (or what the Eurozone could learn from the Greek left)

    Noelle McAfee
    2 Jul 2015 | 8:15 pm
    My Greek Uncle Rathos spent two months living in the dark. In September 2011, in response to pressure from its European creditors, the Greek government imposed a new property tax to be paid via electric utility bills.[1] A construction contractor hit hard by the financial crisis, my uncle couldn’t make those tax payments and so his electricity was cut off. Reportedly, 350,000 other households suffered the same fate.[2] This was just one in a series of austerity measures demanded by the International Monetary Fund and other lenders to deal with the supposed debt crisis: i.e., that Greece’s…
  • philoSOPHIA 2015 at Emory May 14-16, 2015

    Noelle McAfee
    10 May 2015 | 5:56 pm
    philoSOPHIA 2015 Ninth Annual Conference The Neolithic to the Neoliberal: Communities Human and Non-Human Emory University Atlanta, GA May 14-16, 2015 Local Hosts: Cynthia Willett | Noëlle McAfee | Erin Tarver Graduate Assistant: Lilyana Levy Keynote Speakers: Drucilla Cornell | Lisa Guenther & Chloë Taylor | Kelly Oliver Many Thanks to our Generous Sponsors: Subvention Fund, Hightower Fund, Emory Center for Ethics, Department of Philosophy, Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of African American Studies, Department of…
  • epistemic deliberative theory

    Noelle McAfee
    25 Feb 2015 | 7:13 pm
    Advocates of epistemic deliberative democracy point to deliberations’ propensity to track the truth.  Could someone please explain to me what truth there is to track on political matters, which by their very nature are political because no one can agree on a truth that would adjudicate the matter? This seems folly from top to bottom.
  • philoSOPHIA Conference at Emory May 14-16, 2015

    Noelle McAfee
    17 Feb 2015 | 6:34 pm
    I’m helping organize the 9th Annual Meeting of the feminist philosophy society, philoSOPHIA.  The lineup is amazing…. philoSOPHIA 2015 9th Annual Conference The Neolithic to the Neoliberal: Communities Human and Non-Human Emory University Atlanta, GA May 14-16, 2015 Local Hosts: Cynthia Willett | Noëlle McAfee | Erin Tarver Keynote Speakers: Drucilla Cornell | Lisa Guenther & Chloë Taylor | Kelly Oliver Preliminary Program: Thursday May 14: 5:00-7:00 Check-in and Registration at Emory Conference Center Hotel 7:00- 9:00 Welcome and Opening Remarks, Carla Freeman, Emory…
  • Richard Rorty 1997 on Democracy and Philosophy

    Noelle McAfee
    16 Jan 2015 | 4:53 pm
    When I was a graduate student at the University of Texas at Austin in the 1990s, I was an occasional guest host on a public affairs program of the local PBS station. In 1997 I interviewed the philosopher Richard Rorty. This afternoon, with the help of Emory graduate student Karen McCarthy, I finally got around to digitizing it. Then we uploaded it to YouTube.  It’s kind of eery watching it again.  So many of the issues Rorty and I discussed are still with us today in the clash of cultures between religion and secularism, attempts at democratization in the Middle East versus the…
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    Alexander Pruss's Blog

  • Attempted murder

    6 Jul 2015 | 12:31 pm
    Every wrong act is wrong because it wrongs someone or something. Say that an act is fundamentally self-wronging provided that it is wrong because it wrongs oneself. It's controversial whether there are fundamentally self-wronging acts, but I think there are. However, attempted murder (as long as it's not attempted suicide) is not a self-wronging act. But now imagine that Bob is the only contingent being in existence, and Bob attempts to murder someone else (of course, to do that he will presumably have to have a false belief that there is another contingent being). Bob commits attempted…
  • Extension and mereological universalism

    6 Jul 2015 | 10:03 am
    Plausibly, a fusion of extended objects is extended. Also, plausibly, an extended object has a size. Now suppose, as is surely possible, that there are two universes that aren't spatiotemporally connected, and an extended object A in one and another extended object B in another. Then the fusion of A and B would be an extended object that has no size, since there is no meaningful distance between a part of A and a part of B. Hence, given our assumptions about extended objects, mereological universalism--the thesis that necessarily all pluralities have a fusion--is false.
  • Symmetries in laws

    3 Jul 2015 | 5:15 pm
    Theists have often noticed that theism provides a nice aesthetically-based explanation for why we have simple laws, namely that such laws are beautiful and this gave God reason to enact them. (One can run this in two ways: (1) such laws are objectively beautiful, and God made them because of their objective beauty; (2) such laws are beautiful to us, and God created a world where the laws are beautiful to the intelligent creatures therein.)Another interesting question about the fundamental laws is why they exhibit such nice symmetries. This question on its face seems independent of the…
  • It is more blessed to give than to receive

    30 Jun 2015 | 9:44 am
    On the one hand, Jesus tells us that it is more blessed to give than to receive. On the other hand, Socrates tells us in the Gorgias:And what sort of a person am I? One of those who are happy to be refuted if they make a false statement, happy also to refute anyone else who may do the same, yet not less happy to be refuted than to refute. For I think the former a greater benefit, in proportion as it is of greater benefit to be oneself delivered from the greatest harm than to deliver another. No worse harm, it is true, can befall a man than to hold wrong opinions on the matters now under…
  • Hiddenness and heroism

    29 Jun 2015 | 8:58 am
    Heroism that involves facing death would not be so heroic if the hero felt completely certain of a good afterlife. But given the close rational connection between the existence of God and posthumous rewards and punishment, a connection that is also emotionally ingrained in us, for it to be heroic for us to face death a certain hiddenness of God appears necessary. The hiddenness would only need to be emotional: God's existence (or love or justice, I guess) would need to feel uncertain. And of course what goes for heroically facing death also applies to more minor sacrifices and obedience to…
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    The Splintered Mind

  • How In-Between Cases of Belief Differ Normatively from In-Between Cases of Extraversion

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    2 Jul 2015 | 12:40 pm
    For twenty years, I've been advocating a dispositional account of belief, according to which to believe that P is to match, to an appropriate degree and in appropriate respects, a "dispositional stereotype" characteristic of the belief that P. In other words: All there is to believing that P is being disposed, ceteris paribus (all else equal or normal or right), to act and react, internally and externally, like a stereotypical belief-that-P-er. Since the beginning, two concerns have continually nagged at me. One concern is the metaphysical relation between belief and outward behavior. It…
  • A New Podcast Interview of Me

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    29 Jun 2015 | 10:59 am
    here. Thanks to Daniel Bensen for the fun interview! We discuss the rights of artificial intelligences, whether our moral intuitions break down in far-out SF cases, the relationship between science fiction and philosophy, and my recent story "Momentary Sage".
  • Celebrate the Nerd!

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    25 Jun 2015 | 8:00 am
    Here's my definition of a nerd: A nerd is someone who loves an intellectual topic, for its own sake, to an unreasonable degree. The nerd might be unreasonably passionate about Leibnizian metaphysics, for example -- she studies Latin, French, and German so she can master the original texts, she stays up late reading neglected passages, argues intensely about obscure details with anyone who has the patience to listen. Or she loves twin primes in that same way, or the details of Napoleonic warfare, or the biology of squids. How could anyone care so much about such things? It's not that the nerd…
  • Why Do We Care about Discovering Life, Exactly?

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    18 Jun 2015 | 8:00 am
    It would be exciting to discover life on another planet -- no doubt about that! But why would it be exciting? Let's start with a contrast: the possibility of finding intelligence that is not alive -- a robot or a god, without means of reproduction. (Standard textbook definitions, philosophy of biology, and NASA-sponsored discussions all tend to define "life" partly in terms of reproduction.) I'm inclined to think that the search for extra-terrestrial life would have been successful in its aims if we discovered a manufactured robot or a non-reproducing god, even if such beings are not…
  • What Philosophical Work Could Be

    Eric Schwitzgebel
    11 Jun 2015 | 6:54 am
    Academic philosophers in Anglophone Ph.D.-granting departments tend to have a narrow conception of what counts as valuable philosophical work. Hiring, tenure, promotion, and prestige turn mainly on one's ability to write an essay in a particular theoretical, abstract style, normally in reaction to the work of a small group of canonical historical and 20th century figures, on a fairly constrained range of topics, published in a limited range of journals and presses. This is too narrow a view. I won't discuss cultural diversity here, which I have addressed elsewhere. Today I'll focus on genre…
 
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    In the Space of Reasons

  • Dialogues in Philosophy, Mental and Neuro Sciences

    26 Jun 2015 | 3:03 am
    I see that there is a new issue of this online journal.Here.
  • Delivering training to post graduate students?

    24 Jun 2015 | 10:00 am
    After a chance comment at a Graduate Research Student Forum to one of the senior administrators I got an email today from someone asking whether I’d be prepared to convene a session on publication on the basis of my role as Senior Editor of Philosophy, Psychiatry & Psychology.All fine and dandy. But I was struck by the title of the email which talked of ‘delivering training to post graduate students’ and a slight shiver ran up my spine. Why? Well obviously I should look to the philosophy of education and training but my remaining PhD annual progression monitoring forms for this…
  • Motivational speaking as instant enlightenment

    16 Jun 2015 | 5:18 am
    Every year my School (a subdivision of the University) organises a ‘School Conference’ with various speakers, workshops etc as a piece of CPD. I make an effort to go and, despite the other things I could get done, it is generally worth it. This year’s started with a motivational speaker speaking to a title ‘Resilience’ but outlining – in a spirit influenced by the UK cycle team's aggregation of marginal gains – a number of small improvements for organisational performance. I say ‘organisational’ but they were aimed at individuals: ten or twelve plus a few other changes we…
  • Rereading Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance after 32 years

    20 May 2015 | 2:24 pm
    My old friend Derek, who spends his days repairing a couple of aging Moulton bicycles, reminded me by email of a scene in Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenancein which the motorcycle maintaining narrator alienates his friend John by offering to repair the latter’s expensive BMW with a beer can shim [Pirsig 2009]. John, we are told, prizes the appearance of things, or ‘romantic quality’ and thus cannot see the ‘classical’ quality that attaches to underlying form, to a properly functioning motorcycle with non-wobbly handlebars.Not being able to recall the point of the scene, I…
  • Campbell on the meaning-rationality link in delusions

    13 May 2015 | 8:06 am
    Aline, Gloria and I met together to discuss John Campbell’s 2001 paper ‘Rationality, meaning and the analysis of delusion’. As a result I think I have a clearer picture of why I disagree with it than before. The following are thus not my own thoughts (though neither do I want to saddle - my expression of - them onto either of my colleagues).Campbell’s paper divides between two phases of argument. In the first, he deploys a Davidsonian link between meaning and rationality to press problems with the interpretation of characteristic expressions of the Capgras delusion. The characteristic…
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    Freemason Information

  • Clandestine Masons and Clandestine Freemasonry

    Greg Stewart
    4 Jul 2015 | 9:42 am
    In this installment of Symbols & Symbolism we look at a reading from Albert G. Mackey’s Encyclopedia of Freemasonry on the meanings behind Clandestine, Clandestine Lodge and a Clandestine Freemason. The video, deals with the first two subjects, the third is a subject of much contention creating clear vernacular delineation of what IS and what IS NOT considered by the various denominations of the fraternity. You can find more installments of these educational pieces under Symbols & Symbolism, and on YouTube. Clandestine The ordinary meaning of this word is secret, hidden. The French…
  • Thank you for the Declaration of Independence

    Greg Stewart
    3 Jul 2015 | 2:05 am
    Thank you for the Declaration of Independence. Thank you for the strength, bravery, and dedication to fight so that I may have the opportunities I have today. I hope that I may live up to a fraction of the standard you set before me. I am in awe of your courage and your forethought for our freedom. Happy 4th of July. Should you need a little something to talk about over the holiday BBQ’s and the Firework celebrations, I wanted to share with you the role of Freemasonry and our Freedoms today. Freemasonry may not have created the Declaration of Independence, but its principals of…
  • Boston Time Capsule Returned To Its 1795 Burial Place, With A Few Modern Items

    Fred Milliken
    18 Jun 2015 | 1:29 am
      The Guardian reports: In an elaborate ceremony steeped in tradition, a time capsule dating to 1795 was returned on Wednesday to the cornerstone of the Massachusetts Statehouse, with a set of 2015 US mint coins and a silver plaque added to its contents for a future generation to discover.   A procession of freemasons marched up Beacon Hill as a fife and drum corps, clad in Colonial garb, played on the statehouse lawn. Military units stood at attention and a 19-gun salute was fired, all part of an effort to approximate the historically documented atmosphere of 4 July 1795, when the…
  • Our Legacy

    TimBryce
    12 Jun 2015 | 3:00 am
    BRYCE ON LIFE – Will we be remembered for tangible objects or the people we come in contact with? (Click for AUDIO VERSION) To use this segment in a Radio broadcast or Podcast, send TIM a request. Something just about all of us consider at some point in our lives is our legacy, be it on a small scale such as a job or project, or our life’s work. Nagging questions linger, “How will I be remembered?”, “Did I do a good job?” or “Was my life well spent?” Some people believe we are judged by physical objects such as a building we constructed, the…
  • Mosaic Pavement or the Checkered Flooring

    Greg Stewart
    7 Jun 2015 | 9:39 am
    In this installment of Symbols & Symbolism, we look at a reading from Albert G. Mackey’s Encyclopedia of Freemasonry and its Kindred Sciences on the symbolism behind the mosaic (or checkered) pavement, objects that, Mackey says, are “appropriately interpreted as symbols of the evil and good of human life” You can read more installments of Mackey’s Encyclopedia under Symbols & Symbolism here on this site and video of these segments on YouTube. Samuel Lee depiction of Solomons Temple Mosaic Pavement Mosaic work consists properly of many little stones of different…
 
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    The Mindful Word

  • TECH? NO!: Education without the gimmicks

    Cindy McMann
    6 Jul 2015 | 12:41 pm
    One of the things most taken for granted nowadays in education is that technology will make for better classroom experiences and better learning. School boards […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • THE DESIRED PERSON: Your relationship status does not define your self-worth

    editor
    5 Jul 2015 | 6:18 am
    THE DESIRED PERSON: Your relationship with others doesn’t depend on your relationship status We live in an era of elaborate proposals and glamorous weddings, where public declarations of passionate love are all around us. We can’t escape them even if we tried. Our calendars are filled with invitations to bachelorette parties, weddings and baby showers. Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • TO BE A PATRIOT: The many ways to show patriotism

    Kyla Giffin
    4 Jul 2015 | 4:14 pm
    The dictionary definition of patriotism is absolute love, commitment, faithfulness and sacrifice for one’s nation. But does that mean that one must be willing to […] Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • A FRIENDSHIP’S BOND: Story by Tihana Skoric

    editor
    3 Jul 2015 | 10:54 am
    A FRIENDSHIP’S BOND: Story by Tihana Skoric I met Tom and Brian at school by the oak tree. It’s the largest tree at our school, so we fashioned it into a sort of beacon where we can always find each other. We meet here everyday before classes. We have been doing this as a ritual for the last two years. Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
  • ALLOW LOVE: Let love in, no matter your beliefs

    editor
    1 Jul 2015 | 12:02 pm
    ALLOW LOVE: Let love in, no matter your beliefs Looking through social media comments there are so many people preaching the word of god, saying that those who don’t believe in him are sinners and will go to hell. On the other end, there are atheists who bash believers for having a religion and following the Bible. Why can’t we all just get along? Continue reading at The Mindful Word journal of engaged living [http://www.themindfulword.org]
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    The Philosophers' Cocoon

  • Should journals have clear reviewing standards?

    Marcus Arvan
    6 Jul 2015 | 10:59 am
    I have received some amazing sets of comments from journal reviewers before. Some of them have been detailed and helpful, others detailed and critical. Whatever the reviewer thinks of my paper--whether they advocate acceptance, rejection, or whatever--as long as they provide a detailed report, I am satisfied. Indeed, I am even willing to take misreadings of my work with a grain of salt--as an indication, that is, that I could be clearer about something so that people don't misread what I've written. I have no trouble accepting criticism, providing the person giving it actually…
  • Independence Day Interludes

    Marcus Arvan
    3 Jul 2015 | 8:28 am
    Given the long Independence Day weekend here in the US and the fact that I will be away for a few days on a (much needed) vacation (and wedding anniversary!), I thought I might leave you all with a few tunes to relax to. Enjoy!     
  • A Note on Academic Publishing in Philosophy

    Axel Gelfert
    2 Jul 2015 | 9:19 am
    Helen's recent post contrasting different publication strategies included a number of interesting points. Perhaps the most important point, it seems to me, is the realization that there are different, equally legitimate publication strategies in the first place. Those of us working in areas like history of philosophy or philosophy of science do not stand to profit much from publishing in 'top' general journals (the 'Healy Four' etc.), but we might occasionally still give it a shot (what Helen calls the 'buying a lottery ticket' strategy) -- for example when…
  • Featured Early-Career Author Series

    Marcus Arvan
    2 Jul 2015 | 6:01 am
    A while back we had a Featured Author series that, until yesterday, I had sort of forgotten about. I'd like to try to resurrect the series, as one thing I've always hoped the Cocoon could do is to serve as a forum for early-career authors to promote and discuss their work. We all know, after all, how hard it is to get one's work read and cited, particularly early in one's career. So, here's your chance! Would you like to promote and discuss your work? If so, don't be shy--just shoot me an email at marvan@ut.edu to sign up! Anyone who is an early-career…
  • Recent work by Cocooners (May & June)

    Marcus Arvan
    1 Jul 2015 | 11:30 am
    The following works were either published or posted to philpapers by Cocoon contributors during the months of May and June: Helen De Cruz (forthcoming). Disagreement, by Bryan Frances. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1. Axel Gelfert (2015). Symbol Systems as Collective Representational Resources: Mary Hesse, Nelson Goodman, and the Problem of Scientific Representation. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4 (6):52-61. Justin Snedegar (2015). Contrastivism About Reasons and Ought. Philosophy Compass 10 (6):379-388. Moti Mizrahi (forthcoming). Historical Inductions,…
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    Re-constructing Strategy

  • What if the US Disappeared?

    saqib qureshi
    4 Jul 2015 | 12:06 pm
    Of course that’s not happening, unless somebody knows how to use the Force in ways which George Lucas hasn’t envisioned, but let’s just imagine a world in which the US government completely withdraws from the rest of the world. Let us just imagine. This is not a bizarre idea. After all, hundreds of millions of people world over accuse the US of failing to mind its own business, of interfering and poking its nose where it’s not wanted. And there is also the non-interventionist tradition within American foreign policy, a position that ironically enough emanates from Robert Walpole,…
  • The GOP: More Dust to Eat

    saqib qureshi
    15 Jun 2015 | 8:44 am
    At the heart of the American presidential electoral campaign will be the battle for America’s self-identity. Some 130 million voters will hand in their ballots in 2016 to define what America is, what it stands for and where it is going. Issues of racial, sexual and religious identity will continue to stamp their mark, as they have increasingly done in recent decades. And as American gradually redefines itself, one party is only a slippery slope to annihilation. America’s racial coming of age continues at an incredible pace. In 2000, some 12% of Americans were Hispanics. By 2016, that’s…
  • 3 Things That Every CEO Should Know About Strategy

    saqib qureshi
    25 May 2015 | 7:57 am
    1) Trying to make sense of how things are today, of the universe that the business operates in, is inherently subjective. Objectivity is in fact always subjective. No aspect of our business jumps up at us and identifies itself. We implicitly elect to see our customers as such; or our assets as such; or an investment as such. These are human choices to see aspects of our business in a certain way. The starting point of strategy is therefore as much a personal choice as it reflects what’s happening out there. 2) How we self-identify is the mirror of how we identify everything beyond…
  • Islamic Reform: Beyond the Nasty Alliance

    saqib qureshi
    5 Apr 2015 | 7:21 pm
    Over the last few years, I’ve noticed a small but distinct emergence of a stream of Muslim consciousness that is critical of orthodox Islam. Twenty years ago, I can’t remember coming across a Muslim critique of Islam – certainly not a sharp one. Salman Rushdie’s ‘Satanic Verses’ was provocative, but hardly an analysis or evaluation. Today, it’s almost fashionable for Muslims to poke at Islam…. and the Western media is often only too keen to fan their flames. Much of that emergence owes itself to the support offered by racist, xenophobic Islamophobes who have become notably…
  • You Know You’re at an Archetypal ‘Islamic’ Event when….

    saqib qureshi
    28 Mar 2015 | 8:42 pm
    Without exception, everybody is either a ‘sister’ or a ‘brother’ … irrespective of any underlying aroused sense of intimacy between any of the ‘sisters’ and the ‘brothers’ ; and notwithstanding whether the attendees themselves self-identify in those terms The ratio of long-bearded men to clean-shaved men is so out of whack with what’s to be found in society at large Many ‘sisters’ are frightened out of their minds at the prospect of sitting alongside, greeting or even acknowledging the existence of any of the ‘brothers’, even though they’ll have no problem…
 
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    The Universe Inside My Head

  • When Machines Rise

    Dracomega1
    29 Jun 2015 | 3:11 pm
    How screwed are we? Thiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiis ^screwed.Continue reading →
  • A World Of Total Security

    Dracomega1
    26 Jun 2015 | 2:20 pm
    Warning: Satire Ahead A MODEST PROPOSAL FOR PREVENTING TERRORISM IN ALL OF ITS FORMS AND THE FURTHER EXPANSION OF SECURITY …Continue reading →
  • The Cave

    Dracomega1
    24 Jun 2015 | 4:59 pm
    Long ago in a cave somewhere, Lay a tired man with an empty stare. Shackles of steel held him down, …Continue reading →
  • What is the Meaning of Life?

    Dracomega1
    2 Jul 2014 | 12:08 pm
    Since the dawn of humanity, we have always had one question in the back of our minds. Why are we …Continue reading →
  • The Sound of Silence

    Dracomega1
    27 Jun 2014 | 1:16 pm
    We’re all so busy these days. Too often, we find ourselves hung up in the endless routine of life. You …Continue reading →
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    A Brighter Everyday

  • Blogging Communities Demystified

    Enock Machodi
    6 Jul 2015 | 5:46 pm
    If you’ve been blogging for some time without getting any results; or you’ve just started out, you understand that driving traffic to your blog can be frustrating. It’s even more frustrating if you have a new site. This leaves you with one option – and that’s to depend on traffic from other traffic referral sources.… Read More The post Blogging Communities Demystified appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • Warning Bloggers! Are You Doing This The Wrong Way?

    Enock Machodi
    24 Jun 2015 | 6:17 am
    If you run a blog that has a following, it means you lead a community of like-minded people. They are there because they love what you do. They get value from reading what you write because you help them solve their problems. So you are responsible for engaging community members who frequent your blog by… Read More The post Warning Bloggers! Are You Doing This The Wrong Way? appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • How To Overcome Blogger’s Block By Leveraging PLR Content

    Enock Machodi
    17 Jun 2015 | 5:43 pm
    Blogging should be about giving value to your readers and motivating them to do more. But there are times when you are just unable to come up with brave ideas for your next blog post. And the result is frustration! frustration! frustration! You are left with thoughts that never seem to be ending soon, and… Read More The post How To Overcome Blogger’s Block By Leveraging PLR Content appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • My kingged.com addiction and why the site is creating buzz around the blogging community

    Enock Machodi
    7 Jun 2015 | 3:36 pm
    Let’s be honest with each other here. Growing a blog and making it part of your life takes time and commitment. I recently decided to start a new blog, which is part of a network of blogs under my belt and so far its doing well; thanks to the influential bloggers who have been there… Read More The post My kingged.com addiction and why the site is creating buzz around the blogging community appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
  • To Unleash Your Blogging Potential For Excellence – Think Big

    Enock Machodi
    5 Jun 2015 | 1:42 am
    Bloggers come in many forms. There are those who will blog to excellence and those who will quit after days, weeks or even months of testing out the murky waters of blogging. The big question is why? This is a long, valuable and informative post – so I hope you can spare some of your… Read More The post To Unleash Your Blogging Potential For Excellence – Think Big appeared first on A Brighter Everyday.
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    Papercuts

  • Girls are better than boys, and this is why (Safwa Stories)

    kaytus89
    15 Jun 2015 | 12:54 pm
    The Tale of Boys and Girls  There once lived two brothers. The first  conceived several boys and mocked his brother for only fathering girls. One day, during a gathering, a friend of the daughters-only sibling suggested to his saddened friend that the next time he is mocked, he should suggest that his younger daughter and the eldest son of his brother travel together in order to discover which of the two is better and more successful.   Soon after this, the daughters-only sibling was mocked by his brother again for only conceiving girls and so the traveling plan was brought up. The…
  • Creepy Saudi Bedtime Stories- the real Cinderella story

    kaytus89
    1 Jun 2015 | 8:36 am
    You  may recognise several aspects of this story, but you’ll be surprised by some of the disturbing twists: There was once a young girl called Fatima who lived with her stepmother. As in all Cinderella stories, she was constantly mistreated  and in charge of all the cooking and housework. One day, she was given 7 fish to clean in the springs for their dinner. She began her work but to her surprise one of the fish slipped from her fingers and began to talk. ‘Please, let me go and I’ll make you rich’. Fatima was frightened by the fish but even more so at the prospect…
  • Diary of a Shiite Kid- a regular day in the life of a regular Shiite

    kaytus89
    24 May 2015 | 7:39 am
    1- Wake up in the morning, change my clothes, brush my teeth and curse at the Prophet’s companions. 2- Stop by the cemetery for my usual grave worshiping rites, because who needs God when you have holy dead people? 3- Enjoy a day of hypocritical dealings with all my Sunni acquaintances whom I all secretly despise. 4-Trim my tail on my way back home from work. What? You thought I was human? 5-Brush up on my Farsi in my Iranian club where I also swear allegiance to the Supreme Leader and concoct various plans on how to spread fitna, schism and violence in the Muslim world. Yes, it’s true.
  • Creepy Saudi Bedtime Stories that will Keep you Awake at Night

    kaytus89
    13 May 2015 | 5:02 am
    These are some traditional Safwani bedtime stories. And yes, they are children stories. Sfouf- a tale of jealousy and cannibalism There was once a bright young boy called Sfouf. His mother had passed away and so he now lived with his father and jealous stepmother who hated him very much. One day, Sfouf’s father asked his wife to start preparing for for a grand dinner party for some guests that were coming over. The jealous stepmother took this opportunity to get rid of Sfouf once and for all. The next day she picked up Sfouf from school with the excuse that his father wanted him. This…
  • Is Feminism the new Patriarchy? 6 reasons why you shouldn’t be a feminist

    kaytus89
    3 May 2015 | 7:37 am
    Intellectual equality, equal pay and female rights are aspects of feminist movements that no one would disagree with. However, certain feminist groups have taken their role too far and are in many ways doing more harm than good. Here are some reasons why you should think twice before buying into certain aspects of feminist ideology: 1-  It undermines traditional female roles. Certain prominent female figures have been known to attack traditional female roles.  Not too long ago, a feminist blogger called Amy Glass sparked outrage due to a post titled: ‘’I Look Down On Young Women…
 
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    Ashish Dalela

  • Models and Reality

    admin
    11 Jun 2015 | 7:16 am
    During recent online conversations with several commentators, I heard an oft repeated refrain about science: science is only a model, it has nothing to do with reality; our models may get closer to reality over time, but we have no way of knowing that they have gotten to reality, nor do we know that they will eventually get there. I was taken aback by this line of argument, because I thought we still had some faith in something. I personally could not imagine an existence in which faithlessness pervades our minds to an extent that we treat all possibility of knowing truth as impossible, and…
  • The Broken Watchmaker

    admin
    9 Jun 2015 | 5:29 am
    Even a broken watch tells the correct time twice in a day.  However, to know that the watch is broken, we must observe it when it tells the time incorrectly rather than when it tells it correctly. This analogy is a useful way to understand the problem in modern science, because clearly there are times in which science makes correct predictions. Those who argue that science works only look at science when it seems to work correctly. To know that they are looking at a broken watch, they would have to look at it when its predictions break down — either because the prediction…
  • Scientific Method – Does it Deliver Truth?

    admin
    4 Jun 2015 | 8:50 pm
    The below is a modified version of a response I wrote recently on Google+ in response to a question about the conflict between reason and faith. The response is also detailed in my recent book Uncommon Wisdom. This essay will argue that the manner in which science has construed the use of reason (and experience) – i.e., the path to discovery – cannot deliver truth. There is, however, another notion about reason which works in conjunction with faith to verify rather than discover the truth. Faith and reason are contradictory when reason is defined as the method of truth…
  • The Mind-Body Problem in Indian Philosophy

    admin
    17 May 2015 | 12:20 am
    The Mind-Body problem in Western philosophy concerns the difficulty in conceiving the nature of interaction between mind and body, considering that these two are supposed to be different substances—one physical and material while the other spiritual or mystical. In Indian philosophy, matter itself transforms into spirit and how this transformation occurs poses a serious problem. Two Mind-Body Problems In Western philosophy, everything that can be seen, tasted, touched, smelt or heard is material because it is extended in space and time. In Indian philosophy, many such things—such as…
  • A Solution to the Problem of Hallucination

    admin
    17 May 2015 | 12:03 am
    The problem in any kind of existence begins from a very old distinction between appearance and reality. Appearances are obviously how things seem to us in our perception although not everything that we perceive does really also exist. How things seem to us is a property of our perceptual apparatus—senses, mind, brain, etc. Reality, on the other hand, is supposed to be independent of this perceptual apparatus. Therefore, how do we know what appears to us is also real? Could it be that we are hallucinating or dreaming and what appears to us does not in fact exist? The Problem of Illusion  …
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